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Change agent: Download your action plan for new staff

preceptor package

Yesterday I promised you a free tool adapted from
The Preceptor Program Builder, by Diana Swihart
and Solimar Figueroa.


If you’d like to download their Action Plan for New Nurses, you’ll find it here

Nurses: Say This, Not That

Power can be taken, but not given. The process of the taking is empowerment in itself.
—Gloria Steinem

In a recent post, I promised a free tool adapted from The Image of Nursing.
If you’d like to download SAY THIS, NOT THAT: An Empowerment Glossary for
Nurses,
you’ll find it here. And while you’re waiting for the download, try this: 

If you hear yourself saying:

No one notices my contributions  

Say this instead:

I’d like to share with you how I’ve handled this situation

 

Injured Nurses: Who has your back?

In 2013 your nursing staff faced a
15% greater chance of spine injury
than firefighters.

Check out the Bureau of Labor Statistics Table 18 for the spine injury picfinal tabulated 2013 rates of musculoskeletal injuries for FT workers, compared by occupation. Firefighters—who lug heavy ladders, people, and equipment daily—had a rate of 232 per 10,000. For nursing staff, the total was 264 per 10,000 full-time RNs and nursing assistants. A spine injury can end a career in the blink of an eye. But how can these injuries be prevented?

Your mother’s admonition to “bend your knees” while lifting something heavy may not be enough to protect the backs of your nursing staff. In an ongoing article series entitled Injured Nurses, NPR takes a look at what can happen when nurses depend solely on proper body mechanics (essentially, keeping your back straight while following mom’s advice) for moving patients. As of this writing, you’ll find three installments on NPR.org that explore the problem, possible solutions, and how some hospitals may or may not “have your back.”

On a positive note, the Baptist Health System reports that the Transfer and Lift with Care program it introduced in 2007 has reduced patient-handling injuries in their organization by 81%. One important factor in their success? Investing in assistive equipment and devices in each of its five hospitals.

If I can get specific statistics and practices from Baptist, I’ll post them here for you to share with your peers and hospital administrators. I’ll also post a link to a PDF of Table 18, which should be a little easier on the eyes than the official version.

In the meanwhile, if you’d like to share ways your organization has your back, feel free to comment below.


 

UPDATE> 4/4/2015. Here’s a highlighted section of Table 18, with the RN/nursing assistant and firefighter statistics highlighted.table excerpt

Ben Franklin’s advice to nurse preceptors

Tell me and I forget.
Teach me and I remember.
Involve me and I learn.

How do you provide preceptees with constructive advice Ben Franklin2
or feedback? Do you tell them what they did wrong and spell out how to correct it? Or do you encourage them to use critical-thinking skills to truly ingrain a personal understanding of ways to improve their practice?

Look at these two approaches to feedback, and see which you think would be more effective. (More examples excerpted from The Preceptor Program Builder can be found in the Reading Room.)

The preceptor observes the preceptee greeting the manager correctly, giving her name, and stating that she is a preceptee. However, she was not wearing her name tag.

Evaluative feedback
Your name tag is missing, and the manager
won’t like it!

Descriptive feedback
You greeted the manager according to the facility protocol.
Can you think of anything that would help your manager remember you?

The descriptive feedback encourages the preceptee to use critical thinking, which illustrates Ben Franklin’s timeless recommendation to “involve me, and I learn.”

If you would like to share “aha” moments and techniques for constructive feedback, please feel free to comment below…

Webcast: Build Nurse Engagement Through Coaching and Mentoring

Studies show only 30% of your nurses are actively engaged, which can negatively impact patient satisfaction, safety, and nurse turnover. Join us on February 26 at 1 p.m. to discover how to engage the rest of your staff.

Join experienced nurse and leadership specialist Patty Kubus, RN, MBA, PhD, for a 90-minute webcast to learn how to build a culture of nurse engagement.

Don’t miss the chance to improve nurse satisfaction, increase your nursing staff’s commitment to the organization, and raise the level of patient care.

Research shows a culture of nurse engagement leads to:

  • Higher productivity
  • Higher patient satisfaction scores
  • Lower turnover
  • Lower absenteeism
  • Fewer safety incidences

For more information or to sign up, visit http://hcmarketplace.com/build-nurse-engagement-through-coaching-and-mentoring?code=EW322354&utm_source=HCPro&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=YN022615.

Meet the speaker:
Patty Kubus, RN, MBA, PhD, is the president of Leadership Potential International, Inc., which helps executives select and develop their leaders to improve engagement and productivity in their organizations. She has worked with Fortune 100 companies in the healthcare, financial, aerospace manufacturing, and pharmaceutical industries. Along with her nursing credentials, she has an MBA and a doctorate in human development and education. She was formerly a nurse manager at the University of Rochester Medical Center in New York.

 

Live webcast: Build Nurse Engagement Through Coaching and Mentoring

Studies show only 30% of your nurses are actively engaged, which can negatively impact patient satisfaction, safety, and nurse turnover. Join us on May 28 at 1 p.m. to discover how to engage the rest of your staff.

Join experienced nurse and leadership specialist Patty Kubus, RN, MBA, PhD, for a 90-minute webcast to learn how to build a culture of nurse engagement.

Don’t miss the chance to improve nurse satisfaction, increase your nursing staff’s commitment to the organization, and raise the level of patient care.

This webcast will discuss how to build a culture of nurse engagement, which leads to the following benefits:

  • Higher productivity
  • Higher patient satisfaction scores
  • Lower turnover
  • Lower absenteeism
  • Fewer safety incidences

For more information, or to register, visit http://hcmarketplace.com/build-nurse-engagement-through-coaching-and-mentoring.

Nurses Week giveaway of preceptor and preceptee handbooks

HCPro is celebrating and recognizing nurses all week long with special giveaways, prizes, and promotions.

We are giving away FREE copies of The Effective Preceptor Handbook for Nurses and The Essential Preceptee Handbook!

Transform your preceptor/preceptee program with these cutting-edge resources. Enter to win five copies of each handbook!

The Effective Preceptor Handbook for Nurses provides new preceptors with the evidence-based skills they need to build supportive one-on-one teaching and learning relationships with new nurses.

The Essential Preceptee Handbook provides new staff members with the guidance they need to build supportive relationships with their preceptors and acclimate to the work environment and culture.

Click here to enter to win!

HCPro prepares to celebrate Nurses Week

As preparations ramp up for this year’s Nurses Week, it’s not too late to purchase gifts for your nurses! Consider showing your appreciation for your nurses by giving them some cutting-edge resources devoted to professional development.

The Preceptor Program Builder

The Preceptor Program Builder provides professional development staff the keys to creating successful preceptor programs in the healthcare environment.

The book provides a core design for developing preceptors that can be applied to any program and discipline where preceptors orient or transition new employees, students, or persons transitioning into a new role or position. This work invites all groups, disciplines, and professions to create a framework built on practical tools, definitions, principles, and concepts for training preceptors and building formal preceptorships.

Click here for more information.

Effective Preceptor Handbook for Nurses (10 Pack)

The Effective Preceptor Handbook for Nurses provides new preceptors with the evidence-based skills they need to build supportive one-on-one teaching and learning relationships with new nurses.

Nurse preceptors in training will learn how to access adult learning styles, validate competencies, develop critical feedback and evaluation skills, and gain confidence to successfully onboard and launch their preceptees. Preceptors will also be introduced to the idea of portfolio-building as a way to prepare for certification.

Click here for more information.

The Essential Preceptee Handbook (10 Pack)

The Essential Preceptee Handbook provides new members of staff with the guidance and support they need to build supportive one-on-one relationships with their preceptors and helps them acclimate to the work environment and culture.

In this invaluable and compact handbook, preceptees will evaluate how they learn and how to improve critical thinking, gain confidence in receiving and giving feedback, and develop the skills they need to successfully transition to service. This handbook is an essential part of any onboarding experience for new employees.

Click here for more information.

Discounts are available for bulk purchases. Contact customer service at 800-650-6787 for more information.

Are you ready for National Nurses Week?

It is almost time to begin the celebrations for National Nurses Week, whose theme this year is “Nurses: Leading the Way.”

Each day during National Nurses Week, HCPro will be celebrating by offering exciting giveaways and special promotions. Keep an eye on your email for a chance to register to win!

Many managers and healthcare organizations enjoy rewarding nurses at this special time with a gift that treats, celebrates, or encourages their nursing staff. This year, consider the gift of professional development with a book from HCPro. Thank your staff with one of these nursing resources.

Provide professional support for nurses on the go

Quick-E Pro: Time Management: A Guide For Nurses by Debbie Buchwach, BSN, RN-BC

Give your staff the gift of less stress for National Nurses Week with these handy guides that are filled with real-world advice and designed to help nurses better manage their time, avoid burnout, and improve their work-life balance. Provide the coaching they need to develop and succeed with Quick-E! Pro Time Management: A Guide for Nurses. Click here for more information.

You might also be interested in:

Quick-E! Pro Scripting: A Guide for Nurses, which helps nurses communicate clearly and confidently with patients, physicians, and peers.

Quick-E! Pro: Evidence-Based Practice: A Guide for Nurses, which walks nurses through how to find evidence and critique literature and therefore make evidence-based practice a top priority for themselves and your organization.

Organizations aim to promote quality of care

Promoting quality of care is a major goal for organizations in 2013, according to a recent poll on StrategiesforNurseManagers.com; promoting quality of care received 43% of responses. In second place was improving nurse retention, with 29%, followed by encouraging staff-led initiatives (17%) and increasing staffing (11%). The poll is still active, so if you haven’t already, head over to StrategiesforNurseManagers.com to participate!

What goals has your organization set for 2013? What progress have you made on those goals since the start of the year? Share your thoughts in the comments section.