Archive for: Infection Control

Guest Column: Be Personally Protected

By: July 8th, 2014 Email This Post Print This Post

The following is an occasional series of guest blogs by experts in the medical clinic safety field. If you would like to be featured in this blog as a guest columnist, please email Managing Editor of Safety John Palmer at jpalmer@hcpro.com.

In some laboratories, the use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) may be confusing to staff. However, a look at OSHA’s Bloodborne Pathogens and Chemical Hygiene Standards should make clear the requirements for proper PPE selection and use.

Both standards speak clearly to the necessity of PPE when working in the laboratory. Different PPE is needed for different tasks. Lab coats are always necessary in the lab for protection against blood and body fluid splashes or chemical splashes. Plastic aprons may also be used as extra protection in areas where gross tissue work is performed. Lab coats should be buttoned, the sleeves should not be rolled up, and they should be knee-length.

Gloves are needed when handling blood, body fluids, or chemicals, but different gloves may be used for different tasks. Many labs are turning away from using latex gloves because of allergic reactions by staff. Nitrile gloves have become the norm in recent years. However, make sure you have the correct gloves for the duties being performed. Some manufacturers make nitrile gloves that act as a barrier against blood and body fluids, but they do not provide protection against chemicals.  While these will be fine while running a CBC in hematology, they won’t provide enough protection when changing the stainer. Be sure to use chemical-resistant gloves for this and other tasks (gram stains, handling chemistry reagents, pouring acids, etc.). Check the package if you are not sure about the proper use of gloves.

Goggles or face protection is important PPE that is widely under-utilized. Do you carry open specimens in the lab? What about carrying a rack of specimen tubes to or from an analyzer? That is a task that creates a risk for exposure, and face protection should be used. Are you pouring a chemical? Protection is necessary. Help your staff avoid all exposures to the eyes or mucous membranes.

The OSHA standards mentioned above also require that PPE is removed before leaving the laboratory. Do not wear lab coats or gloves to another location outside the laboratory. Does a procedure need to be performed in another area that requires PPE? If so, bring fresh PPE with you for use in the treatment area and dispose of it before returning to the lab.

In a laboratory, all areas should be considered hazardous, bio-hazardous, or contaminated. Do you have a desk area in the lab where only paperwork is done? I have always said that if there is an area in the lab where there are no patient specimens or chemicals, then one could consider the area “clean.” However, that does not mean that food or drink can be consumed there or that no PPE is needed. Remember, you are still in the walls of a laboratory, and accidents may occur. It is acceptable to label the area as “clean” so that gloves are not needed for the computer or phone, but a lab coat would still be required.

Remember, if an OSHA inspector arrives, he will be looking to see that all aspects of safety regulations are being followed. Keep your employees safe and keep your facility from unnecessary fines by using PPE where and whenever needed.

Dan Scungio, MT (ASCP), SLS, also known as “Dan the Lab Safety Man,” is a Laboratory Safety Officer for Sentara Healthcare, a multi-hospital system in the Tidewater region of Virginia.

Robot disinfects hospital rooms with a touch of a button

By: March 4th, 2013 Email This Post Print This Post

Imagine if you could hit a button and have a patient room disinfected within 10 minutes? Thanks to Mark Stibich, a Texas-based epidemiologist, that concept has become a reality. Stibich co-founded Xenex Healthcare Services and developed a germ-fighting robot that uses UV light to kill viruses, bacteria, and spores.

More than 100 hospitals have purchased or rented the robots, and for good reason. Studies have found that the robot cuts bacterial contamination by a factor of 20 and kills more than 75% of the pathogen C. difficile. Stibich told BusinessWeek that he got the idea to sanitize hospital rooms with UV light several years ago while working in Russia, where he learned that a UV lamp was being used to kill airborne tuberculosis germs.

To use the robot, hospital housekeepers simply wheel it into the room, close the door, and use a remote to operate it. Each robot costs $125,000 or a monthly fee of $3,700. While it seems pricey, the average cost of a hospital-acquired infection can be close to $30,000, making the robot a worthwhile investment. Stibich notes that the robots can be used in staff areas as well as patient rooms, adding to their value in creating a safe hospital environment.

Certification of infection preventionists could yield better practices

By: February 20th, 2013 Email This Post Print This Post

Hospital infection preventionists (IP) are generally in agreement as to which practices have strong or weak evidence to support their use, with those IPs certified in infection prevention and control perceiving evidence as strong more often than non-certified IPs, according to a study published recently in the American Journal of Infection Control. Researchers of the VA Ann Arbor & University of Michigan Medical School conducted the study as a means of understanding how those who lead infections prevention activities perceive the strength of evidence supporting practices designed to prevent device- and procedure-associated infections. IPs lead programs to protect patients and healthcare workers alike.

Of the 28 practices included in the study, alcohol-based hand rub, aseptic urinary catheter insertion, and semi-recumbent positioning of patients on ventilators were among those practices perceived to have strong evidence to support their use, according to 90% of respondents. Practices identified as having weak evidence included central catheter changes, the use of silver-coated endotracheal tubes for ventilator-associated pneumonia, and the use of antimicrobials in the urinary catheter drainage bag.

According to researchers, the study’s results suggest that certified IPs may lead to greater evidence-based practice, which would in turn lead to a reduction of healthcare-associated infections and hospital costs.

Does your organization encourage certification for infection preventionists? Do you feel that certification is a necessary step for IPs? Share in the comments sections below.

Poll: Hand washing in healthcare settings

By: January 23rd, 2013 Email This Post Print This Post

Create your free online surveys with SurveyMonkey, the world’s leading questionnaire tool.

State advises 8,000 dental patients to be tested for hepatitis, HIV

By: July 24th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

An investigation by the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment indicates that as many as 8,000 dental patients may have been exposed to bloodborne pathogens from unsafe injection practices.

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Should Fed funding for patient safety go bye-bye?

By: July 23rd, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

A House subcommittee, on July 18, voted to eliminate all funding for the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ).

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Oregon’s hospitals report HAI prevention success

By: July 17th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

The fight against healthcare-associated infections (HAIs) by Oregon hospitals has yielded impressive results in decreased infection rates and potential cost savings, according to a July 17 announcement from the CDC.

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Mercy! Time to consider risk of MRSA from unsafe injections

By: July 17th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Move over hepatitis B, C, and HIV, and make room for MRSA infections as a consequence of unsafe injection practices.

A July 16 post on the CDC Safe Healthcare blog by Dr. Michael Bell, associate director for infection control at the Division of Healthcare Quality Promotion, discusses two recent outbreaks in Arizona and Delaware where the use of medication from single-dose/single-use vials for multiple patients resulted in “staph/MRSA infections in at least 10 patients receiving injections for pain relief.”

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Ask the expert: Healthcare worker TB exposure

By: July 16th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Q: A patient seen by our practice has recently tested positive for tuberculosis and is undergoing treatment.  From an OSHA perspective, what follow-up treatment do we need to do for employees who were exposed to him?

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Alta Bates Summit ordered to pay $84,450

By: July 12th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Cal/OSHA has imposed an $84,450 fine on Alta Bates Summit Medical Center for failure to warn and protect a hospital worker and an Oakland police officer exposed to an emergency room patient with meningitis, according to the San Jose Mercury News, July 2.

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Working while sick. Is it really worth it?

By: July 12th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

It happens to everyone at some point: you wake up with a cough, a headache, or a stuffy nose, and all you want to do is go right back to sleep. But more often than not, something pulls you out of bed and you force yourself through the daily grind. After all, you can’t afford to miss that meeting or leave your colleagues in the lurch, right?

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Voluntary recall by Advanced Sterilization Products

By: July 10th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Advanced Sterilization Products (ASP) issued a voluntary recall of certain lots of its STERRAD® CYCLESURE® 24 Biological Indicator product.

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