Archive for: Workplace violence

Missouri hospital in ‘immediate jeopardy’ fires 12 workers, installs interim leadership team

By: September 13th, 2017 Email This Post Print This Post

Corrective steps being taken to protect patients and workers alike, hospital says

A hospital in Missouri at risk of losing its Medicare funding within the month installed an interim leadership team this week as it seeks to appease federal inspectors.

Mercy Hospital Springfield was placed in “immediate jeopardy” by CMS after an inspection last month found significant violations of the regulations pertaining to nursing services and patient rights. The hospital announced last week that it had fired 12 employees whose behavior in “highly tense situations” was deemed inadequate. That news was followed Tuesday by an announcement that the interim leaders would step in to right the ship.

“They bring a fresh perspective and will help bolster local resources,” said Jon Swope, interim president of Mercy Springfield Communities, in a statement announcing six temporary leaders.

Read the rest of this entry »

California hospital where worker was murdered still an example of violence plaguing healthcare

By: August 31st, 2017 Email This Post Print This Post

Six years after a psychiatric technician at Napa State Hospital was murdered by a patient, regulators within the California Division of Occupational Safety and Health (Cal/OSHA) approved a new rule last fall to protect healthcare workers from on-the-job violence.

The rule took effect in April, and I covered the story in our May edition of Briefings on Hospital Safety, noting that federal OSHA officials were asking whether drafting a similar nationwide standard would be appropriate and worthwhile. Since then, the Trump administration has pared back OSHA’s regulatory agenda and classified the initiative to prevent workplace violence in healthcare settings as among the agency’s “long-term actions,” with no date set for the initiative’s next action item.

Meanwhile, the workers at Napa State Hospital continue to report frequent assaults against employees and patients alike. Cal/OSHA is investigating an attack on May 9, 2017, that left one worker with serious bodily injuries, the Napa Valley Register reported this month. Officials did not specify the circumstances of the attack, but a 26-year-old man arrested the following day had reportedly punched a staff member multiple times in the head and face, with a closed fist, before lifting a medical table above his head in an effort to use it as a weapon against the worker.

A judge ordered the hospital to release unredacted documents about the incident to Cal/OSHA after complaints that previously released documents “were so heavily redacted that they provided no meaningful information” to state investigators, the Register reported.

There were 886 assaults on staff reported at Napa State Hospital in 2015, according to the California Department of State Hospitals violence report for 2016. That figure was about the same in 2014 and 2013, but it was higher in 2012, when 1,048 assaults on staff were reported.

The 886 assaults on staff in 2015 are in addition to the 1,053 reported assaults on patients.

“That’s 1,939 reported assaults and who knows what wasn’t reported,” Michael Bartos, MD, former medical chief of staff for Napa State Hospital, wrote in a letter to the Register editor last week.

“A facility with 1,200 patients that reports over 1,000 patient assaults in a single year could be considered somewhat less than a healing environment and with almost 900 staff assaults might not be the best place to work, even with generous state benefits,” Bartos added. “Despite the problems, the majority of front line staff including nurses, psychiatry technicians, social workers, rehabilitation therapists, psychologists and psychiatrists, are dedicated professionals doing their best under difficult circumstances.”

Potential security breach prompts suspension of OSHA’s new injury-tracking portal [UPDATED]

By: August 17th, 2017 Email This Post Print This Post

[Editor’s note: Access to OSHA’s data portal has been restored. See updates below.]

Just two weeks after its already-delayed launch, an online portal designed to collect data on worksite injuries has been suspended amid information security concerns.

Use of the portal, OSHA’s Injury Tracking Application (ITA), was supposed to become mandatory for certain employers on July 1, 2017, pursuant to the controversial electronic recordkeeping rule. But officials signaled back in May that they would be postponing the deadline, and they formally did so in June—giving the approximately 466,000 affected employers five additional months, until December, to begin using the application.

The ITA finally went live August 1, a full month after its original implementation date, as labor attorney Tressi L. Cordaro with Jackson Lewis P.C. noted Monday in a blog post. The ITA was suspended, however, on Tuesday after the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) notified the Department of Labor (DOL) that user information might have been compromised, Cordaro added Wednesday.

Those who tried accessing the portal Thursday morning were greeted with a message in red lettering: “Alert: Due to technical difficulties with the website, some pages are temporarily unavailable. To file a complaint with OSHA or to ask a safety and health question, call 1-800-321-6742 (OSHA).”

Bloomberg BNA’s Ben Penn reported Wednesday that a DOL official didn’t identify the one company involved in the potential breach. While the portal will eventually be used to collect detailed employee records, experts told Penn that the information currently being collected isn’t sensitive. That being said, the snafu could betray a level of unpreparedness in the ITA rollout.

“This agency has a lot of experience with doing this—and doing it right,” said Deborah Berkowitz, a senior fellow with the National Employment Law Project who served as OSHA chief of staff under former President Barack Obama, according to Penn’s report. “This is a brand new application, and because of the new administration, it was never tested.”

Berkowitz added that OSHA should take the time offered by this suspension to “get it right” and protect the database.

Representatives with DOL and OSHA contacted via email and telephone were not immediately available Thursday to answer questions about the suspension and possible breach.

Update (8/25/17): The application was back online as of Friday, August 25, 2017. I have requested additional details on what led to the outage and will publish what I find.

Update (8/28/17): An OSHA spokesperson said in an email that the National Information Technology Center conducted a scan and confirmed that none of the ITA data had been compromised. “As part of this review, the entire OSHA website was scanned and improvements implemented,” the spokesperson said. Public access to the portal was restored Friday, as OSHA continues its regular security monitoring processes.

‘Don’t Hold The Door’: Boston hospital uses multimedia approach to reinforce safety training

By: June 23rd, 2017 Email This Post Print This Post

Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) in Boston is well-acquainted with the dangers an unauthorized person can pose when granted access to restricted areas. The facility suffered unflattering headlines earlier this year when the public learned that 42-year-old Cheryl Wang had bluffed her way into five ORs and other patient care areas late last year by posing as a doctor-in-training, despite having been dismissed from her surgical residency program.

Wang’s case—which brought an unsettling reminder of the 2015 security lapse that enabled a disgruntled man to corner and kill a BWH doctor in an exam room—drew attention to an extremely common security vulnerability known as “tailgating” or “piggybacking.” When walking through a doorway, it’s common courtesy to hold the door for whoever is behind you. That’s a problem, however, if the person behind you doesn’t have permission to go where you’re going.

To reinforce the lesson that every hospital employee has a responsibility to help keep unauthorized people out of restricted areas, BWH produced instructional videos that depict disturbingly mundane security lapses. The two dramatizations, titled “Be Aware” and “Don’t Hold The Door,” will be shown to all 18,000 of BWH’s employees.

“We intended for the videos to be provocative, to invoke a strong reaction, so that they would be memorable,” said Erin McDonough, BWH’s chief communication officer, in a statement.

One video depicts two workers chatting as they return to their stations from a coffee break, unaware that an unknown woman has followed them onto a restricted elevator. From there, the woman gains access to a maternity ward to abduct a newborn. The other shows a worker in scrubs politely holding the door for an unknown man.

Be Aware from BWH Public Affairs on Vimeo.

“Closing a door to someone feels uncomfortable and impolite, and it contradicts what many of us have been taught from a young age,” McDonough said. “We need our staff to know the potentially dangerous consequences of enabling people who do not have permission to access restricted areas—whether consciously or unconsciously—and give them tools that empower them to take action.”

The two videos are the centerpiece of BWH’s safety campaign, but they are buttressed by a multi-pronged approach that includes the following:

  • Signage. The points where unauthorized access is most likely to occur, including some 1,200 card scanners throughout BWH’s facilities, will be labeled with signs to remind workers to be aware of who’s coming with them.
  • Reminder cards. Workers will be issued additional cards that bear the slogan “Stop, Challenge, Assist,” with a phone number for hospital security, as a reminder to use their privileged access with caution and care.
  • Policies. Employees who are followed by an unauthorized person are now required to abide by two updated policies: Either question the person directly, or contact security to do so. There’s no option to merely dismiss the unauthorized access as nonthreatening.
  • Training. After hospital employees screen the two videos, they will role-play related scenarios with a security team, then follow-up to session with a Q-and-A to discuss what they learned.

In addition to training its own staff, BWH has opted to share the components of this campaign far and wide—a helpful gesture, considering that tailgating and piggybacking are a safety consideration in every healthcare facility.

“People who work in the healthcare setting have a natural inclination to help others,” said Dave Corbin, BWH’s director of security and parking, in the statement. “Our campaign emphasizes that being aware is one of the best ways for them to ensure the wellbeing of patients, their families and each other.”

Don't Hold the Door from BWH Public Affairs on Vimeo.

Hospital calls criticism from former OSHA official ‘ill-informed commentary’

By: June 14th, 2017 Email This Post Print This Post

I came across an interesting (and lengthy) post last week on Jordan Barab’s “Confined Space” blog about a hospital that successfully defended itself against an OSHA citation. Barab, a former OSHA official himself, had some harsh words for Bergen Regional Medical Center (BRMC) in Paramus, N.J., going so far as to accuse BRMC of trying to revise history.

“[T]he hospital’s contention that its workplace violence prevention program ‘has once again been found to be compliant’ is false,” Barab wrote. He pointed to a written warning OSHA sent BRMC in 2014, followed by a citation in 2015, as evidence that the hospital’s program had been deemed inadequate under the OSH Act’s General Duty Clause.

Since the blog post accused BRMC of misrepresenting the facts, I reached out to hospital spokeswoman Donnalee Corrieri for her response. She noted that Barab had left OSHA before a key stage in the discovery process, so his opinions appear to be based on information as alleged in 2015, rather than the full picture as uncovered throughout months of litigation.

“After considering all of the evidence, which OSHA did not have the benefit of when it [made] its initial allegation, OSHA obviously concluded that the initial citation was misplaced, and agreed to withdraw the citation related to workplace violence in its entirety,” Corrieri told me in an email.

“Mr. Barab’s ill-informed commentary seems to stem from his view that even a single instance of workplace violence means an employer’s [workplace violence prevention program] is somehow insufficient,” Corrieri added. “However, OSHA’s [workplace violence] Guidelines for healthcare acknowledge that ‘not every incident can be prevented.’ The reality is, the Medical Center consistently experiences fewer incidents of violence than its peer medical systems in New Jersey and nationally.”

For more on this, read my article in this week’s free weekly Hospital Safety Insider e-newsletter.

Nurses held hostage at Ill. hospital accuse deputy of fleeing scene

By: May 26th, 2017 Email This Post Print This Post

Two nurses who were held hostage earlier this month by an inmate receiving medical care at an Illinois hospital, filed a federal lawsuit Thursday accusing a security guard of putting them in danger then running away.

Instead of protecting medical staff from 21-year-old Tywon Salters, who was being cared for at Delnor Community Hospital in Geneva after swallowing liquid cleaner and a sandal at the jail, security guard Shawn Loomis left the inmate “totally unrestrained in the hospital room” for at least 30 minutes, the suit alleges.

Salters then grabbed a handgun from Loomis about 12:30 p.m. May 13, before finding the nurses and holding them at gunpoint. Salters forced one of the nurses into a first-floor “decontamination room,” where he sexually assaulted her for the next three hours, until a SWAT team broke in and killed him, according to the lawsuit.

Loomis, a corrections officer employed by the Kane County Sheriff’s Office and the private firm APEX3 Security LLC, allegedly fled the room when Salters took his weapon. Loomis shut himself in another room and “took no action whatsoever to protect hospital staff and nurses after he lost control” of Salters, the suit states. He and both of his employers were named as defendants.

The nurses accuse Kane County, APEX3, and Loomis of failing to protect them from a known danger. Their husbands, who are also plaintiffs in the suit, raise “loss of consortium” claims against the three defendants.

Sean Murray, the attorney representing all four anonymous plaintiffs, said in a news conference Thursday that his clients have suffered significantly.

“I represent employees who just came to work that day to do their job, and they left traumatized for life,” Murray said, according to The Beacon-News. The hospital and its system, Northwestern Medicine, were not named as defendants.

The suit seeks unspecified compensatory damages and other relief. Officials with the Kane County Sheriff’s Office declined to comment on the specific allegations raised, Chicago Sun-Times reported.

Healthcare needs to get real about active shooters

By: October 27th, 2015 Email This Post Print This Post

I had the pleasure yesterday of spending a day at the 2015 annual conference of the American College of Emergency Physicians (ACEP), which is being held here in my beautiful hometown of Boston.

Being in the safety business, I sat in on a session about active shooter response preparation in healthcare facilities, led by an emergency physician and security director with Carolinas Medical Center in Charlotte. I didn’t leave with that feeling like we have our collective act together.

Are we really ready for someone to come into our hospitals with a gun, bent on causing mass carnage?

First, let’s start with the numbers. From 2000-2007, there were “only” about 6 shootings a year. From 2007 to today, the numbers jumped to 17 per year.

Many facilities are following the government’s recommendations to “run, hide, and fight” when confronted with a gunman. That’s fine training, if you’re in an office building. Run first, hide when you can, and fight back as a last resort.

But that won’t fly in hospitals and clinics where people are counting on you to help them survive. Poll numbers I heard quoted estimate that at least 40% of healthcare staff wouldn’t leave their patients’ sides, even when confronted with a shooter.

Hospitals need to train their staff to stay alive. Most active shooter incidents end within 7 minutes, and doctors and nurses are then required to turn around and treat the wounded and prevent as much death as possible.

So my question is this: What are you doing to prepare for an active shooter in your facility? Do you have specific plans? Are you training your staff, and what resources are you using?

Please drop me a line at jpalmer@hcpro.com and share your thoughts on this very real threat.

Thanks!

John Palmer

 

Upcoming Webinar: Active Shooters in Healthcare Facilities

By: September 11th, 2015 Email This Post Print This Post

Active shooters and armed violence represent a rapidly growing issue in America’s hospitals and healthcare facilities. These incidents occur on a near-weekly basis, which means it is time to face the fact that they can also happen in your facility.

Don’t wait until it’s too late to develop an emergency response plan. Join HCPro for a live webcast on Tuesday, September 23 from 1:00-2:30 p.m.

The program will be presented by healthcare safety experts Lisa Pryse Terry, CHPA, CPP, and Christian M. Lanphere, PhD, FP-C, NRP, CEM. They will teach participants how to lessen the risk of a violent confrontation and how to prepare facility staff in the event an armed intruder comes through their doors, and then will take your questions live.

For more information and to register for the webcast, call HCPro customer service at 800-650-6787 or visit http://hcmarketplace.com.\

Try our workplace violence prevention tools!

By: May 28th, 2015 Email This Post Print This Post

We’ve been telling you for some time now that you need to get a workplace violence prevention plan in place in your facility, and now it’s time for us to help you get started.

If you’re looking for a place to start, we have lots of downloadable tools and resources for you to use in your own facility. For instance, try the workplace violence assessment checklist as a place to start to determine the weak spots in your facility’s security. Next, give our safety tips poster to your employees during your next in-service training meeting.

According to Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2013 more than 23,000 significant injuries were caused due to assaults at work. More than 70 percent of these assaults were in healthcare and social service settings. Health care and social service workers are almost four times more likely to be injured as a result of violence than the average private sector worker, OSHA says.

Further statistics show that about 27 out of the 100, or about 30% of the fatalities in healthcare and social service settings that occurred in 2013 were due to assaults and violent acts.

As a result, OSHA issued the update to OSHA 3148 in April, encouraging healthcare workplaces to develop a workplace violence prevention plan. It’s not so much an “encouragement” as it is a warning that inspectors will be checking to make sure you have a plan in place.

We’re here to help you do your job better and safer. Look to HCPro for all of your healthcare safety and security resources!

Subscribe - Get blog updates via e-mail

  • test
  • HCPro Broadcast Events Calendar

hcpro.com