Archive for: July, 2017

Spruced-up online OSHA form aims to help whistleblowers

By: July 28th, 2017 Email This Post Print This Post

A revised online form backed by OSHA aims to make it easier for whistleblowers to complain about their employers, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced Friday.

Workers still have a right to lodge formal complaints in a number of other ways: snail mail, fax, hand-delivery, verbally on the phone or in person. But the updated web-based filing option offers an interactive option available all day every day, designed help workers navigate the potentially daunting seascape of laws and regulations that keep worker rights afloat.

The whistleblower provisions of some 22 statutes are enforced by OSHA, affecting everything from workplace health and safety to consumer protection and nuclear power. (Details on that are available at www.whistleblowers.gov.)

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Don’t fall prey to imposters peddling OSHA posters

By: July 10th, 2017 Email This Post Print This Post

People posing as OSHA compliance officers have been trying to dupe employers into paying for posters they can get from the government for free, the Utah Labor Commission warned recently.

The scamsters have contacted Utah businesses in person, on the phone, and even in writing, threatening inspections, citations, and fines, unless the employers immediately pay for consultation and training services and the posters. These tactics have popped up in other states as well.

“We encourage employers to research and ask questions about the companies or individuals offering to sell OSHA posters,” said Utah Labor Commissioner Jaceson Maughan in a statement. “They should also know that we provide the posters at no charge.”

The posters, which businesses must display in a prominent location, are available for download from the commission’s website. Real OSHA compliance officers in Utah carry identification and do not collect money, the commission noted.

Last year, a Florida man used his company to dupe newly opened small businesses out of at least $1.3 million, according to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission (FTC). The company sold free posters for $179.99 to $189.99, then made it difficult for customers to obtain refunds, according to the FTC’s complaint.

Jobs report: American healthcare sector keeps growing amid uncertainty

By: July 7th, 2017 Email This Post Print This Post

While the number of people working in construction, manufacturing, and several other major industries held steady last month, the American healthcare sector continued to grow, adding 37,000 jobs in June, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) announced today.

That figure outperformed the average number of healthcare jobs gained monthly all of last year and so far this year, the BLS announcement noted. (The economy added 32,000 healthcare jobs per month, on average, in 2016 and 24,000 jobs per month in the first half of 2017.)

The number of people working in hospitals grew by 12,000 in June, but employment in ambulatory healthcare services grew even faster, with 26,000 jobs added. This reflects a decades-long shift in how and where physicians and their staffs care for patients. More services are being offered in outpatient settings, and some community hospitals, especially in rural areas, have fallen on hard times.

The shifting landscape impacts everything from the way clinics ensure basic environmental cleaning to how health systems strategize with regard to employment and market share. And, of course, it impacts the way OSHA and other regulatory bodies go about protecting workers and the public.

Across all industries, the U.S. economy added 222,000 jobs in June, beating both expectations and recent monthly averages. This bird’s-eye view of the economy, however, misses much of the nuance on the ground level, where many hiring managers are on unsure footing. Healthcare employers, especially, are watching Washington, where the Republican-controlled Congress and White House are struggling to finalize a budget and healthcare plan, as The New York Times reported.

“This is an unprecedented level of political uncertainty,” William E. Spriggs, chief economist for the AFL-CIO union, told the Times. “That is creating a drag on the economy.”

Hiring at medical labs and nursing homes, for instance, has been on the decline, Spriggs said, attributing the slowdown to the number of unknowns in the future of the U.S. healthcare system.

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