Proper placement and compliance for eyewash stations

By: September 21st, 2016 Email This Post Print This Post

We get lots of reader mail from folks looking for information about eyewash stations, and what OSHA and other accreditation agencies require from healthcare facilities. Healthcare compliance consultant Brad Keyes, CHSP, attempts to explain the complex world of eyewash stations.

When and where are eyewash stations required in a healthcare facility? This is one of the more frequent issues with which healthcare professionals struggle. There is a tendency to place these stations nearly everywhere, but in reality there aren’t as many locations that require eyewash stations as one may think.

Eyewash stations are required wherever there is a possibility that caustic or corrosive chemicals could splash into an individual’s eye. It is important to note that blood and body fluids are not considered to be caustic or corrosive. It is also important to note that the use of personal protective equipment (PPE) such as face shields, glasses or goggles does not exempt a facility from its need for an eyewash station.

Here are some recommendations on evaluating your existing eyewash stations for compliance:

  • In a healthcare setting, eyewash stations are typically found where cleaning chemicals are mixed (such as housekeeping areas), where plant operations take place, and in kitchens, generator rooms, environmental services storage rooms for battery-powered floor scrubbers, in-house laundries, dialysis mixing rooms, and laboratories. Find out whether a risk assessment has been conducted to determine the need for eyewash stations.
  • All required eyewash stations must be the plumbed type, which can operate in one second or less. This means the faucet-mounted type that requires turning the hot water lever and the cold water lever and then pulling a center lever is not permitted.
  • Access to the eyewash station must be within 10 seconds (or 55 feet) of the hazard. The individual seeking an eyewash station may travel through one door to get to an eyewash station, provided the door does not have a lock on it and swings toward the eyewash station.
  • If an eyewash station is observed outside of an area where one is typically needed, ask the staff who work in the area why it is there. See if they have a risk assessment that requires it to be there. Advise them that if there is no valid reason for the eyewash station to be there, it can be removed, which may save them the time and resources spent in maintaining it.
  • Eyewash stations may need to have a mixing valve to maintain a flow of water in the 60 to 100 degrees Fahrenheit range. Ask to see the risk assessment to determine whether a mixing valve is required.
  • Every eyewash station needs to be tested weekly by flowing water to clear any sediment and bacteria. There is no requirement regarding how long the water must flow. Every eyewash station must be inspected annually to determine whether the eyewash station still conforms to the installation parameters. The weekly test and annual inspections must be documented.
  • The presence of eyewash bottles indicates someone in the organization decided it was needed. Investigate and ask why the bottles are located there. Determine whether they need a plumbed eyewash station within 10 seconds’ travel time (or 55 feet) of the perceived hazard. Check the expiration date on the bottles.

Always check with your state and local authorities to determine whether they have any additional requirements.

Comments

By Susan Thomas on September 22nd, 2016 at 2:05 pm

We have the faucet mounted version in our auto clave room and ASC…why is that type not permitted? we are a ortho physician and have an asc. We need clarification and can we have the OSHA standard in writing.

“This means the faucet-mounted type that requires turning the hot water lever and the cold water lever and then pulling a center lever is not permitted.”

Do assisted living facilities fall under the category of Healthcare Facilities related to placement of eye wash stations?

re: Susan – ANSI/ISEA Z358.1 is a national consensus standard that OSHA refers employers to as a recognized source for guidance. The standard has activation specifications that a typical faucet mount eyewash does not meet. The OSHA eyewash standard is CFR 1910.151(c). Some states have their own plans that will be above and beyond federal requirements, so watch for that.

re: Douglas – Yes.

“Under the OSH Act, employers are responsible for providing a safe and healthful workplace. OSHA’s mission is to assure safe and healthful workplaces by setting and enforcing standards, and by providing training, outreach, education and assistance. Employers must comply with all applicable OSHA standards. Employers must also comply with the General Duty Clause of the OSH Act, which requires employers to keep their workplace free of serious recognized hazards.”

https://www.osha.gov/law-regs.html

I work in an outpatient setting and our Infection Control group argues that infectious blood products as well as urine samples can be a risk if splashed in the eyes, therefore saying we need eyewash stations. Any thoughts on that?

Do not forget that the OSHA Formaldehyde Standard (29CFR 1910.1048) also requires eye wash stations in addition to the Caustic and Corrosive locations mentioned above.

Regarding:
Every eyewash station must be inspected annually to determine whether the eyewash station still conforms to the installation parameters.
By whom is the annual inspection to be completed?

It was a nice article, what I understood, eye wash should be inside housekeeping room where chemical are mixed and other storage area of chemical. It is not needed in the wards, although housekeeping staff move in with cleaning chemical, but has low risk. Do you practice to put eyewash on nursing station as a center point, it can help for chemo or Blood body fluid splash. How about disposable bottle of eyewash rather than tap water connected eye wash, although weekly flash in tap water connected might still leave some particles and other maintenance issue-any thought pleas

Are you saying that wall mounted self-contained units can’t be used, or would you consider this to be “plumbed”? I’m not finding this specifically addressed by OSHA, or the ANSI standard.

“All required eyewash stations must be the plumbed type, which can operate in one second or less. This means the faucet-mounted type that requires turning the hot water lever and the cold water lever and then pulling a center lever is not permitted.”

By Indira Jain on February 26th, 2018 at 7:05 pm

Access to the eyewash station must be within 10 seconds (or 55 feet) of the hazard. The individual seeking an eyewash station may travel through one door to get to an eyewash station, provided the door does not have a lock on it and swings toward the eyewash station.- this is incorrect. The ANSI standard says that if the hazard is corrosive, then a door will be considered an obstruction.

By Roxanne Keener on May 27th, 2018 at 5:57 pm

I am building a new assisted living facility. Where are the recommended eyewash stations – med room and janitors closet where chemicals are stored?

By Roxanne Keener on May 27th, 2018 at 6:00 pm

In an assisted living facility, does there need to be a braille door sign/sign indicating there is an eyewash station?

I am also wondering the answer about the Assisted living question by Roxanna Keener. ‘For an assisted living facility where would eye wash stations be required. Thanks

By lori brown on January 5th, 2019 at 6:33 pm

Hello,
I am in the process of opening OBL. What type of Eye wash stations are required.
Previous mounted to the facets in nursing area autoclave room. What are your suggestions?

Thanks,
Lori Brown NP-C, MSN, RN, BA
Unique Interventional Radiology

So when is an eye wash station that is connected to the faucet and you have to turn the hot and cold valves on and then pull the button permissible? When you are not within 55 feet of a hazard …or never?
Are hand held eyewash bottles allowed at all?

Is there any standard on moving an eyewash station from it’s original location? The maintenance person at my company wants to put the eyewash station on a mobile carriage so it can be moved around. I think this is a terrible idea. I think the station should be installed on the wall in one location and left there.

My eyewash stations at my facility keep being removed or blocked due to construction in the room the eyewash is located. I perform the eyewash check every week. Due to the construction I can not perform my check and further more; I believe the eyewash is being disconnected well renovations are being done. Should the eyewash not be tampered with?

Can an eyewash station be installed in an operating room?

 

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