Archive for: Hazardous Waste

Joint Commission shares 2017 standards compliance data for healthcare facilities

By: March 27th, 2018 Email This Post Print This Post

The Joint Commission (TJC) has released its lists, each based on the type of facility surveyed, of the requirements most frequently scored as “not compliant” during accreditation surveys and certification reviews during the 2017 calendar year.

The list of requirements scored as “not compliant” during 1,443 hospital surveys:

  1. LS.02.01.35: Systems for extinguishing fires are provided and its systems/devices are appropriately installed and maintained. (86%)
  2. EC.02.05.01: Utility systems are well designed, inventoried, monitored, and managed according to written procedures when disruptions in the utility system occur. (73%)
  3. LS.02.01.30: Building features are maintained which prevent the spread and fueling of fire and smoke. (72%)
  4. IC.02.02.01: Infection prevention and control activities are performed relative to the cleaning, storing, and disposing of medical equipment/devices. (72%)
  5. EC.02.06.01: Physical environment (e.g., lighting, temperature, ventilation, equipment, furnishings, space, etc.) is safe and functional. (70%)
  6. LS.02.01.10: Effects of fire, smoke, and heat are mitigated through the design and maintenance of building and fire protection features. (66%)
  7. EC.02.02.01: Risks related to hazardous materials and hazardous waste are managed as described in written policy. (63%)
  8. LS.02.01.20: Means of egress are maintained. (62%)
  9. EC.02.05.05: Testing and regular inspections of utilities are done. (62%)
  10. EC.02.05.09: Medical gas and vacuum systems are labeled, tested, inspected, and maintained. (59%)

The list of requirements scored as “not compliant” during 104 surveys of office-based surgery practices:

  1. IC.02.02.01: Infection prevention and control activities are performed relative to the cleaning, storing, and disposing of medical equipment/devices. (63%)
  2. HR.02.01.03: Individuals permitted by law and the organization to practice independently are granted by the practice initial, renewed, or updated clinical privileges. (61%)
  3. EC.02.04.03: Testing and regular inspections of medical equipment are done. (37%)
  4. MM.03.01.01: The hospital’s medications are stored in a manner which maintains their integrity, minimizes their diversion, reduces dispensing error, and promotes availability while following manufacturer guidelines, laws, and regulations. (34%)
  5. IC.02.01.01: Implementation of the written infection surveillance, prevention, and control plan is implemented by the hospital. (27%)
  6. NPSG.03.04.01: Medications, medication containers, and other solutions removed from their original container and placed into a container, both on and off the sterile field, are labeled as consistent with safe medication practices. (24%)
  7. HR.01.06.01: The organization has a competency assessment process in place. (23%)
  8. EC.02.05.07: Emergency power systems are tested, inspected, and maintained as required by the Life Safety Code®. (22%)
  9. WT.04.01.01: Quality control checks are performed as defined in the quality control plan for waived testing. (20%)
  10. MM.01.01.03: High-alert and hazardous medications defined by the hospital are safely managed. (18%)

Our expert answers a couple of reader questions related to waste disposal

By: February 19th, 2018 Email This Post Print This Post

When you’ve got healthcare safety or standards questions, we’ve got answers. More specifically, we’ve got a stable of industry experts who are only an email away and are willing and able to give you the guidance you are seeking.

This time, we turned to Dan Scungio, MT(ASCP), SLS, the laboratory safety officer for Sentara Healthcare in Virginia, to answer a pair of waste disposal questions recently posed by our readers. Scungio, aka “Dan, the Lab Safety Man,” writes a monthly column for our monthly Medical Environment Update newsletter.

Question No. 1, from a blog commenter named Sarah Winters: “I am the nursing supervisor for a school district. At the end of every year, the nurses at the schools close and seal their full sharps boxes and transport them in their vehicles to [our] central office, where I then take them to EMS for disposal. A safety/health inspector has told us this is unsafe and violates the OSHA standard. I cannot find how that violates any OSHA regulation. Suggestions? Resources? Thanks.”

Answer from Dan, the Lab Safety Man: “OSHA does not directly regulate the transport of hazardous waste, but the U.S. Department of Transportation does. The DOT states that if you are not in the business of transporting hazardous materials, the process of sharps transport for the schools falls under the DOT’s Materials of Trade exemption. That means it is acceptable to transport used sharps in your private vehicle provided they are packaged in containers constructed of a rigid material that is resistant to punctures and securely closed to prevent leaks. That said, individual state regulations may supersede federal DOT rules, so it is important to know what the transport laws are in your specific state.”

Question No. 2, submitted anonymously via email: “Can we dispose of irrigation fluid from the anterior chamber of the eye in the regular garbage if not visibly contaminated with blood and is self-contained in a sealed bag?”

Answer from Dan, the Lab Safety Man: “Eye irrigation fluid may not be considered an infectious waste if it does not contain blood, but it is probably not a good idea to place it into the regular (non-hazardous) waste stream. It is important to consider those who handle the trash after it leaves your site. If there is breakage of a sealed container or bag that creates an exposure, that would create a scenario that will raise questions for the person exposed and a situation that should be avoided.”

Got a question you’d like answered? Shoot us a note at mvensel@hcpro.com.

High-reliability healthcare, ‘preoccupation with failure’ and a valuable workshop

By: February 1st, 2018 Email This Post Print This Post

Gary L. Sculli, MSN, ATP, brings a unique perspective to safety in healthcare. In addition to being a registered nurse for more than three decades, he has served as an officer in the United States Air Force Nurse Corps and for many years worked as a pilot for a major U.S. airline.

Three years ago, Sculli shared some of his experiences and many of the insights gained during a diverse career in an HCPro book, “Building a High-Reliability Organization: A Toolkit for Success,” which was coauthored by Douglas E. Paull, MD, MS, FACS, FCCP, CHSE. Below is a book excerpt from a chapter on failure, in which the authors urged healthcare leaders, in the pursuit of high reliability, to embrace the concept of “preoccupation with failure.”

At the core, much of patient safety is dealing with uncertainties and unexpected events, the cardiac arrest being a prime example. In moments like these, not only do organizations rely on the technical expertise of staff and best practice guidelines, but also benefit from teams that are flexible, can adapt, and in essence, are resilient. Organizations themselves must be resilient to deal effectively with the changing face of healthcare.

Let’s examine a disaster from forest firefighting history—the Mann Gulch Fire in 1949. Young firefighters parachuted into Mann Gulch, near Helena, Montana, to combat what they believed was a rather routine forest fire. They were led by foreman Wag Dodge. But when the fire jumped from the south to the north side of the gulch, the firefighters were trapped and isolated from their escape route to the Missouri River. There were two possible routes for survival; either join Wag Dodge in his newly devised “circle of fire” or run to the top of the north ridge. This was the first time the circle of fire had been utilized during forest firefighting. Essentially, Dodge lit the grasslands on fire depriving the oncoming fire of any fuel to spread, thus protecting anyone within the circle. Whether due to a lack of trust, leadership, or communication, none of the other firefighters joined Dodge within the circle, despite his efforts to encourage them to do so. In addition, the young firefighters would not drop their heavy backpacks, slowing their ascent to the top of the north ridge. Thirteen firefighters died with their backpacks on and within sight of safety in the circle of fire or beyond the ridge. Dodge survived because he was able to pivot and adjust to rapidly changing and unexpected conditions.   

Several authors have discussed resilience, flexibility, innovation, and adaptability as attributes of successful organizations, including those in healthcare. Healthcare organizations must be able to learn from their mistakes. They must be able to face reality, “drop their old tools,” and accept the fact that the landscape can and will change suddenly and that unexpected events will occur. They must also accept that the best solutions to navigate the unexpected may be found in high-reliability industries. When viewed in this manner, leaders are not afraid to actively demand, even when faced with obstacles, such things as perpetual team training, mass standardization, briefings and handoffs, situational awareness support, just culture, staffing increases, and other patient safety initiatives. Leaders model open-mindedness and embrace innovation when unforeseen or novel situations arise. They talk with and listen to staff at the frontline when it comes to identifying and solving systemic challenges and failures. In many ways, current healthcare leaders are in a position similar to Wag Dodge. They must be resilient, prepared to build a circle of fire, and change course in order to solve unexpected and complex problems.

This spring, Sculli is again partnering with HCPro to give healthcare leaders the needed tools and guidance to create a culture of high reliability and safety within their organizations.

On April 16, Sculli will lead an intensive one-day workshop at Renaissance Orlando at SeaWorld® in Orlando, Florida. For more information on this upcoming HCPro workshop — which targets healthcare safety professionals, CEOs, COOs, VPMAs, risk managers, and quality/performance improvement professionals — please check out the event page at hcmarketplace.com.

LA dumps medical waste fine on hospital

By: July 19th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Kaiser’s South Bay Medical Center will pay $73,615.40 in fines for unlawful disposal of medical waste.

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Hospital dinged for waste disposal practices

By: May 31st, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

A New Hampshire hospital was fined for improper disposal of pharmaceutical waste.

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Vital stats: Training time for HazCom changes

By: May 17th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Changes to the Hazard Communication Standard, which incorporate the Globally Harmonized System of Classification and Labeling of Chemicals, require employers to train workers by December 1, 2013. OSHA Healthcare Advisor asked its readers whether they think this is enough time to train workers on the changes in the standard. Here are the results:

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Household prescription take back day, April 28

By: April 27th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

The Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) is sponsoring National Prescription Drug Take-Back Day which will occur in various locations nationwide Saturday, April 28, 2012, from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

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Doctor, don’t dump thyself!

By: February 22nd, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

A doctor in Bonita Springs, FL, disposed of medical waste … the problem is it wasn’t at his practice.

Stephen J Kaskie was arrested and charged with disposing of hazardous waste without a permit for allegedly dropping off five red bags of regulated medical waste at the door of Bonita Community Health Center, where he once, but no longer, rents space, according to WBBH-TV, February 10.

In addition to general medical waste, the red bags also contained contaminated needles, according to the report.

“I think it’s absolutely disgusting that a doctor would do something like that – a doctor of all people!” patient Ellen Stewart told WBBH-TV. “There’s no telling what kind of diseases, what kind of infections might have been present in those materials.”

To assess you regulated medical waste policy, download the Regulated Medical Waste Checklist from the Tool page.

San Diego hospitals pay for unlawful medical waste disposal

By: December 15th, 2011 Email This Post Print This Post

Civil lawsuits against two San Diego hospitals for medical waste disposal violations have been settled, reports Waste & Recycling News, December 8.

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Infectious waste in landfill leads to hospital fine

By: May 19th, 2011 Email This Post Print This Post

A New Mexico hospital is having trouble mending its ways with regard to regulated medical waste disposal.

Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center, Santa Fe, NM, has paid $21,400 for violating the state’s Environment Department regulations for improperly disposing of infectious waste, reported Waste Recycling News on May 17.

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New Jersey does its thing for illegal medical waste dumping

By: May 11th, 2011 Email This Post Print This Post

Here’s a “Jersey thing” that shouldn’t be limited to just the Garden State.

A bill that would suspend the license of a doctor who illegally dumps medical waste has unanimously passed the New Jersey Assembly, reports the The Star-Ledger, May 9.

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Medical waste storage: It’s usually a state matter

By: June 21st, 2010 Email This Post Print This Post

A frequently asked question submitted to the OSHA Healthcare Advisor concerns medical waste. The common misconception is that federal OSHA regulates this area.

However, that is only partly true. The OSHA Bloodborne Pathogen standard (1910.1030) addresses exposure hazards to regulated waste particularly at the point of generation, initial containment, bagging, and labeling

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