Archive for: March, 2018

Joint Commission shares 2017 standards compliance data for healthcare facilities

By: March 27th, 2018 Email This Post Print This Post

The Joint Commission (TJC) has released its lists, each based on the type of facility surveyed, of the requirements most frequently scored as “not compliant” during accreditation surveys and certification reviews during the 2017 calendar year.

The list of requirements scored as “not compliant” during 1,443 hospital surveys:

  1. LS.02.01.35: Systems for extinguishing fires are provided and its systems/devices are appropriately installed and maintained. (86%)
  2. EC.02.05.01: Utility systems are well designed, inventoried, monitored, and managed according to written procedures when disruptions in the utility system occur. (73%)
  3. LS.02.01.30: Building features are maintained which prevent the spread and fueling of fire and smoke. (72%)
  4. IC.02.02.01: Infection prevention and control activities are performed relative to the cleaning, storing, and disposing of medical equipment/devices. (72%)
  5. EC.02.06.01: Physical environment (e.g., lighting, temperature, ventilation, equipment, furnishings, space, etc.) is safe and functional. (70%)
  6. LS.02.01.10: Effects of fire, smoke, and heat are mitigated through the design and maintenance of building and fire protection features. (66%)
  7. EC.02.02.01: Risks related to hazardous materials and hazardous waste are managed as described in written policy. (63%)
  8. LS.02.01.20: Means of egress are maintained. (62%)
  9. EC.02.05.05: Testing and regular inspections of utilities are done. (62%)
  10. EC.02.05.09: Medical gas and vacuum systems are labeled, tested, inspected, and maintained. (59%)

The list of requirements scored as “not compliant” during 104 surveys of office-based surgery practices:

  1. IC.02.02.01: Infection prevention and control activities are performed relative to the cleaning, storing, and disposing of medical equipment/devices. (63%)
  2. HR.02.01.03: Individuals permitted by law and the organization to practice independently are granted by the practice initial, renewed, or updated clinical privileges. (61%)
  3. EC.02.04.03: Testing and regular inspections of medical equipment are done. (37%)
  4. MM.03.01.01: The hospital’s medications are stored in a manner which maintains their integrity, minimizes their diversion, reduces dispensing error, and promotes availability while following manufacturer guidelines, laws, and regulations. (34%)
  5. IC.02.01.01: Implementation of the written infection surveillance, prevention, and control plan is implemented by the hospital. (27%)
  6. NPSG.03.04.01: Medications, medication containers, and other solutions removed from their original container and placed into a container, both on and off the sterile field, are labeled as consistent with safe medication practices. (24%)
  7. HR.01.06.01: The organization has a competency assessment process in place. (23%)
  8. EC.02.05.07: Emergency power systems are tested, inspected, and maintained as required by the Life Safety Code®. (22%)
  9. WT.04.01.01: Quality control checks are performed as defined in the quality control plan for waived testing. (20%)
  10. MM.01.01.03: High-alert and hazardous medications defined by the hospital are safely managed. (18%)

Study: Antibiotic-resistant infections cost U.S. hospitals $2.2 billion annually

By: March 26th, 2018 Email This Post Print This Post

Editor’s note: A version of this blog post first appeared on the website for BLR’s Patient Safety & Quality Healthcare magazine.

A new study found that in addition to being a deadly killer of patients, and in some cases afflicting healthcare workers, antibiotic-resistant infections cost U.S. hospitals more than $2 billion each year. The study was conducted by researchers from Emory University and Saint Louis University and published in Health Affairs last week.

The researchers cite a Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimate that antibiotic-resistant infections kill 23,000 Americans annually. The study used data from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey to estimate incremental healthcare costs of treating these infections, which the researchers say is the first national estimate of the price tag for this treatment.

The study found that antibiotic resistance adds $1,383 to the cost of treating a patient with a bacterial infection. Taking the estimated number of these infections in 2014, the researchers say the national cost of treatment is $2.2 billion annually.

The findings point to “the need for innovative new infection prevention programs, antibiotics, and vaccines to prevent and treat antibiotic-resistant infections,” the researchers wrote.

New IAHSS guideline aims to help healthcare facilities respond to workplace violence

By: March 20th, 2018 Email This Post Print This Post

Looking to reduce the likelihood of workplace violence in healthcare, the International Association for Healthcare Security & Safety Foundation (IAHSS) released a new Threat Management guideline earlier this month stating that “healthcare facilities should establish a process and multidisciplinary team to identify, assess, validate, mitigate, and respond to threats of violence or other behaviors of concern.”

The multidisciplinary threat management team should, says IAHSS, identify threats and determine their seriousness and severity. Additionally, IAHSS recommends the team develop intervention plans that protect potential victims and address problems that precipitate threats, document the threat assessment process with privacy and confidentiality in mind, and conduct a review after addressing each threat.

The IAHSS guideline suggests the development of a threat management program “that is informed by data and research in this area.” To do so, IAHSS says that healthcare facilities should designate individuals who are responsible for, amongst other things, educating staff and promoting the reporting of threats; assessing all reports of concerning behavior; implementing timely response plans; and advocating for victims and offering support and counseling if needed.

IAHSS says all healthcare staff should get education —  based on their job function and potential risk — about identifying concerning behavior, reporting protocols, activating an emergency response, and documenting threats and incidents.

The new Threat Management guideline was initially developed by the IAHSS Council on Guidelines and incorporated feedback from IAHSS membership, the Emergency Nurses Association, and the American Hospital Association, according to a press release announcing the guideline.

“Implementing the intent of this guideline will be one of the least expensive and effective steps an organization can take to reduce the likelihood of violence,” Tom Smith, chair of the IAHSS Council on Guidelines, said in a statement. “The Threat Management Guideline establishes a framework for healthcare organizations to proactively identify and manage threats of violence. Input from our colleagues at the AHA and ENA helped us enhance the quality and value of the final product.”

The issuing of the guideline comes several months after a report by IAHSS, entitled “Mitigating the Risk of Workplace Violence in Health Care Settings,” encouraged healthcare facilities to take immediate steps to mitigate violent incidents.

Make us even better with your feedback… and maybe win $50 off any HCPro product

By: March 6th, 2018 Email This Post Print This Post

Feedback from safety professionals is essential to us at HCPro as we strive to develop products that help healthcare organizations like yours stay up to date and in compliance, keeping your workers safe. Please take just a few minutes to share your thoughts with us regarding ongoing and new challenges faced by you and your safety colleagues in 2018.

In gratitude for your participation in our survey, you have a chance to win $50 off any product in the HCPro Marketplace. Simply click on the link below to begin the survey. If the click-through does not work, please cut and paste the URL below into the address bar of your browser.

Here’s the link to the survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/2J6FVNC

All your answers are confidential and anonymous. If you have questions related to this survey, please contact me at mvensel@hcpro.com. The deadline to fill out the survey is March 30, 2018.

TJC: Unintended retention of foreign body, falls most common sentinel events in 2017

By: March 1st, 2018 Email This Post Print This Post

The Joint Commission (TJC) on Wednesday released an updated list of its sentinel event statistics for 2017, and you’ll find some familiar medical miscues at the top.

TJC reviewed 805 reports of sentinel events, which it defines as unexpected events that result in death or serious physical or psychological harm to patients. That’s down slightly from a year ago, when they decreased from 934 in 2015 to 824.

The most frequently reported sentinel event was again the unintended retention of a foreign body (116), edging out falls (114). Rounding out the five most common were wrong patient, site, or procedure (95), suicide (89), or delay in treatment (66).

To view the latest sentinel event info, here’s a link to TJC’s quarterly reports.

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