New report on emergency preparedness says U.S. healthcare system is improving

By: April 18th, 2018 Email This Post Print This Post

We recently published online an article from the upcoming edition of our Healthcare Life Safety Compliance newsletter about a recent report by the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security that examined how the U.S. healthcare system has fared while responding to emergencies both large and small.

Their conclusion? The bigger the emergency, the less prepared healthcare facilities are for handling the crush of patients that come through their doors.

“Although the healthcare system is undoubtedly better prepared for disasters than it was before the events of 9/11, it is not well prepared for a large-scale or catastrophic disaster,” the authors wrote in the report, which was released in late February. “Just as important, other segments of society that support or interact with the healthcare system and that are needed for creating disaster-resilient communities are not sufficiently prepared for disasters.”

Their research, however, spanned from 2010 to 2015, meaning that responses to recent emergencies such as Hurricane Harvey, the wildfires that torched California, the harrowing mass shootings at a country music concert in Las Vegas and at Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida were not examined.

Now a new report has come out, this one concluding that hospital readiness for managing health emergencies has improved over the last five years.

From our colleagues at Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare:

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) this week released the 2018 National Health Security Preparedness Index, which found that the U.S. scored a 7.1 out of 10 for preparedness, up 3% over the last year and almost 11% since the Index was begun in 2013.

The assessment found improvements in most states, but also noted serious inequities in health security across the country, according to a RWJF release. Maryland was the highest scoring state, 25% higher than the lowest-ranked states, Alaska and Nevada. The report found that states in the Deep South and Mountain West scored poorly compared to those in the Northeast and Pacific Coast.

“Five years of continuous gains in health security nationally is remarkable progress,” said Glen Mays, PhD, MPH, who led the University of Kentucky research team that developed the index, in the release. “But achieving equal protection across the U.S. population remains a critical unmet priority.”

The index found that 18 states had preparedness levels exceeding the national average, while 21 states fell below the average. Thirty-eight states and the District of Columbia increased their overall health security last year, with eight remaining steady and four declining.

So, while this new RWJF report suggests that the response of the U.S. healthcare system to emergencies has generally improved in recent years, a lot of work still needs to be done, which aligns with what the authors of the report from the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security wrote a couple of months ago.

Comments

By Ron Psimas on April 19th, 2018 at 2:23 pm

Since a majority of disposable infection control products come from outside the USA, we are not a good position to handle any large or prolonged emergency situation.

 

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