Our expert answers a couple of reader questions related to waste disposal

By: February 19th, 2018 Email This Post Print This Post

When you’ve got healthcare safety or standards questions, we’ve got answers. More specifically, we’ve got a stable of industry experts who are only an email away and are willing and able to give you the guidance you are seeking.

This time, we turned to Dan Scungio, MT(ASCP), SLS, the laboratory safety officer for Sentara Healthcare in Virginia, to answer a pair of waste disposal questions recently posed by our readers. Scungio, aka “Dan, the Lab Safety Man,” writes a monthly column for our monthly Medical Environment Update newsletter.

Question No. 1, from a blog commenter named Sarah Winters: “I am the nursing supervisor for a school district. At the end of every year, the nurses at the schools close and seal their full sharps boxes and transport them in their vehicles to [our] central office, where I then take them to EMS for disposal. A safety/health inspector has told us this is unsafe and violates the OSHA standard. I cannot find how that violates any OSHA regulation. Suggestions? Resources? Thanks.”

Answer from Dan, the Lab Safety Man: “OSHA does not directly regulate the transport of hazardous waste, but the U.S. Department of Transportation does. The DOT states that if you are not in the business of transporting hazardous materials, the process of sharps transport for the schools falls under the DOT’s Materials of Trade exemption. That means it is acceptable to transport used sharps in your private vehicle provided they are packaged in containers constructed of a rigid material that is resistant to punctures and securely closed to prevent leaks. That said, individual state regulations may supersede federal DOT rules, so it is important to know what the transport laws are in your specific state.”

Question No. 2, submitted anonymously via email: “Can we dispose of irrigation fluid from the anterior chamber of the eye in the regular garbage if not visibly contaminated with blood and is self-contained in a sealed bag?”

Answer from Dan, the Lab Safety Man: “Eye irrigation fluid may not be considered an infectious waste if it does not contain blood, but it is probably not a good idea to place it into the regular (non-hazardous) waste stream. It is important to consider those who handle the trash after it leaves your site. If there is breakage of a sealed container or bag that creates an exposure, that would create a scenario that will raise questions for the person exposed and a situation that should be avoided.”

Got a question you’d like answered? Shoot us a note at mvensel@hcpro.com.

Comments

Where are empty, used and unused (bio hazardous/biomedical bags with the Biomedical symbol) supposed to be dispose of, in regular waste or red bag ? Thank you

By Linda Gylland on February 19th, 2018 at 11:59 am

We dispose all biohazard bags in red bag garbage, even if it is an empty bag. Our city landfill refused a load of garbage when they found an empty bag with the biohazard symbol. You could check with your local regulations too.

Thanks for chiming in, Linda!

Denise, you can definitely trust Linda. She’s another of our favorite lab safety experts.

 

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