RSSAll Entries Tagged With: "Evidence-based practice"

Relationship of Nursing Excellence to Evidence Based-Practice

For many years, the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program® (MRP) has been synonymous with environments in which nurses prefer to practice and patients achieve the best outcomes. Nurses that are retained in a Magnet-accredited hospital are involved directly in making choices on patient care, and they are active in contributing to healthcare changes based on EBP. “A growing body of research indicates that Magnet hospitals have higher percentages of satisfied RNs, lower RN turnover and vacancy, improved clinical outcomes, excellent nurse autonomy and decision-making capabilities, and improved patient satisfaction” (Drenkard, 2010, p. 264). Brown (2009) wrote, “Evidence-based practice (EBP) is recognized by the healthcare community as the gold standard for providing safe and compassionate care. It is an essential component of any organization having achieved MRP status.”

You can think about this information when you address the need for EBP support at your facility. EBP’s central importance to nursing excellence and its flagship status at any organization deemed worthy of MRP designation indicates that EBP support should move out of the category of “nice to have” and into the category of “need to have.”

Recognizing quality patient care, nursing excellence, and innovations in professional nursing practice, the MRP program provides consumers with the ultimate benchmark to measure the quality of care they can expect to receive. When U.S. News & World Report published its annual showcase of America’s Best Hospitals, designation as an MRP facility contributed to the total score for quality of inpatient care. In 2013, 15 of the 18 medical centers on the exclusive U.S. News Best Hospitals in America Honor Roll, and all 10 of the U.S. News Best Children’s Hospital Honor Roll, are ANCC Magnet-recognized organizations (ANCC, 2014).

MRP designation is based on quality indicators and standards of nursing practice as defined by the American Nurses Association’s Scope and Standards for Nurse Administrators (2009). The Scope and Standards for Nurse Administrators and other foundational documents form the base upon which the MRP environment is built. The designation process includes the appraisal of qualitative factors in nursing, and these factors, referred to as the 14 Forces of Magnetism, were first identified through research conducted in 1983. The 14 Forces were reconfigured under 5 Model Components in 2008, which places a greater focus on measuring outcomes.

The full expression of MRP designation embodies a professional environment guided by a strong visionary nursing leader who advocates and supports development and excellence in nursing practice. As a natural outcome of this, the program elevates the reputation and standards of the nursing profession.

Source: Evidence-Based Practice Made Simple

Strategies for implementing evidence-based practices: Journal clubs

If you’re looking for ways to get your staff engaged and current on the latest evidence-based practices, then you should consider starting a journal club, a regular meeting of staff members to discuss articles from nursing journals. It’s a great way to improve your staff’s reading habits and critical thinking while promoting cooperation and teamwork.

To start your club, you need to choose someone to select readings. A master’s-prepared nurse specialist or educator would be an ideal candidate to lead the group, but anyone with the proper knowledge or enthusiasm would make a fine choice. They should endeavor to select readings that are informative, relevant, and accessible to encourage nurses of all levels to participate. They should start by selecting a guide to critical reading, so everyone has the tools to discuss the articles. Once they’ve selected the article, make sure the reading is easily obtainable and give plenty of advanced notice to ensure everyone has time to read it.

The biggest hurdle for starting a journal club in a healthcare environment is finding time in your staff’s busy schedule. Ideally, you want to find a time that works for everyone, perhaps during a shared break or change of shift. If this proves too daunting, you can always create a virtual journal club. You could use a hospital intranet, email list, or even a chat forum to discuss the readings.

Once you get everyone together, encourage them to think about the article critically and ask them to evaluate it. Here’s a great list of questions to start discussions and get the group thinking about the reading.

If you find that your group has lost momentum or attendance is waning over time, try providing incentives for attendees. Small perks or competitions can be a great way to encourage attendance and let your group have some fun!

Here are some helpful links to get you started!

Running an effective journal club

From the desk of Adrianne Avillion, DEd, RN

Who should facilitate journal clubs?

Help nurses critique journal articles

Do you have a journal group at your facility? We’d love to hear about your experiences in the comments below!

Evidence-Based Practice: Share your journey

Do you have an EBP story to share?

For nurses just getting started with evidence-based practice, the steps between deciding on an area to research and implementing a plan for improvement can be overwhelming. Identifying sources of qualified research, interpreting the results, translating procedures from theory to practice… It’s complicated, to say the least.

I’m looking for a few brave souls who would be willing to share what I’m calling “EBP notes from the field.” If you’ve gone through the process from start to finish, would you be willing to share ebpnotesyour story? I see these as 1-2 pages looking into the decision making process, the research you chose, the steps you took to get buy-in from management. What did you learn in the process? How did you implement your research? Have you been able to measure the results?

I’d like to include a few of these stories in an upcoming book project: a simple EBP guide for working professionals. It will be very practical, straightforward, and [more]

Nursing research: Understanding whistleblowing

Last week I promised a downloadable version of the whistle imagewhistleblower flowchart. For those who are interested, you can access the file here.

When I read about the fallout on Kim Cheely, the nurse whistle-
blower I wrote about last week, I had to ask myself:
Why do nurses risk their jobs to blow the whistle? Why speak out, when there is danger of ostracism, marginalization, and damage to one’s career? I did a bit more research on the subject, and ran across a thought-provoking study published “down under” a few years ago in the Journal of Advanced Nursing. You may find it interesting also.

Using a qualitative narrative inquiry design, the Understanding whistleblowing: Qualitative insights from nurse whistleblowers study looked into the reasons nurses decided to become whistleblowers, and gathered insights into nurses’ experiences of being whistleblowers. I doubt any nurses reading this will be surprised to learn the primary reason behind the decision to blow the whistle.

It’s simple, nurses are patient advocates. Of course there’s much more to the study, and it makes interesting reading for many reasons, not the least of which is that it used face-to-face data collection methods, and based queries on real experiences and not hypothetical scenarios.

In other words, the questions didn’t ask “what would you do” if you faced with wrongdoing. The subjects of this study had worked through the tough decisions and lived through actual whistleblowing events. You can access the report on this study here.

 

March 19 is Certified Nurses Day!

Congratulations to all Certified Nurses out there! Obtaining a national board certification in your specialty takes hard work and a commitment to professional excellence. It demonstrates that you have advanced skills and knowledge that enables you to provide a deeper level of patient care and ensure improved patient outcomes.

In your time in nursing, have you seen an increase in the number of nurses who obtain their professional certification? If you have a certification, how has it changed your practice?

Leave a comment below and let us know.

Evidence-Based Practice: A Soundtrack for Nurses

At HCPro, we offer extensive resources designed to help the nursing community build evidence-based practice (EBP) skills and refine strategies for incorporating EBP in daily practice.

EBP Video Clip

From Viva La Evidence, James McCormack

You can find free resources here and purchase books
and videos, including Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing: A Guide to Successful Implementation, here.

What we lack, however, is a musical EBP score to accompany those resources… For that, you’ll have to visit YouTube and view James McCormack’s Viva La Evidence, a parody of Coldplay’s Viva La Vida that sings the praises of evidence-based practice. Enjoy!

Evidence-based practice vs. nursing research

Judging by the number of people who search our site for an explanation of the relationship of evidence-based practice to nursing research, I thought that you might appreciate the following visual “cheat sheet” of these two important concepts. Both evidence-based practice and nursing research are vital parts of the journey to designation as an ANCC Magnet Recognition Program® organization.

Go to our Reading Room to find this table and the article that inspired it, Evidence-Based Practice and Nursing Research: Avoiding Confusion.

3-4-2015 4-06-40 PM

 

*MRP requires its organizations to show that nurses routinely employ evidence-based research to inform and improve their practice, and that nurses within the organization are conduct original research and share those findings with the nursing community.

Join an online journal club

Starting a journal club is a great way to read articles that will help update practice. Journal clubs consist of groups of nurses who meet regularly to discuss and critique research articles appearing in scientific journals. Creating one is a good way to get started in evidence-based nursing practice.

An alternative to forming a journal club at your facility is to join an online club that is already established. Some nursing associations and nursing journals offer journal clubs in which a journal article—whether published in that journal or not—is critiqued. [more]

Get nursing research underway at your facility

Research is a high-focus area in nursing departments across the country. It is highly emphasized in the 2008 ANCC Magnet Recognition Program® Application Manual, which was released in October. In the new manual, the 14 Forces of Magnetism are now structured under 5 Model Components. Nursing research falls under Component IV: New knowledge, innovations, and improvements, and Component V: Empirical outcomes. Specifically, nurses are expected to conduct research projects. [more]