Report: OSHA losing inspectors under Trump

By: January 8th, 2018 Email This Post Print This Post

Before taking office, President Donald Trump expressed a desire to trim the federal workforce, something he has taken action on since getting sworn in last year.

OSHA is reportedly one of the federal agencies that have been impacted.

According to data obtained by NBC News through a Freedom of Information Act request, OSHA has lost 40 inspectors through attrition since Trump took office last January, and as of October 2, the federal agency had made no new hires to replace them. The 40 vacant positions represent 4% of the OSHA’s total federal inspection force, which fell below 1,000 in early October, according to the NBC News report.

A Labor Department spokesman told NBC News that OSHA has hired “several additional inspectors” since early October and is currently recruiting at least two dozen more. Still, even if OSHA is allowed to fill some of those open positions in the coming months, last year’s hiring lull could affect the agency’s future performance, argued Jordan Barab, an OSHA official under former President Barack Obama.

“Even after OSHA hires someone, they can’t just send them out to do an inspection by themselves,” Barab told NBC News. “This will have an impact for years.”

Meanwhile, due to limited resources and manpower, OSHA is prioritizing high-risk workplaces — such as construction sites and manufacturing plants — with increased rates of fatal accidents, serious injuries, and illnesses, the report said. It is not yet clear how much impact the loss of inspectors has had on the healthcare industry.

Back in May 2017, when the White House released its budget request for 2018 that sought to slash, among other things, the Labor Department’s budget, a cut of about 2% of OSHA’s budget was proposed. We noted at the time that even a modest cut could significantly impair OSHA’s ability to enforce workplace safety regulations.

According to the Labor Department, OSHA from October 2016 to September 2017 actually increased its number of inspections for the first time in five years, NBC News reported. But some activists, politicians, and former OHSA officials argue the loss of on-the-ground inspectors in specific regions expose workers to greater risk.

“OSHA is far too understaffed to fulfill its mandate of reducing workplace injuries,” U.S. Representative Rosa DeLauro, a Democrat from Connecticut, told NBC News. “Under the Trump administration, OSHA has suffered a troubling decline in both staff and work-place inspections in key areas of the country.”


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