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End of summer nursing roundup

Nurses are finding new and innovative ways to help those in need around the world, but not every nurse can live up to that standard. Here are some of the best and worst stories in nursing this summer.

The Good:

University of Victoria researcher Kelli Stajduhar, a palliative care nurse, is leading the charge on healthcare for the homeless in her community. Because of the many barriers for homeless people to get healthcare, Stajduhar wants to go to them and provide healthcare where they are: downtown, in shelters, or in a housing complex. She thinks that outreach can improve the lives of the homeless, and get them the care they need. (Source: CBC)
Another nurse is looking for new ways to help the most vulnerable: Dawn Bounds, a nursing professor at Rush University College of Nursing, has published her extensive research on sex trafficking in the U.S. This research has the potential to save lives of at-risk young girls, and Bounds is planning to use this research to implement a runaway intervention program in Chicago. (Source: Nurse.com)

The Bad:
A New Jersey nurse broke the cardinal rule of healthcare when she was caught on video stabbing a disabled child with a needle six times. The nurse used physical abuse to control the autistic boy’s behavior, threatening him with the needle and other physical violence according to reports. (Source: The AP)
Nursing is often considered the most trustworthy profession, but this story might undermine that reputation. A nurse manager at St. Richard’s Hospital in the UK pled guilty to the theft of a dying man’s watch. The man’s Submariner Rolex was a family heirloom, and the nurse manager plead guilty to the stealing the watch after them man was admitted to the ED after suffering a heart attack.  (Source: The Argus)

Summer Nursing Roundup

Summer is here, so it’s time to explore some of the best—and worst—nursing stories from the past few months.

Nurses included in healthcare fraud takedown: The department of Health and Human Services (HHS) led a nationwide takedown on health care fraud schemes involving $900 million in false billings. 301 individuals, including nurses, doctors, and other medical professionals, were charged in this in this fraud takedown, the largest in history. Charges included conspiracy to commit healthcare fraud, kickbacks, money laundering and identity theft. (Source: Department of Justice)

Nurses are never off duty—even on their wedding day: Julie Stroyne, a trauma nurse from UPMC Presbyterian Hospital in Pittsburgh, was leaving her wedding to start her new life when she heard people yelling for help. Dropping her bouquet, she rushed into action to help an unconscious woman on a nearby park bench. She performed mouth-to-mouth resuscitation on the woman in her wedding dress, saving the woman’s life before the paramedics arrived. (Source: Today)

Dean of Nursing moonlights as a comedian, for the kids: Gloria Ferraro Donnelly, the 74-year-old dean of Drexel’s College of Nursing came up with an unexpected way to raise money for students: a stand-up comedy routine. Dressed in a t-shirt, yoga pants and sweatbands with a water bottle tied around her waist, the dean’s comedy routine called “The Quest for Physical Perfection,” has raised almost $65,000 for the student emergency fund since 2010. Though she’s retiring this year, Donnelly hopes to continue her comedy career to continue raising money for the fund. (Source: Philly.com)