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Workers’ Memorial Day: A somber reminder of progress made, work left to do

Posted By Steven Porter On April 28, 2017 @ 12:24 pm In Emergency Action Plans,Featured,General Safety and Health,OSHA - General,Workplace violence prevention | No Comments

Carrie Rouzer was caring for a patient last July at Parrish Medical Center in Titusville, Fla., when a stranger barged in and gunned down both Rouzer, 36, and her 88-year-old patient before being subdued by security guards.

The shocking case, which drew attention to workplace violence as a real threat to healthcare workers, was certainly on the minds of groups who gathered Friday in Jacksonville and Miami in observance of Workers’ Memorial Day [1]. The two sites were among hundreds nationwide holding local ceremonies commemorating the lives of those killed on the job, whether by violence or accidents.

The annual event is held on April 28, the day OSHA was established in 1971, as a reminder of the progress made in workplace safety in recent decades and the work yet to be done. Rouzer’s story, sadly, is among many others collected over the years.

Among the thousands of occupational fatalities recorded across all industries, between 100 and 150 occur in the healthcare and social assistance sectors each year, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In 2015, there were 109. (Finalized numbers for 2016 will be released this December.)

When you consider how many hours workers put in, those 109 fatalities translate to a fatal injury rate of 0.6 per 100,000 full-time equivalent workers. That’s much less than the overall rate across all industries, which was 3.4 in 2015, according to BLS data. Workers in transportation and warehousing, by contrast, suffered a fatal injury rate of 13.8—which is 23 times higher than the rate in healthcare.

Within the healthcare sector, the numbers are broken down into three categories. Ambulatory healthcare services, which saw 47 fatalities in 2015, had a rate of 0.7. Nursing and residential care facilities, which saw 24 fatalities, had a rate of 1.1. And hospitals, which saw 21 fatalities, had a rate of 0.4. All of these numbers are down slightly from rates reported for 2006.

Although the fatal injury rate in healthcare remains low compared to other industries and has declined slightly in recent years, OSHA continues to look for ways to improve safety. Those improvements should be balanced against other considerations. But let’s take Workers’ Memorial Day as an opportunity to reflect on Rouzer’s story and others like it. Are we doing all we can reasonably do to protect workers? Is there more?

BLS-worker-fatality_Page_14 [2]

A summary report on the number and rate of workplace fatalities by industry and sector published by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics groups healthcare with educational services. Full report: https://www.bls.gov/iif/oshwc/cfoi/cfch0014.pdf

 


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URLs in this post:

[1] Workers’ Memorial Day: https://www.osha.gov/workersmemorialday/index.html

[2] Image: http://blogs.hcpro.com/osha/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/BLS-worker-fatality_Page_14.jpg

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