Three proposed tweaks to ASHRAE’s ventilation standard open for comment

By: April 6th, 2018 Email This Post Print This Post

The American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) is now accepting public comment on a trio of proposed changes to ANSI/ASHRAE/ASHE Standard 170-2017, Ventilation of Health Care Facilities.

Addendum o to Standard 170-2017 is scheduled for public comment until May 7. This “voluntary risk-based approach” to establish “operational ventilation rates for spaces” calls for infection control and prevention professionals to segregate infected persons to both protect them and prevent them from putting others at risk.

Addendum p to Standard 170-2017, also scheduled for public comment until May 7, would update Table 7.1 by, amongst other things, moving requirements for Residential Health, Care, and Support spaces to a new table in a different addendum; relocating and updating filtration requirements; and also revising the “space name terminology, table organization, and subheadings to better correlate with” 2014 FGI Guidelines for Design and Construction of Hospitals and Outpatient Facilities.

Addendum q to Standard 170-2017, scheduled for comment until April 22, would change the scope of the standard by including “resident” to differentiate from “patient” in residential health applications and by clarifying that the standard addresses more than outside air quantities and that it does not establish “comprehensive thermal comfort design requirements,” which are addressed in Standard 55.

This is just a summary of the proposed changes. To access these public review drafts, see a full rundown, and comment, visit ASHRAE’s online database.

Comments

By Margaret Price on April 12th, 2018 at 1:59 pm

1: the link to your online database doesn’t work.

2: If you are talking about ventilation then infection control practices relevant only for infections spread by “droplet/airborne” route, not every infection.

3: Treating patients/residents differently based on infection status is important but must not be over-done, as the patient and family become unnecessarily “stigmatized/embarrassed.

 

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