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Happy Nurses Week!

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HCPro Spring Sale!

We’re celebrating spring with a #spring sale! Add to your nursing library and save 35% off your book purchase through the end of March.

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Rock Your Health: How to get what you want every time you ask

I know – that doesn’t sound possible. But how would you like to raise your odds of success?

Have you ever wanted something to happen to improve your life and it just wasn’t happening? No matter how hard you tried? Maybe you were trying too hard and need to slack off a bit. Sometimes we block our desires by pushing too hard and then get frustrated thinking “Why aren’t I getting anywhere? I’m working as hard as I can and getting nowhere.”

Here’s an example. I was teaching a class for teachers on how to bring positivity into the classroom using the Law of Attraction and suddenly realized that as much as I know about all the ways in the world to attract great things to my life, I still don’t always practice them. This class became a reminder of that, so I’d like to share with you five tips to help you do less, feel better and attract more.

Here are some tips to get you started.

  • First decide what desire you want to manifest for yourself
  • Create a Vision Board that represents what your desire looks like and display it where you see it every day
  • Schedule time every day to focus on your desire in a relaxed state
  • Practice techniques you enjoy daily that relax you like meditation, yoga, Tai Chi, exercise, listening to relaxing music, etc.
  • Keep a journal of all the things you start manifesting as proof that it works

Now you will be on your way to getting what you want (almost) every time you ask. I would love to hear your comments about this.

Join our Nursing Book Review Group!

We would like to thank everyone who responded to our call for authors last month! The response has been fabulous and we’re still going through emails.

We are once again opening up our Nursing Book Review Group!  If you didn’t have a chance to join last year or if you’re new to us, now is your chance to join an ad-hoc group interested in reading and reviewing prepublication drafts of books and training materials in your areas of interest and expertise.

Our editors will send you periodic emails listing upcoming projects available for outside review. If you’re interested, just let us know. We’ll send reviewing guidelines and give you an idea of our timeframe. If it works for you, we’ll send the draft chapters as they’re available, and a printed copy of the book when it’s complete. In addition, you will be recognized as a reviewer inside the printed book.

Please have a minimum of five years of nursing experience and be in an educational, supervisory, or leadership role within your organization.

For more information or to sign up as a reviewer, please fill out our reviewer form.

Become an HCPro Author

Last summer, we asked you to join our Nursing Book Review Group and the response was overwhelming. We are thrilled with how many of you were eager to share your thoughts and ideas for a variety of our nursing products.

We are looking for enthusiastic nurse managers, nurse leaders, and nurse educators who are willing to become authors and share their experiences, success stories, and lessons learned with fellow colleagues.

We’re currently looking for authors for an upcoming critical thinking text as well as an upcoming nursing program orientation text. If this is something you’re interested in, please email me at mclarke@hcpro.com. You don’t have to be an experienced author, we’ll provide you with the tools and guidance needed.

If you have an idea for a different book than the topics already mentioned, please email us. We’re always looking for new topics that will help you do your jobs better.

Note: If you didn’t have a chance to join our Nursing Book Review Group last year, keep an eye on this spot for an upcoming announcement about the group.

We look forward to hearing from you!

Take Five: How renewal rooms revive stressed out nurses

With long shifts, hard work, and close contact with the sick and the dying, it’s unsurprising that many nurses are burnt out. One study found that nearly one-third of oncology nurses exhibit emotional exhaustion and 50% report levels of emotional distress. Despite the fact they might be hurting, nurses are often expected to “tough it out,” hiding their stress from the eyes of others.

Compassion fatigue is a huge issue for us all in bedside nursing, and we as leaders need to look into and address that,” says Jacklynn Lesniak, RN, MS, BSN, senior vice president of patient care services and chief nursing officer at Cancer Treatment Centers of America (CTCA) at Midwestern Regional Medical Center in Zion, IL.

In response, CTCA Midwestern created several “nurse renewal rooms,” with one in each inpatient tower, surgical department, and outpatient care area. The rooms were designed by Jillianne Shriver, RN, BSN, HN-BC who studied relaxation techniques and holistic nursing for three months for the project.

Only one nurse is allowed in the room at a time, giving them much needed private time away from the eyes of patients and coworkers. Each room is laden with relaxation material and décor: aromatherapy and meditation material, a yoga mat, a sand garden, books for reading and journaling, and music therapy.  When a nurse feels he or she needs to step back, they inform their charge nurse that they need to use the room. Then they hand over their communications devices and go into the renewal room for a couple minutes to decompress.

“I decided that I really wanted somewhere for the nurses to take that time to renew, rejuvenate, and recharge,” Shriver says. “To step out of whatever situation they may be in, whether that be a stressful or busy day, and have five to 15 minutes to themselves to be able to focus, ground themselves, take a deep breath, and then step back into practice.”

Not only did the renewal rooms work, they worked well. CTCA Midwestern reported that the first renewal room was used 422 times in the first three months and 96% of nurses said they felt better after using it. Which is pretty impressive when you consider the first renewal room was just a supply area with a massage chair and some relaxing decorations.

To read more in-depth about nurse renewal rooms, check out the original article at HealthLeaders.com.

What to get your nurses this year

The holidays are well and truly upon us, which means across the world people are panicking as they realize they haven’t bought any presents yet.

The holidays are a busy time of year for healthcare professionals, with nurses trying to balance an increased workload with holiday obligations. A few simple gifts can do wonders for morale and show nurses that they are appreciated for their work.

And if you miss the holiday deadline? Hand out presents on New Year’s. It’s a federally recognized holiday and gives you more time to buy.

  1. Keep Calm I’m a Nurse T-shirt

So nurses can go off the clock and still let the world know who’s boss. You can buy them on an individual basis or buy them in bulk for your staff.

  1. Coffee

Give the gift of caffeine. Either gift cards to Starbucks or (if you have $100 to spare) a Keurig brewing system for the nurses’ lounge.

  1. Scrubs Season One

Good for some laughs and to remind everyone that you work in a much less dysfunctional hospital. Or that you do, but at least your janitors aren’t actively conspiring against you.

  1. Chicken Soup for the Nurses Soul by Jack Canfield

Stories from the frontlines of nursing. Some are funny, some are uplifting, and some are moving. A good read for both new and veteran nurses.

  1. “Do not disturb: Nurse sleeping” sign

Need I say more?

  1. Things that they would like

This is your chance to show your nurses that you really know them. A running joke in the hospital, fixing something that’s been broken a long time, or something particular to your area. Be creative! And always leave the receipt in the wrapper.

Temp is not the same as terrible: Study finds supplemental nurses have no negative effect on quality

What do you do when you don’t have enough nurses on staff and don’t have the funds to hire additional staff? A possible solution is to hire temporary nurses to fill the gaps made by retiring staff, seasonal needs, or new medical programs.

The Department of Health and Human Services found that there are 88,495 temporary nurses working in the U.S., making up 3.4% of the total nursing population. Most temporary nurses are experienced travel nurses who work with a hospital on three- to six-month contracts before moving on.

Yet many nurse managers are leery of using temp nurses because of a longstanding stigma associating such nurses with lower quality care. This belief has been reinforced by media exposés on shoddy temp agencies skimping on background checks and allowing temps to jump from hospital to hospital to avoid misconduct charges. [more]

Air seal of ORs compromised by high foot traffic

Johns Hopkins Medicine has released a study showing that OR doors are opened an average of every 2.5 minutes during surgeries, according to a study of 100 knee arthroplasties and 91 hip arthroplasties. The study found that for every 1.5 hours of surgery, doors were held open for an average of 9.6 minutes [9% of the total cut-to-close time.]

Most ORs are slightly pressurized so that air will flow out into the hospital corridor instead of the operating room, which limits the risk of airborne germs entering the OR and causing infections. The Johns Hopkins study, however, shows that in 40% of the reviewed cases, doors were open long enough to depressurize the OR. [more]