RSSAll Entries Tagged With: "nurse-to-nurse hostility"

Kathleen Bartholomew’s “Lessons from Nursing to the World”

Enjoy this Ted Talk given by HCPro author Kathleen Bartholomew. Listen to Kathleen discuss the importance of dismantling the nursing hierarchy that can devalue and shame caregivers and creating an atmosphere of open communication and respect between caregivers which ultimately improves patient care.

 

Editor’s Pick: Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility: Why Nurses Eat Their Young and Each Other, 2e

The American Nurses Association (ANA) has recommended the second edition of Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility: Why Nurses Eat Their Young and Each Other, by Kathleen Bartholomew, RN, MN, in its official position statement on Incivility, Bullying, and Workplace Violence as a resource for nurses. Now in its second edition, the cornerstone work has just been released as an eBook and offers 4 continuing education credits (CEU).

Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility, Second Edition

The first and most respected book showing new and experienced nurses how to build a better workplace by facing and overcoming horizontal hostility is now updated.

Find out why this book is a best-seller and how it’s empowered thousands of nurses to create positive change for themselves and their peers!

Revised to reflect current research on horizontal hostility in the nursing field (also known as lateral violence), Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility, Second Edition, provides staff nurses and their managers with techniques to create a workplace that promotes team relationships and career development while preventing burnout.

Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility provides staff nurses and their managers with the knowledge they need to:

  • Identify verbal abuse, bullying, and other detrimental behaviors
  • Develop responses to defuse or head off such behaviors
  • Create positive alternatives to hostility

These skills support the success of the individual nurse, the unit, and patient care quality at a time when healthcare systems are publicly ranked on patient experience and outcomes.

Horizontal hostility, also known as bullying or lateral violence, is a major factor in nursing attrition rates. Healthcare organizations that don’t proactively create a healthy workplace face the expense of finding, hiring, and training new nurses to replace burned-out staff.

This book provides the following benefits:

  • Skills: Nurses will learn skills for identifying and responding to verbal abuse, bullying, and other detrimental behaviors that undermine individual nurses, the unit, and the quality of patient care.
  • Real-world examples: Gain insightful reflections from individual nurses who have experienced horizontal hostility, presented in their own voices.
  • Author voice: Kathleen Bartholomew is a beloved nursing author who is authoritative yet approachable and always respectful.
  • Scholarship: Extensive references draw on the latest empirical and theoretical literature concerning horizontal hostility.
  • Culture change: Improve nurse retention, nurse productivity, and hospital rankings with an improved environment for patient care.

For more information or to order, visit the HCPro Marketplace.

What to know about new nurses: Tackling Turnover

Hiring a competent nurse staff is only half the battle. The other half is keeping them. A new study published in Nursing Ethics found the turnover rates for RNs is 16.5%, with each resignation costing a hospital between $44,380 to $63,400 a nurse. Furthermore, newly licensed nurses scored lower on job satisfaction and were more likely to leave their job within two years.

The Nursing Ethics report found that intergenerational conflict was a big part of nurse dissatisfaction; with millennials, Gen Xers, and baby boomers butting heads at the hospital.

“Younger generation nurses feel like they don’t have power over their practice, they’re not in charge, and that is logical because they are novice practitioners,” study author Charleen McNeill said in a press release. “However, they bring a knowledge of technology that seasoned nurses may lack. In turn, more experienced nurses support the clinical learning and professional role formation of new nurses. Successful nurse-leaders find ways to garner the strengths of each generation of nurses to achieve the best patient outcomes.”

McNeill said instead of looking at it as conflict, nurse-leaders need to leverage the strengths of each generation and determine strategies to empower all generations of nurses. Their research suggested a strong correlation between professional values and career development. They also found that both job satisfaction and career development correlated positively with nurse retention.

“The work culture that leaders create – the environment that nurses are working in – is the most important thing related to retention,” McNeill said. “It’s very expensive to hire new nurses. When we have good nurses, we want to keep them so we need to understand what’s important to keep them.”

For more tips on retention, conflict resolution and recruitment, check out the following articles from our Strategies for Nurse Managers site!

Help us send a nurse to Dr. Oz!

Kathleen Bartholomew RNDr. Oz is searching for a nurse to join his core team of experts on his television show and we think we know the perfect nurse!

Kathleen Bartholomew, RN, MN, is a nationally recognized expert on healthcare communication and patient safety. She is the author of the groundbreaking books Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility: Why Nurses Eat Their Young and Each Other and Speak Your Truth: Proven Strategies for Effective Nurse-Physician Communication. She’s extremely well respected by other nurses, is considered a thought leader, and has spoken to tens of thousands of nurses and healthcare leaders in speeches, conferences, and seminars across the world.

If you’re interested in nominating Kathleen, copy and paste the link below into a web browser. Kathleen’s email address is kathleenbart418@gmail.com.

http://www.doctoroz.com/page/nominate-your-favorite-nurse-nursesearch?utm_source=Campaign+Created+2015%2F10%2F03%2C+2%3A34+AM&utm_campaign=Dr+Oz+Promo&utm_medium=email

Rock Your Heath: Stress release tip to show your nurses you care

Has work got you and your nurses operating on overload? Sometimes we need a wake-up call before we are willing to change and it usually manifests itself as pain resulting from stress. Headaches, neck and shoulder pain, back aches, indigestion, insomnia, and other ails.

What signs are you experiencing that might indicate stress overload and imbalance?

It’s time to re-assess your situation and start some self-care practices. Here is one idea I love and if you do this for your staff, they will really appreciate you.

Get a crock pot and fill it with water. Add many washcloths to soak up all the water and then put the crock pot on low so the wash clothes get nice and warm. [more]

And the survey says… Staff retention (try to break these 20 habits)

This week I have the pleasure of reading the incredible responses we received to our Nurses Week 2015 survey. So many of you shared your insights, challenges, and hopes for the coming year—thank you! We’ll be emailing the winners of copies of Kathleen Bartholomew’s Team-Building Handbook: Improving Nurse-to-Nurse Relationships in the next couple of days. Keep your eyes peeled for our email.

Your generous responses help us understand your needs and aspirations, and we will try to return the favor by covering those important topics in this blog and in our upcoming books, webinars, and e-learning. For starters, I’ve revived a popular post from the past that deals with retention, identified by many of you as a top priority. Let me know if you recognize any of the 20 bad habits in yourself!

Retain staff by breaking these 20 bad habits

Peter Druker, often called the Father of Modern Management, made the following observation, “We spend a lot of time teaching managers what to do. We don’t spend enough time teaching them what to stop. Half the leaders I’ve met don’t need to learn what to do–they need to learn what to stop.” We simply need to [more]

Enter our nursing survey: You could win a team-building handbook!

Our mission is to provide you with essential tools, articles, tips, and books to support your practice… and we want you to tell us what you need. What kind of challenges do you face? What subjects excite you? Please take a few minutes to answer our 10 question survey, and give us your wish list!

THINTN coverTo thank you for participating in our Nurses Week survey, you also
have an opportunity to win a copy of Kathleen Bartholomew’s
Team-Building Handbook: Improving Nurse-to-Nurse Relationships.
Just complete the survey between now and midnight on May 27, 2015, and provide your contact information on the last page.

Click on the link below to begin the survey:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/hcpronurses2015

All of your answers are confidential and anonymous, and your contact info will only be used to let you know if you won a handbook. If you have questions related to the survey, please contact cmoore@hcpro.com.

Thank you!

——RECENT POSTS——

⇒ 5/4: Who inspires you? There’s still time to submit your favorite quotes in posted comments, here.

⇒ 5/6: You can still use the 20% Nurses Week discount offered in this post.

Nurse Leader Insider ~ Free E-Zine

NurseLeaderEnvelope The HCPro Nurse Leader Insider newsletter contains news
and articles, plus links to free tools for nurse managers.
Sign up here to have this insightful newsletter delivered
(for free!) to your email inbox every Friday.

 

Nurses Week giveaway: Free excerpt from Ending Nurse-To-Nurse Hostility and a chance to win a copy!

HCPro has celebrated nurses all week long with special giveaways, prizes, and promotions.

We are giving away an exclusive excerpt from the brand-new edition of Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility!

In this excerpt, Kathleen Bartholomew, RN, MN, is shining a light on horizontal hostility in nursing school. Read about the effect of horizontal hostility and bullying in nursing school and the positive ways nursing students can be supported and mentored as they begin their nursing career.

Download the excerpt here.

Plus you can also enter to win a free copy of the book!

We are giving away five copies of Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility. Be among the first to read the newly updated book from nursing communication expert Kathleen Bartholomew, RN, MN.

Almost 50% of former nurses cite horizontal hostility as their reason for leaving the profession. Beat the statistics! Read this groundbreaking book and discover all-new strategies and solutions to improve the nursing culture at your organization.

Enter here for your chance to win.

Discrimination settlement reveals underlying diversity issues

Earlier this week, a language discrimination settlement–thought to be the largest of its kind in the healthcare industry–awarded $975,000 to immigrant Filipino healthcare workers in California who claimed they endured “harassment and humiliation” from coworkers and management, according to a recent article in the Los Angeles Times.  Nurses involved in the case, which was filed in 2010 against Delano Regional Medical Center in Kern County, Calif., alleged that the hospital forbade them from speaking any language other than English in public spaces such as hallways and break rooms. The nurses also reported being followed by other employees, who would harass them and mock their accents.  One employee claimed that a former hospital executive threatened the nurses with suspension or termination if they were caught speaking their native language.

According to the Los Angeles Times article, Delano Regional Medical Center employs healthcare workers who speak several other languages, including Spanish, Hindi, and Bengali, yet singled out Filipino employees. The terms of the settlement require the hospital to conduct anti-discrimination training and to enforce reporting and handling of discrimination complaints, which will be reviewed by an outside monitor. The hospital denies the claims and stated that it settled the lawsuit to avoid wasting financial resources.

Just a few weeks ago, The Leaders’ Lounge reported on an initiative at George Washington University to attract a more diverse group of students to the nursing profession. We followed up with a poll on StrategiesforNurseManagers.com asking readers how diverse they consider their organizations. Of those who responded, 34% said their staff is not very diverse and 40% replied that their staff is somewhat diverse.  Only 26% of respondents consider their staff to be very diverse.

It seems that establishing a staff that reflects the diverse patient population is an issue that many organizations face, and the lawsuit in California shows that it is not enough to simply attract nurses from different ethnic and economic backgrounds. Employees and leaders alike must receive diversity training, and issues of discrimination / harassment should not be tolerated. A workforce that is divided by prejudice and hostility is a workforce that fails to work together to meet goals for patient safety and high quality healthcare.