Archive for: September, 2017

List of OSHA standards cited most frequently in 2017 released

By: September 28th, 2017 Email This Post Print This Post

Fall protection training requirement makes debut on annual top 10 list

The annual list of most-frequently cited OSHA standards was released this week at the National Safety Center (NSC) Congress & Expo in Indianapolis. Although the list looks pretty similar to years past, there has been some movement.

The general requirements of fall protection (1926.501) ranked first on the list again this year, as it did last year and the year before that. The top five categories, in fact, have held their positions for the past three years.

The hazard communication requirements (1910.1200)—which are especially pertinent to healthcare employers and other industries where workers handle hazardous substances—have held steady as the second-most-frequently cited set of OSHA standards.

Citations related to electrical wiring (1910.305) have continued their downward trend relative to the other top standards, moving from eighth place to 10th in two years. This year’s ninth-place finisher, fall protection training requirements (1926.503), jumped onto the list for the first time in recent memory.

For more detail on the OSHA standards for the past three years, review the chart below. (Or click here for the PDF version.) The numbers associated with each category indicate the number of violations cited under each set of standards. These numbers are based on each fiscal year, and they are considered preliminary. A final report will be published in the December edition of NSC’s Safety+Health magazine.

NSC President and CEO Deborah A.P. Hersman said in a statement that the list of top OSHA violations is “a blueprint for keeping workers safe.”

OSHA-Top10-citations-three-years

Deadline suspended for Missouri hospital facing second ‘immediate jeopardy’ finding this year

By: September 27th, 2017 Email This Post Print This Post

A hospital in Missouri had been given until September 22 to bring its operation into compliance with the CMS Conditions of Participation (CoP) after surveyors last month found significant problems pertaining to nursing services and patient rights. That deadline has been suspended, however, as federal regulators review the findings of a follow-up visit.

State surveyors returned last week to Mercy Hospital Springfield to determine whether the facility has fixed the problems that led to the “immediate jeopardy” findings in August, a spokesperson for the CMS regional office in Kansas City said this week. Suspending the deadline gives CMS time to review what the follow-up surveyors found, the spokesperson said.

In early September, the hospital announced that it had recently fired 12 employees after determining that their behavior in “highly tense situations” had been inadequate. Remaining staff members would receive additional training on de-escalation techniques and preventing patient abuse and neglect, the hospital said. The following week, an interim leadership team stepped in.

“Everything we’re doing is to ensure the well-being and safety of everyone, including our co-workers,” hospital spokesperson Sonya Kullmann said.

Details from the August inspection are not yet publicly available, but records obtained via the Missouri Sunshine Law and the federal Freedom of Information Act indicate that Mercy Hospital Springfield has struggled recently to recognize incidents of possible abuse and neglect. The Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services and CMS each released the findings of a complaint investigation conducted in early January and the hospital’s subsequent plan of correction. (To review the 219 pages of records released by the state, download the PDF.)

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Missouri hospital in ‘immediate jeopardy’ fires 12 workers, installs interim leadership team

By: September 13th, 2017 Email This Post Print This Post

Corrective steps being taken to protect patients and workers alike, hospital says

A hospital in Missouri at risk of losing its Medicare funding within the month installed an interim leadership team this week as it seeks to appease federal inspectors.

Mercy Hospital Springfield was placed in “immediate jeopardy” by CMS after an inspection last month found significant violations of the regulations pertaining to nursing services and patient rights. The hospital announced last week that it had fired 12 employees whose behavior in “highly tense situations” was deemed inadequate. That news was followed Tuesday by an announcement that the interim leaders would step in to right the ship.

“They bring a fresh perspective and will help bolster local resources,” said Jon Swope, interim president of Mercy Springfield Communities, in a statement announcing six temporary leaders.

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Bipartisan bill passes Senate Appropriations Committee, could preserve OSHA funding

By: September 8th, 2017 Email This Post Print This Post

Democrats and Republicans on the Senate Appropriations Committee came together this week to pass a budget plan that would keep federal OSHA funding at the same level in fiscal year (FY) 2018 as is today.

The bill, which addresses spending by Labor, HHS, Education and related agencies, calls for the Labor Department to be funded by $12 billion overall—that’s a slight cut of $61.5 million or about 0.5% from the funding level in FY 2017—according to a summary released by the committee’s Republican members. It passed by a vote of 29-2.

“For the second year in a row, the committee has worked together in a tough fiscal environment to pass a bipartisan bill that reflects Americans’ priorities,” said Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.), chairperson for the subcommittee on Labor and HHS appropriations, in a statement.

Sen. Patty Murray (D-Wash.), ranking member of the subcommittee on Labor, HHS, Education, and related agencies, said in a separate statement that she’s pleased to see bipartisanship at work, though there’s more to be done.

“While I support this bill as a compromise and the best we can do given the inadequate investment levels we’ve been given, it underscores the need for us to keep working toward another budget deal to increase investments in people, communities, and economic growth,” Murray said. “But this bill is a good first step and a strong foundation for continued bipartisan work.”

Labor agencies would fare far better under this Senate appropriations bill than the version under consideration by the House, which proposed even deeper cuts for OSHA’s enforcement budget than President Trump had requested, as Bloomberg BNA’s Bruce Rolfsen reported in July.

Jordan Barab, a former OSHA official and an outspoken critic of the Trump administration, said a flat budget (i.e., no increase in funding) could be the best-case scenario “considering who controls the White House and Congress.”

“Although we’ll end up with strikingly different bills in the Senate and the House, the expectation is that, because the Senate bill is a bi-partisan measure that both parties have agreed on, the current funding is likely to be maintained if there is a final bill,” Barab wrote on his blog, Confined Space. If, he added, Congress were to resort to a continuing resolution rather than passing a final bill, that too would keep funding at about the same levels as they stand today.

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