Archive for: Workplace violence prevention

Bomb Threat Training

By: December 31st, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Question: Another practice in our medical complex had a bomb threat called in. What do I need to train our staff to do if it happens here?

Answer: The exact course of action will depend on whether the threat is received by phone, letter, handwritten note, email, or in the form of a suspicious package. Although what to do varies by situation, in all situations, do not:

  • Use two-way radios or cellular phones, because radio signals have the potential to detonate a bomb
  • Evacuate the building until after police arrive and evaluate the threat
  • Activate the fire alarm
  • Touch or move a suspicious package

The Department of Homeland Security has a good one-page document you can print out and put by each phone that receives outside calls to help staff members know what actions to take if they receive a suspicious call. It is available at http://emilms.fema.gov/is906/assets/ocso-bomb_threat_samepage-brochure.pdf

*This is an excerpt from The OSHA Training Handbook for Healthcare Facilities by Sarah E. Alholm, MAS.

Domestic violence at root of hospital fatality

By: June 18th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

The shooting at the Erie County (NY) Medical Center shows that violence in healthcare is not only limited to attacks on workers by patients and guests. Worker-on-worker and domestic disputes also are part of healthcare workplace violence concerns.

On June 13, Jacqueline Wisniewski, 33, was found shot to death in a stairwell in an Erie County Medical Center building, according to CNN, June 15. Police suspected Dr. Timothy V. Jorden, 49, a trauma center surgeon at the medical center and also believed to be in a relationship with Wisniewski.

Investigators found Jorden dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head on June 15, CNN reports.

Click here for an OSHA Healthcare Advisor post on efforts to protect federal workers from domestic violence.

Weekly poll: Checking for slip, trip, fall hazards

By: June 18th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Week #3 of National Safety Council (NSC) Safety Month is Preventing Slips, Trips and Falls week. According to the NIOSH workbook, Slip, Trip, and Fall Prevention for Healthcare Workers, the incidence rate of lost-workday injuries from slips, trips, and falls (STFs) in hospitals was 90% greater than the average rate for all other private industries combined.

NIOSH recommends conducting regular walk throughs using an STF check list to identify hazards, keeping a file of hazard photographs or descriptions, identifying staff members responsible for fixing the hazard and a targeted completion date. Compared to NIOSH recommendations, how thorough are you or staff members with regular STF walk-through inspection.

Take the OSHA Healthcare Advisor Weekly Poll and let us know.

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Most common type of emergency room workplace violence

By: May 21st, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Healthcare workplace violence can be of the physical or verbal type.

Here are the top three most common physical and verbal forms of workplace violence that emergency department RNs were exposed to in a seven day period, according to a 2010 survey by Emergency Nurses Association.

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Healthcare workplace violence compared to other occupations

By: May 21st, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Healthcare workers were victims of workplace violence  at more than twice the rate of the general workforce but less often than people in other dangerous jobs.

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Weekly poll: Domestic violence in the workplace

By: May 14th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Federal employers will be required to create policies to prevent domestic violence in the workplace. Does your workplace violence prevention program specifically address the threats and effects of domestic violence in the workplace? Take the OSHA Healthcare Advisor Weekly Poll and let us know.

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President requires policies for preventing domestic violence in federal workplaces

By: May 11th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Hoping that all other employers will follow the example, President Obama issued a memorandum specifically requiring federal workplaces to protect workers from domestic violence related situations.

“The memorandum directs the Director of Office of Personnel Management, in consultation with the Attorney General, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, the Secretary of Labor, the Secretary of Homeland Security, and other interested heads of agencies, to issue guidance to agencies addressing the effects of domestic violence on the federal workforce, according to a White House news release.

According the White House announcement, the memo calls for:

  • Guidelines for assisting employee victims
  • Leave policies relating to domestic violence situations
  • General guidelines on when it may be appropriate to take disciplinary action against employees who commit or threaten acts of domestic violence
  • Steps agencies can take to improve workplace safety related to domestic violence
  • Resources for identifying relevant best practices related to domestic violence

A recent study by study by NIOSH and the Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University found that intimate partner violence resulted in nearly a quarter of the homicides among women at work in the U.S, and that healthcare is one of the more common settings where domestic violence occurs in the workplace.

Don’t be part of the headlines. Prevent violence in your healthcare facility.
Two of today’s leading security experts will offer strategies to prevent workplace violence in healthcare during the 90-minute webcast Violence in Healthcare: Proven Strategies to Keep Your Facility Safe. They will discuss how you can stay compliant with government regulations, what you can do now to assess high-risk patients, and how to establish a violence prevention plan.For more information or to order, call 800/650-6787 and mention Source Code EOSHAB or visit The HCPro Healthcare Marketplace.

Don’t be part of the headlines: Prevent violence in your healthcare facility

By: May 10th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Bit of a plug, but visitors to OSHA Healthcare Advisor will find HCPro’s webinar on preventing violence in healthcare extremely relevant.

Despite Joint Commission Sentinel Event Alerts and OSHA guidance, violence in healthcare is on the rise and in the news.

Your workplace violence program will be ineffective unless you asses and act on the unique challenges presented by your patient profile, especially at-risk patients, facility setting, staff education, and available resource allocation.

So join Tony York and Alan Butler, two  leading healthcare security experts, for Violence in Healthcare: Proven Strategies to Keep Your Facility Safe,  a 90-minute webcast on May 23.

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Intimate partner violence in workplace homicides touches healthcare

By: May 9th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Intimate partner violence resulted in nearly a quarter of the homicides among women at work in the U.S, and healthcare is one of the more common settings, according to a study by NIOSH and Injury Control Research Center at West Virginia University.

The study, which appears in April 2012 issue of Annals of Epidemiology, found that the leading cause of homicides among women was criminal intent, such as those resulting from robberies of retail stores (39 percent), followed closely by homicides carried out by personal relations (33 percent). Nearly 80 percent of these personal relations were intimate partners.

Women in protective-service occupations had the highest overall homicide rate; however, women in healthcare, production and office/administration had the highest proportion of homicides related to intimate partner violence. Over half of the homicides committed by intimate partners occurred in parking lots and public buildings.

 

Don’t be part of the headlines. Prevent violence in your healthcare facility.
Two of today’s leading security experts will offer strategies to prevent workplace violence in healthcare during the 90-minute webcast Violence in Healthcare: Proven Strategies to Keep Your Facility Safe. They will discuss how you can stay compliant with government regulations, what you can do now to assess high-risk patients, and how to establish a violence prevention plan.For more information or to order, call 800/650-6787 and mention Source Code EOSHAB or visit The HCPro Healthcare Marketplace.

Assaults at hospital draw OSHA workplace violence fine

By: May 3rd, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Lakeview Specialty Hospital, Waterford, WI, made the headlines when it received an OSHA fine for not protecting workers from workplace violence hazards.

According to OSHA, the agency initiated an investigation after receiving a complaint that a staff member had been severely beaten and threatened by a patient at the facility on Sept. 28, 2011. A police report was also filed the Racine County Sheriff’s Department.

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Calif. psych hospitals fined for not protecting workers

By: March 15th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Two California state psychiatric hospitals were fined by Cal-OSHA for failing to protect workers from assaults.

The agency fined Patton State Hospital $57,400 and Atascadero State Hospital $38,555, according to California Healthline, March 9.

“The agency alleged that Patton’s inadequate injury and illness prevention plans contributed to about 20 patient-caused staff injuries each month between January 2006 and September 2011…that Atascadero had an average of eight patient-caused staff injuries each month between January 2007 and October 2011,” according to the report.

 

Nurses bear the brunt of abuse in emergency departments

By: November 23rd, 2011 Email This Post Print This Post

The latest results from a survey by the Emergency Nurses Association Institute for Emergency Nursing Research shows that over any seven-day period in 2010, 53% of nurses reported experiencing verbal abuse and 13% reported experiencing physical violence, according to HealthLeaders Media, November 14. Furthermore, these results are not much improved compared to a similar survey done in 2009.

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