Safety officer tip: Enjoy recordkeeping exemptions—while you have them

By: February 6th, 2012 Email This Post Print This Post

Be grateful for the little things. While hospitals and long-term care facilities are busy this month posting workplace injuries to meet the federal OSHA posting requirements, you don’t have to—that is, as long as you understand the recordkeeping exemptions for your type of healthcare facility.

OSHA requires most businesses to post a summary of the previous year’s injuries on the OSHA 300-A form from February through April “in a conspicuous place or places where notices to employees are customarily posted,” according to the OSHA Recordkeeping Handbook.

Whereas some healthcare facilities are exempt from posting, others are not. You must post if your business is a nursing and personal care facility, hospital, or home healthcare service. Facilities that don’t need to post include offices or clinics of medical doctors (that includes ambulatory surgery centers), dentists, and osteopathic physicians; offices of other health practitioners; medical and dental laboratories; and health and allied services.

If you do business in a state operating its own OSHA program, check with the injury posting requirements as not every state has adopted the federal recordkeeping exemption.

Comments

By Bruce Cunha on February 7th, 2012 at 9:24 am

Does this make any sense at all? We are an 8,000+ employer and yet we are technically exempt as we are a Clinic? We are still required to use the OSHA 300 because the Bureau of Labor Statistics requires us to report. So, we post anyway just so staff have information on our incidents.

Just another of those silly regulations.

Is a county jail infirmary exempt. What happens when no one reports to the Burea of labor statistics even though they were worthy to be workmans comp cases.

What about inmate injuries working doing duties at a jail and a Workman’s comp injury is determined?

By C Hutchinson on February 8th, 2012 at 10:09 am

This is a record-keeping question of sorts……We keep logs (records) for autoclave, counter cleaning, eyewash station checks, fire extinguisher checks, etc. How long do we have to keep these logs (records)? Would we just have to show that we are currently checking, cleaning and doing required maintenance?

 

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