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Let’s send Kathleen Bartholomew to Oz!

Editor’s note: The below post is authored by Kathleen Bartholomew, RN, MN, who is hoping to represent the profession of nursing as the nurse expert on the Dr. Oz show. Dr. Oz is conducting a nationwide search to find the perfect nurse to join his team and is accepting nominations. Visit the webpage at the bottom of this post to nominate Kathleen.
Kathleen Bartholomew RN
I am on a journey to make healthcare better.

For 15 years I have dedicated my life to empowering nurses and understanding the hidden forces that threaten our identity and potential. What would happen if your patients understood not only their pivotal role in healing, but also the real work of nursing? The trajectory of illness and disease in this country would be radically altered.

As a mother of five children, I have the life experiences that resonate with the general public at a gut level. As an author of five books on the healthcare culture, I have the understanding and expertise to be a voice for this noble profession. And as a seasoned public speaker, I have collected stories from across this nation that poignantly reflect not only nurses’ reality, but the experiences of many of our patients as well.
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Help us send a nurse to Dr. Oz!

Kathleen Bartholomew RNDr. Oz is searching for a nurse to join his core team of experts on his television show and we think we know the perfect nurse!

Kathleen Bartholomew, RN, MN, is a nationally recognized expert on healthcare communication and patient safety. She is the author of the groundbreaking books Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility: Why Nurses Eat Their Young and Each Other and Speak Your Truth: Proven Strategies for Effective Nurse-Physician Communication. She’s extremely well respected by other nurses, is considered a thought leader, and has spoken to tens of thousands of nurses and healthcare leaders in speeches, conferences, and seminars across the world.

If you’re interested in nominating Kathleen, copy and paste the link below into a web browser. Kathleen’s email address is kathleenbart418@gmail.com.

http://www.doctoroz.com/page/nominate-your-favorite-nurse-nursesearch?utm_source=Campaign+Created+2015%2F10%2F03%2C+2%3A34+AM&utm_campaign=Dr+Oz+Promo&utm_medium=email

The unofficial whistleblower flowchart for nurses

Last week, a whistleblower lawsuit was filed by Kim Cheely, a nurse manager at Georgia Regents Medical Center prior to being fired last October for “insubordination.” In this case, “insubordination” appears to mean that the trusted, 37-year veteran of GRMC dogged management to address quality-of-care concerns related to repeated staff reductions in the oncology and bone marrow transplant units.

The story in The Augusta Chronicle documents a situation where anything that could go wrong, did. Cheely took every logical step she could to affect change, and thought she would be protected from retaliation by invoking the hospital’s conflict resolution policy. This did not turn out well for Cheely, unfortunately. In fact, to be protected as a whistleblower, you must report to the state or national agency responsible for regulation of your employer.

For anyone considering blowing whistleblower flowchartthe whistle, take a look at the flowchart I created from advice offered on the ANA website. The chart, which illustrates just the bare bones, will be available for download later in the week, in case you want to share it with your colleagues.

On a related note: I’m currently reading draft chapters for an upcoming HCPro book, The Nurse Manager’s Legal Companion, by a wonderful nurse and attorney, Dinah Brothers. We’ll also have a handbook for staff nurses. Neither is available for preorder quite yet, but I’ll be sure to let you know when they are.

Budget Item: Skis and Snowshoes for Nurses?

RN SkierThe New England winter of 2015 has made headlines across the country. According to The Boston Globe, some hospitals had to rely on the Boston police to deliver essential staff members to work, and taxis to take patients home.

The Globe also reported that “some managers at Mass. General went door-to-door on their drive into the city, picking up as many colleagues as their cars could handle, and other staffers slept overnight on mattresses in the hospital’s conference rooms because they worried they wouldn’t make it back in Tuesday.” And Boston Medical Center’s spokeswoman Ellen Slingsby reported “numerous staff members who have walked considerable distances or even skied into work in order to be here for our patients.”

Which brings me to the title of this blog. Somewhere in next year’s operational budget, nurse managers in the snowier states should consider adding funding for skis and snowshoes for staff.

The ROI is clear: Better staffing during blizzards and a healthier, more athletic staff.

Tip of the month: Guidelines for using social media as background checks

By Shelley Cohen

Custom writing sevice

The Internet has proved to be a great resource to managers with the greatest challenge seeming to be finding the time to research all that is available to us. Along with medical and nursing resources, the Internet has become a social highway for individuals as well as organizations.

As the generation gap continues to grow, managers are continuously amazed to hear of personal concerns being posted to social networks such as Facebook. On one hand, some of these sites may provide an opportunity for “pre-screening” job applicants. On the other hand, we see the benefit of looking up a prospective applicant and finding out they are a source for purchasing drugs or the real reasons they were fired from their last job.  A question raised on the other side of this is one of discriminatory action. What if you declined to hire a person based on a social networking site story about them and you later find out, the posting was unreliable?

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Preserve the Image of Nursing: New TV series jeopardizes nursing image

For years, nurses have been battling how the nursing profession and nurses are portrayed in the media. Having to go against the nursing stereotypes on display in programs such as “Grey’s Anatomy” and “House, M.D.” makes the job that much harder, as patients and families are familiar with the popular television shows.

Now, nurses will have to add another television show to the list that puts their image in jeopardy. MysticArt Pictures has issued a casting call for the new “sexy docu-series” called “Cali Nurse.” According to the casting call, the show is looking for “gorgeous” young females (ages 21-30 only) who will experience “comedy, romance, and fun” and are all about “big hearts” and “dates with McDreamy.” [more]

A picture is worth 1,000 words: Tell your nursing story in photos

In a continuing effort to recognize nurses, the Center to Champion Nursing in America (CCNA) is requesting high quality photos that depict nurses’ work and the relationships they form with patients and families. The winning photograph will be featured in an AARP print and/or web publication.

CCNA hopes to gather images of nurses across all healthcare settings in professional practice and leadership roles, as well as in recruitment and retention activities, and nursing education.

The contest is running through June 25, 2010, and all rules can be found by clicking here.

Even if your submission is not a winner, all qualifying photos will be featured in the CCNA’s new public repository of images.

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Twin Cities nurses prepare for strike

After months of negotiations, nurses in Minneapolis and St. Paul, MN, have voted and authorized a one-day strike to take place on June 1 at 14 metro hospitals because nurses and healthcare officials could not settle on a new contract that satisfies both parties.

The vote consisted of 9,000 nurses of the 12,000 in the hospital system, with 90% voting to reject pension and labor proposals from the hospitals. Prior to the vote, nurses and healthcare executives tried to reach an agreement to no avail. Each party stood strong in its beliefs and the nurses felt they had no choice but to strike.

The Twin Cities Daily Planet summed up some of the issues discussed, which ranged from patient care to pension. [more]

Nurses speak out against “naughty nurse” image

For years, nurses have been fighting an uphill battle to change the way the public views them as professionals. With television shows like Nurse Jackie, Grey’s Anatomy, and Mercy each portraying nurses in a different light, it’s no wonder the public’s view of nurses is skewed. Even the phrase “naughty nurse” has the public believing female nurses should be wearing white stockings, a short skirt, and heels while attending to their patients.

In an effort to change this belief, nurses around the world are speaking out against Mariah Carey’s recent music video for her song “Up Out My Face.” Nurses want Carey to reconsider the video, in which Carey and fellow pop star and rapper Nicki Minaj are wearing white stockings and high heels. [more]

The Truth about Nursing releases best and worst nurse portrayals of the decade

It seems with every passing year more television shows portray nurses in a different light, as talk shows and different healthcare associations express varying opinions on nurses in the hospital system. If you tune into Showtime, Nurse Jackie will blow you away while popping pain medication. However, if you visit the American Medical Association you might read a negative comment on advanced practice nurses.

Responding to the varying shows in the media that portray nurses, The Truth about Nursing released a list showcasing the ten best and worst media portrayals of nurses between 2000 and 2009. [more]