RSSRecent Articles

Rock Your Health: 6 Daily habits you should definitely steal from history’s greatest “Creatives”

Are you exercising your “creative juices” as you move forward with your latest challenges? Did you know that being more creative makes life more fun and improves your health too!  Apparently famous creative people over history use “wellness strategies” to improve their creativity. Check it out!

Napping: Charles Darwin took a nap every day. Studies show that “sleeping on it” really does work. And while the idea of catching a few moments of rest midday may be perceived as lazy, it can actually be way better for productivity than trying to soldier through a particularly sleepy afternoon.

Wellness tip – I do something similar by taking 30 minutes to groove on my Chi Machine for relaxation. Not only do I get a great BUZZ when my Chi (energy) is flowing freely, but I often fall asleep as well!

*How often do you take time for a nap and what benefit do you receive when you do take one?

 

Being social: Lots of history’s greatest thinkers regularly visited and dined with their friends, which can help fend off the loneliness of being a creative entrepreneur.

Wellness tip – I am attracted to others with creative minds and when we are together we are “in the flow” where ideas come easily, they bounce back and forth and we have great fun. And feeling good doing what you love in the company of others like you is good for your heart and soul.

*How often do you tap into the creative juices of your naturally creative employees?

 

Exercising: Charles Darwin took 3 walks per day. Charles Dickens took “strenuous walks” through the countryside. Victor Hugo took long strenuous walks on the beach. Milton walked up and down his garden. Freud walked around Vienna at “terrific speed”.

Wellness tip – Exercise really kicks in my creative juices so I not only receive cardiac health benefits from my Jazzercise class and walking outside, but I also come up with even more ideas I can use. I often have to stop in mid-exercise to write down something brilliant I just thought of.

*What is your exercise routine and what creative thoughts occur when you are doing it?

 

Taking breaks: Giving themselves a chance to do something other than work in the middle of the day, whether it be a lunch with family or a quiet project, was popular with many of the greats. W.H. Auden did the crossword. Charles Darwin played backgammon with his wife.

Wellness tip – Breaks are hugely important for optimal health but I have to schedule them in or they don’t happen. We can work hard, but we need recovery time just like with exercise. So every 2 hours I stop and take a walk, have a cup of tea with a snack, or do a relaxation exercise.

*How often do you take breaks in your day – and make sure your employees do the same thing – to give the body/mind a chance to recover?

 

Decompressing at the end of the day: René Descartes and Charles Darwin both regularly allowed themselves time in bed at the end of every day to think about their day and come up with ideas, and, it’s safe to say, they didn’t do it with the TV on.

Wellness tip – I declare an end time every day or I will not stop working. The computer gets turned off and stays off, then off to exercise class followed by down-time eating and visiting with my husband to wind down for the day.

*What is your plan for decompressing from the day?

 

Sleep: Tchaikovsky, Hugo, Beethoven slept 8 hours each night, Dickens, Franklin, Darwin and Milton slept 7. And the majority prepared for sleep by winding down with reading, playing cards, conversation, listening to music, taking a bath.

Wellness tip – And today the old adage of sleeping 7-8 hours each night for rejuvenation still stands. I make sure the bedroom is dark, the windows are letting in fresh air and because I easily awaken to outside sounds I have a setting on my clock that creates the sounds of rain to block that out.

*What are your sleep rituals and how well are you doing with them?

 

Hopefully these “creative” ideas from past and present will be just what you need right now! And if you need a “Life Coach” who can help you sort it all out, contact me at carol@creatingwellnesscultures.com

Sample Chapter from Nursing Professional Development: A Practical Guide for Evidence-Based Education

sdms_265x265To continue our Nurses’ Week celebration, we are offering a free chapter from Nursing Professional Development: A Practical Guide for Evidence-Based Education. The chapter will help nurse educators and leaders engage with nurses of all levels of expertise, from new grads to veteran nurses.

To download the chapter, click here.

To purchase the book, visit the HCPro marketplace. Don’t forget to use the Nurses’ Week discount code NRSWK2016 for 20% off!

Continue reading for a preview of the chapter.
[more]

Free on-demand webcast!

TODAY ONLY!

To celebrate Nurses’ Week, we are giving away our most recent nursing webcast for free! For more information and to download the webcast, continue reading below.

Nursing Peer Review in Action: Experienced Nurses Share Best Practices and Lessons Learned

YN120315_MKT_WebcastJoin Sarah Moody, DNP, RN, NEA-BC, and June Marshall, DNP, RN, NEA-BC, for a free 60-minute webcast on how incident-based nursing peer review benefits an organization and elevates nurse practice.

These experienced speakers clarify the difference between formal, incident-based nursing peer review and the type of review that involves peer evaluation of nurses’ performance. They demonstrate how incident-based nursing peer review can elevate quality and the professionalism of nursing through sharing case studies and lessons learned.

Moody and Marshall have many years of experience leading nursing peer review committees as incident-based nursing peer review is mandated by the Texas Nursing Practice Act.

At the conclusion of this program, you will be able to:

  1. Compare nursing peer review and peer evaluation of performance for appraisal purposes
  2. Identify practical strategies for organizational change related to practice incidents
  3. Describe nurses’ and nurse leaders’ respective roles in incident-based peer review
  4. Clarify the differences between peer review, quality management, and disciplinary actions (human resources)

Download the full webcast here.

 

Happy Nurses’ Week!

Happy Nurses Week from HCPro. This year’s theme is “Culture of Safety: It Starts with YOU!”

nurse's weekHCPro will be celebrating by offering exciting giveaways and promotions all week long.  Check on this blog throughout the week for exclusive offers and giveaways!

We’re kicking off the celebration with a 20% discount code you can use all week toward the purchase of any of our nursing products.  Use discount code NRSWK2016 to receive your discount in the HCPro Marketplace.

You can browse our selection of nursing resources here.

Keep an eye on your email (and this space) for a chance to register to win!

CMS adopts 2012 Life Safety Code®

Editor’s Note: This originally appeared in the OSHA Healthcare Advisor.

In a highly-anticipated move expected to significantly affect the regulatory rules that hospitals and other healthcare facilities are held to, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has officially adopted the 2012 edition of the Life Safety Code® (LSC).

CMS has confirmed that the final rule adopts updated provisions of the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) 2012 edition of the LSC as well as provisions of the NFPA’s 2012 edition of the Health Care Facilities Code.

Healthcare providers affected by this rule must comply with all regulations by July 4—60 days from the publication date of the rule in the Federal Register.

The adoption of the rule has long been anticipated, as the LSC, which governs fire safety regulations in U.S. hospitals, is updated every three years, and CMS has not formally adopted a new update since 2003, when it adopted the 2000 edition. As a result, CMS surveyors have been holding healthcare facilities to different standards to other regulatory agencies that have gradually adopted provisions of the new LSC in their survey requirements.

Some of the main changes required under the final rule include:

  • Healthcare facilities located in buildings that are taller than 75 feet are required to install automatic sprinkler systems within 12 years. after the rule’s effective date.
  • Healthcare facilities are required to have a fire watch or building evacuation if their sprinkler systems is out of service for more than 10 hours.
  • The provisions offer long-term care facilities greater flexibility in what they can place in corridors. Currently, they cannot include benches or other seating areas because of fire code requirements limiting potential barriers to firefighters. Moving forward, LTC facilities will be able to include more home-like items such as fixed seating in the corridor for resting and certain decorations in patient rooms.
  • Fireplaces will be permitted in smoke compartments without a one-hour fire wall rating, which makes a facility more home-like for residents.
  • For ASCs, alcohol-based hand rub dispensers now may be placed in corridors to allow for easier access.

Visit https://s3.amazonaws.com/public-inspection.federalregister.gov/2016-10043.pdf to read the full final rule.

View the CMS press release here: https://www.cms.gov/Newsroom/MediaReleaseDatabase/Press-releases/2016-Press-releases-items/2016-05-03.html

Rock Your Health: Retirement is like an Unplanned Pregnancy

Retirement can be a surprise if you are not prepared because you didn’t pay attention to the warning signs.   Here are some “in real time” from nurses currently facing this transition. Check all of those that apply to you as well.

  • I felt like I didn’t fit in anymore
  • I was being challenged on my work performance after years of receiving accolades
  • I experienced “signs of age discrimination”
  • I asked for part-time work or less physically demanding work but was told NO
  • I was let go due to down-sizing and discovered I can’t find another job because I’m “too old”
  • My health from years of physical and emotional stress and strain prevented me from doing my job successfully
  • I reached the breaking point from job stress and knew I needed to leave
  • I was in denial about facing retirement age because I never saw me “not working”
  • I still had so much to give that I didn’t want to leave
  • I had no plan for what to do next or who I would become once I stopped working
  • Add your experience here__________________________

So what’s next for you? The best thing that happened for me was to have a Life Coach to help me straighten out all my confusion and point me in the right direction as I started to re-create myself.

Yes – you can re-create a new and improved life for yourself with all your gifts and talents, and you may even find life becomes better and better and even MORE better!

So why wait? Email me at carol@carolebert.com  and I will give you a FREE Coaching Session over the phone to inspire your next steps for moving thru this NEW transition in your life. No strings attached – just great conversation to help you set the stage for your future.

Dealing with secondary trauma for mass-casualty nurses

Many emergency nurses are used to dealing with badly injured patients and sudden death, but when it comes to caring for victims of mass shootings and their families, the healing process can be very different. Lesa Beth Titus, BSN, RN, a trauma coordinator for Mercy Medical Center that treated victims of the mass shooting in Rosburg, Oregon, told Nurse.com that nurses think they are immune to the everyday tragedies of the emergency department, but the aftereffects of a mass casualty incident were very different.

Studies show that repeated exposure to traumatic events can have a similar effect to experiencing trauma directly; this experience of trauma is referred to as secondary trauma. One study found that about one in three emergency nurses experienced anxiety, depression and sleep disorders, while one in 10 showed clinical levels of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). David Tetrault, PhD, MDiv, who worked as a chaplain at Banner-University Medical Center that treated victims from the Tucson, Arizona shooting, said that a mass shooting adds another layer of complexity, as it calls into question your personal values, which makes coping more difficult.

The public nature of mass casualties can make it more difficult for nurses suffering from secondary trauma as well. The media attention can serve as a constant reminder of the event, delaying the return to normalcy that many seek after a traumatic experience.

What can help nurses suffering from secondary trauma? It’s important to recognize that everyone reacts differently, and it’s important to respect that. Joy A. Lauerer, DNP, RN, PMHCNS-BC, explains: “We know that trauma is long-lasting and that it affects the brain and neurological systems… and some people process trauma more readily than others.” Struggles with trauma can last for years, and the trauma can be retriggered as well.

Basic self-care can have a positive effect on those dealing with trauma; eating well, proper sleep and exercise can all help the healing process. Talking with friends, family and others with similar experience can also help. As a manager, there are variety of stress management tools to help workers, and some hospitals have used protocols developed for first responders for their staff. A staff debriefing can be helpful, but it’s also important to checking in with staff regularly and provide them with voluntary ways to express themselves.

While it might be difficult to consider, having some preparation or training in place for dealing with traumatic experiences can help staff heal. As Lauerer points out, “[Emergency Departments] do a lot of disaster preparation. But I don’t think it ever prepares you for what this is going to feel like.”

To read the “The healer’s journey” article series, click here.

Want to receive articles like this one in your inbox? Subscribe to Nurse Leader Insider!

Rock Your Health: Feeling Out of Balance?

A recent study of more than 50,000 employees from a variety of manufacturing and service organizations found that two out of every five employees are dissatisfied with the balance between their work and their personal lives.  If you are feeling out of balance, what would be the best thing for you right now?

Pay attention to what is happening in your MIND, BODY and SPIRIT and begin moving from DENIAL into AWARENESS. Here is a strategy that might work for you.

  1. Make a list of signs you are experiencing in each of these areas.   Here are some examples
  • BODY – My stomach is tied up in knots and I keep taking antacids all day.
  • MIND – I’ve got too much on my mind of what I have to get done and it gives me headaches
  • SPIRIT – I’m questioning whether I can keep working at this pace the rest of my career.
  1. For each sign, re-write it from a negative point of view into a positive statement
  • BODY – I honor my body by feeding it food that makes it feel good and find I don’t need to take medication because I eat healthy
  • MIND – My mind is free of clutter because I have my priorities in order and know how to say NO
  • SPIRIT – I am at peace with where I am with my work and am looking forward to what is next in my career with renewed energy
  1. What awareness do you now have about how your life could be different?

“What is necessary to change a person is to change his (her) awareness of him (her) self.” Abraham Maslow

Email me at carol@carolebert.com if you need support with getting your life back into balance.

Editor’s Pick: Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility: Why Nurses Eat Their Young and Each Other, 2e

The American Nurses Association (ANA) has recommended the second edition of Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility: Why Nurses Eat Their Young and Each Other, by Kathleen Bartholomew, RN, MN, in its official position statement on Incivility, Bullying, and Workplace Violence as a resource for nurses. Now in its second edition, the cornerstone work has just been released as an eBook and offers 4 continuing education credits (CEU).

Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility, Second Edition

The first and most respected book showing new and experienced nurses how to build a better workplace by facing and overcoming horizontal hostility is now updated.

Find out why this book is a best-seller and how it’s empowered thousands of nurses to create positive change for themselves and their peers!

Revised to reflect current research on horizontal hostility in the nursing field (also known as lateral violence), Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility, Second Edition, provides staff nurses and their managers with techniques to create a workplace that promotes team relationships and career development while preventing burnout.

Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility provides staff nurses and their managers with the knowledge they need to:

  • Identify verbal abuse, bullying, and other detrimental behaviors
  • Develop responses to defuse or head off such behaviors
  • Create positive alternatives to hostility

These skills support the success of the individual nurse, the unit, and patient care quality at a time when healthcare systems are publicly ranked on patient experience and outcomes.

Horizontal hostility, also known as bullying or lateral violence, is a major factor in nursing attrition rates. Healthcare organizations that don’t proactively create a healthy workplace face the expense of finding, hiring, and training new nurses to replace burned-out staff.

This book provides the following benefits:

  • Skills: Nurses will learn skills for identifying and responding to verbal abuse, bullying, and other detrimental behaviors that undermine individual nurses, the unit, and the quality of patient care.
  • Real-world examples: Gain insightful reflections from individual nurses who have experienced horizontal hostility, presented in their own voices.
  • Author voice: Kathleen Bartholomew is a beloved nursing author who is authoritative yet approachable and always respectful.
  • Scholarship: Extensive references draw on the latest empirical and theoretical literature concerning horizontal hostility.
  • Culture change: Improve nurse retention, nurse productivity, and hospital rankings with an improved environment for patient care.

For more information or to order, visit the HCPro Marketplace.

Join our Nursing Book Review Group!

We would like to thank everyone who responded to our call for authors last month! The response has been fabulous and we’re still going through emails.

We are once again opening up our Nursing Book Review Group!  If you didn’t have a chance to join last year or if you’re new to us, now is your chance to join an ad-hoc group interested in reading and reviewing prepublication drafts of books and training materials in your areas of interest and expertise.

Our editors will send you periodic emails listing upcoming projects available for outside review. If you’re interested, just let us know. We’ll send reviewing guidelines and give you an idea of our timeframe. If it works for you, we’ll send the draft chapters as they’re available, and a printed copy of the book when it’s complete. In addition, you will be recognized as a reviewer inside the printed book.

Please have a minimum of five years of nursing experience and be in an educational, supervisory, or leadership role within your organization.

For more information or to sign up as a reviewer, please fill out our reviewer form.