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Happy Nurses Week: A thank you to our favorite nurses

Is there any doubt that nurses heal the spirit, as well as HappyNursesWeekthe body?

The stories in The Boston Globe annual “Patients Salute Their Nurses” piece offer an inspiring and humbling testament to all the nursing profession can be.

In 400 thank-you letters from grateful patients, family members, and colleagues, Boston’s nurses received personal acknowledgment and messages of love inspired by their deep commitment to the profession and their patients.

Here are snippets from some of my favorite letters:

Diane goes above and beyond, treating me with dignity and respect, even calling me weekly to check on my weight and well-being. Like a friendly drill sergeant, she reminds me to keep my weight down and to pay attention to what I eat.

Joe provided intense, meticulous, and sensitive care not only to Mike, but also to his extended family. Joe’s quiet and steady presence gave us hope and strength when we needed it most. Mike did not make it through the night, but the blow of his passing was softened by the gift of time that Joe made possible.
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Nurses Week: Your 20% sneak peek savings

HCPro is celebrating and recognizing nurses all week long with special giveaways, prizes, and promotions, but we don’t want to wait until Wednesday to start the celebration!

Starting today, you can use our special Nurses Week 2015 catalog coverdiscount code to save on any and all nursing books, videos, and webinars… Just use discount code NRSWK2015 at checkout to receive 20% off your selections.

Download and browse our 2015 catalogue of resources for nurse leaders and staff development professionals here, and visit hcmarketplace.com to place your order!

 

 

 

 

——OTHER RECENT POSTS——

⇒ 5/4: Who inspires you? There’s still time to submit your favorite quotes in posted comments, here.

⇒ 5/6: A thank you to our favorite nurses, from Boston. Here’s the post.

Nurses: What inspires you to reach for excellence?

Nurses Week is a good time to reflect on what sets the nursing profession apart from so many others. Nurses have a reverence for the work (however flawed circumstances may be on a day-to-day basis), and a commitment to bettering the “caring profession.”

This Nurses Week, please give some thought to what inspires Elizabeth Kenney2you to reach for excellence. Submit your favorite inspirational quotes and sayings in the comments box below and we will share them so all can be uplifted. We’ll also compile the best into a resource to sustain you on the days when you face challenges.

Here’s a quote from an amazing Australian nurse, Elizabeth Kenney. In the 1930’s, she pioneered the use of physical therapy, rather than immobilization, for polio victims.

 

It is better to be a lion for a day
than a sheep all your life.

             —Elizabeth Kenney, 1880-1952

 

NOTE⇒ You can use the 20% Nurses Week discount offered in this post through 5/12/2015.

Don’t Disclose: Peer review confidentiality guidelines download

confidential Recently, I posted an overview of the key confidentiality requirements for
members of the peer review committee. At long last, you can download a copy
of Don’t Disclose here, for the case review committee members in your organization.

Last week’s peer review webcast (presented by Laura Harrington and Marla Smith) was followed by a lively question and answer period. Topics ranged from the meaning of “timely” in terms of completing a review* to the virtues of including a section in your scoring that considers “contributing factors”** … and much more.

You can learn more about the on demand version of the webinar here and the presenters’ nursing peer review book here.

 

 

  * Answer: <90 days

** Answer: Be flexible. If you want to include special factors in scoring, it may help identify process issues to address proactively separate from the review

Pay equity: Who said it?

As a footnote to Rebecca’s post regarding Barton Quoteour reader poll focusing on pay equity between male and female nurses, I want
to share the following quote with you…

Without doing a Google search, can you identify the speaker? Add a comment if so…

Reminder: Nursing Peer Review Webcast

Just a few more days left until our Nursing Peer Review webcast, NPR2cloud3afeaturing nursing peer review experts Laura Harrington, RN, BSN, MHA, CPHQ, CPCQM, and Marla Smith, MHSA. These authors of the HCPro book Nursing Peer Review, Second Edition: A Practical, Nonpunitive Approach to Case Review, will pack a 90-minute webcast with answers to these questions, and more:

How do you actually do nursing case review? How do you deal
with the outcomes? And how can you use case review to monitor performance and track and trend data? And what are the core requirements for confidentiality? (See below for Don’t Disclose,
a cheat sheet of guidelines, and look for a notice soon for download instructions.)

Developing a structure to support nursing case review is just the first step. Join us on Thursday, April 16, 2015 at 1–2:30 p.m. Eastern to explore the practical requirements of implementing this important process. To register, click here.

Don't Disclose-Peer Review

 

Nursing research: Understanding whistleblowing

Last week I promised a downloadable version of the whistle imagewhistleblower flowchart. For those who are interested, you can access the file here.

When I read about the fallout on Kim Cheely, the nurse whistle-
blower I wrote about last week, I had to ask myself:
Why do nurses risk their jobs to blow the whistle? Why speak out, when there is danger of ostracism, marginalization, and damage to one’s career? I did a bit more research on the subject, and ran across a thought-provoking study published “down under” a few years ago in the Journal of Advanced Nursing. You may find it interesting also.

Using a qualitative narrative inquiry design, the Understanding whistleblowing: Qualitative insights from nurse whistleblowers study looked into the reasons nurses decided to become whistleblowers, and gathered insights into nurses’ experiences of being whistleblowers. I doubt any nurses reading this will be surprised to learn the primary reason behind the decision to blow the whistle.

It’s simple, nurses are patient advocates. Of course there’s much more to the study, and it makes interesting reading for many reasons, not the least of which is that it used face-to-face data collection methods, and based queries on real experiences and not hypothetical scenarios.

In other words, the questions didn’t ask “what would you do” if you faced with wrongdoing. The subjects of this study had worked through the tough decisions and lived through actual whistleblowing events. You can access the report on this study here.

 

The unofficial whistleblower flowchart for nurses

Last week, a whistleblower lawsuit was filed by Kim Cheely, a nurse manager at Georgia Regents Medical Center prior to being fired last October for “insubordination.” In this case, “insubordination” appears to mean that the trusted, 37-year veteran of GRMC dogged management to address quality-of-care concerns related to repeated staff reductions in the oncology and bone marrow transplant units.

The story in The Augusta Chronicle documents a situation where anything that could go wrong, did. Cheely took every logical step she could to affect change, and thought she would be protected from retaliation by invoking the hospital’s conflict resolution policy. This did not turn out well for Cheely, unfortunately. In fact, to be protected as a whistleblower, you must report to the state or national agency responsible for regulation of your employer.

For anyone considering blowing whistleblower flowchartthe whistle, take a look at the flowchart I created from advice offered on the ANA website. The chart, which illustrates just the bare bones, will be available for download later in the week, in case you want to share it with your colleagues.

On a related note: I’m currently reading draft chapters for an upcoming HCPro book, The Nurse Manager’s Legal Companion, by a wonderful nurse and attorney, Dinah Brothers. We’ll also have a handbook for staff nurses. Neither is available for preorder quite yet, but I’ll be sure to let you know when they are.

Change agent: Download your action plan for new staff

preceptor package

Yesterday I promised you a free tool adapted from
The Preceptor Program Builder, by Diana Swihart
and Solimar Figueroa.


If you’d like to download their Action Plan for New Nurses, you’ll find it here

Change is good: An action plan for new nurses

As a nurse manager, one of your challenges is to lead the change process for your staff. And, while new procedures and practices need to be assimilated by your experienced staff members as they arise, your new nurses experience the greatest number of changes every day as they transition to service from preceptorship.

Unfortunately, by and large, people are programmed not to change. New staff members may think that the skills learned in school or in a previous position will map directly to your workplace, and they will tend to fall back on the way things were done before. You, on the other hand, need them to adapt quickly, putting behaviors learned in orientation to work. In other words, you need them to change.

Try using the action plan below to help identify specific areas to address. It will give you the framework you both need to keep improving and changing.

Note: Check back tomorrow for a link to download this tool from our library of nurse manager resources. It is adapted from The Preceptor Program Builder, by Diana Swihart and Solimar Figueroa.

ActionPlan