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AAPA Preceptor Conference

AAPA city

2017 Preceptor Conference

April 27-28, 2017 | Miami, Florida

Pre-conference: April 26, 2017

The 2017 Preceptor Conference features two days of education and training taught by the industry’s leading preceptor experts. During the event, attendees will learn actionable strategies for building preceptor programs in their healthcare facility and learning how to advance preceptor specialty practice among their experienced preceptors. Arrive a day early and participate in a preceptor training program designed specifically for faculty and clinical instructors.

The 2017 Preceptor Conference is designed for preceptors, nurses, nurse leaders, advanced practice providers, educators, professional and staff development specialists, and students. Network with leaders and preceptors to explore meaningful recognition and specialty certification through nationally accepted standards of practice and performance inherent in preceptor specialty practice. Learn how to positively meet the many complexities and challenges preceptors encounter within academia, clinical settings, and the workplace.

Topics:

  • Advancement of Preceptor Specialists
  • Scope and standards of preceptor specialty practice
  • Preceptor Specialist portfolio building
  • Review preceptor-based scenarios and discussions with simulation educators in the Preceptor Simulation Lab

Who should attend?

  • Nurses
  • Preceptors
  • Certified Preceptor Specialists
  • Advanced Practice Providers
  • Nurse Leaders
  • Educators
  • Professional and Staff Development Specialists
  • Nursing and Healthcare Students

For more information, visit www.preceptoracademy.com.

What to know about new nurses: Motivating millennials

Last year, millennials passed Gen Xers in workforce numbers, and now make up the majority of the workers in the  U.S. according to the Pew Research Center. Another study shows that two out of three millennial workers hope to have a different job in five years, and that one in four said they might leave their job to pursue a different career. Nursing is not immune to this trend, so it’s more important than ever to keep your young staff motivated and engaged to prevent short-staffing. Below are some tips for engaging your millennial staff!

Show trust: Millennial workers tend to have an independent streak and want to find their own way; by showing your staff that you trust them to make decisions will bolster their confidence and engage their creativity. If you micromanage young workers, their more likely to pull away from your group and look elsewhere for career advancements.

Provide support and access:  Showing trust does not mean leaving them alone. Millennial workers want to hear feedback from their superiors, and providing frequent in-person contact is very important for their job satisfaction. Make sure you’re willing to listen to them and provide support whenever possible.

Emphasize relationships: Similarly, millennial workers have a strong sense of commitment to others and seek to establish meaningful connections with their coworkers.  Try to cultivate a close-knit staff by encouraging social outings and holding staff events; the unit will work better as a team and young staff will feel more connected to their job.

Talk about the future: Millennial workers are not likely to wait around for career advancements. If you can outline a career trajectory in your facility and help them get there, your young staff will be much happier in their position. Try to keep bureaucratic road blocks to a minimum, and you could have a future nurse leader for your hospital.

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Ask the expert: Switching nurse specialties

Changing specialties has become an integral part of a nurse’s career growth. We spoke with Elaine Foster, Ph.D., MSN, RN, Associate Dean, Nursing Graduate Programs at American Sentinel University about this trend and what nurses should consider when making a change.

“Nurses have a powerful thirst for knowledge and a stron­g desire to learn and grow, and this often translates into motivation to make a career change. Many will reach a time when they would like to experience different professional opportunities,” says Foster. “In the nursing world, we need to actually help people plan out their career strategies, and it would help new nurses if they received more guidance; we don’t spend a lot of time painting the overall picture of healthcare.”

So where should a nurse considering a career change start? Foster advises that a nurse should start by researching their areas of interest and finding a specialty that fits them. “Read articles, talk to nurses in that field, assess the job market in your area, and learn everything you can about the specialty you are interested in.”

Another important factor to consider is education: does the specialty require more education or certification? Foster notes that in the past, it was more common for nurses to receive on-the-job training and end up in management positions without formal training, but in recent years, nurses require formal education and credentials to advance their careers.

After conducting your research, Foster suggests talking to people currently working in the field. Networking is crucial to making a career shift, and making a connection with an experienced nurse in your field provides plenty of benefits. Shadowing a nurse in your field gives you first-hand experience with the day-to-day demands of the position, and if you do end up pursuing the new specialty, your contact could provide job leads or even become a preceptor in the future.

Finally, before you make a career change, Foster advises that you reflect on the benefits and consider the costs. “Think about how this change will impact you in the future and what you might have to give up now to get that future five years down the road,” she says. “It took ten years to get my PhD; I had to give up a few things, but I’m grateful that I did.”

For more career-shift strategies, check out American Sentinel University’s guide.

FREE White Paper: Preceptor competencies

Enjoy a FREE white paper on preceptor competency assessment and verification!

This white paper is compiled from the third edition of the groundbreaking book, downloadicon3
The Preceptor Program Builder
,
written by Diana Swihart, PhD, DMin, MSN, APN CS, RN-BC, and Solimar Figueroa, MHA, MSN, BSN, RN. It discusses and defines the competencies developed in preceptorships, explores the goals and essential elements of competency assessment and verification, and takes a close look at the categories of competencies and methods for assessing and verifying them within the context of the preceptor relationship.

Click here to download the white paper: Preceptor competency assessment and verification.


The Preceptor Program Builder provides professional development staff the keys to creating a successful preceptor program in the healthcare environment. Learn more here.

Click here to view our full range of nursing resources.

Nurses Week: Your 20% sneak peek savings

HCPro is celebrating and recognizing nurses all week long with special giveaways, prizes, and promotions, but we don’t want to wait until Wednesday to start the celebration!

Starting today, you can use our special Nurses Week 2015 catalog coverdiscount code to save on any and all nursing books, videos, and webinars… Just use discount code NRSWK2015 at checkout to receive 20% off your selections.

Download and browse our 2015 catalogue of resources for nurse leaders and staff development professionals here, and visit hcmarketplace.com to place your order!

 

 

 

 

——OTHER RECENT POSTS——

⇒ 5/4: Who inspires you? There’s still time to submit your favorite quotes in posted comments, here.

⇒ 5/6: A thank you to our favorite nurses, from Boston. Here’s the post.

Change is good: An action plan for new nurses

As a nurse manager, one of your challenges is to lead the change process for your staff. And, while new procedures and practices need to be assimilated by your experienced staff members as they arise, your new nurses experience the greatest number of changes every day as they transition to service from preceptorship.

Unfortunately, by and large, people are programmed not to change. New staff members may think that the skills learned in school or in a previous position will map directly to your workplace, and they will tend to fall back on the way things were done before. You, on the other hand, need them to adapt quickly, putting behaviors learned in orientation to work. In other words, you need them to change.

Try using the action plan below to help identify specific areas to address. It will give you the framework you both need to keep improving and changing.

Note: Check back tomorrow for a link to download this tool from our library of nurse manager resources. It is adapted from The Preceptor Program Builder, by Diana Swihart and Solimar Figueroa.

ActionPlan

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Improving the image of nursing

Every nurse can play a part in elevating the public perception of the nursing profession. The table below shows you how email, evidence-based research, reasonable work schedules, a diverse workforce, preceptorships, interprofessional communication skills, and name tags can promote the professional image of nursing. This table was adapted from the HCPro book, The Image of Nursing, by Shelley Cohen, RN, MS, CEN and Kathleen Bartholomew, RN, MN.

 imageof nursing table 2

Ben Franklin’s advice to nurse preceptors

Tell me and I forget.
Teach me and I remember.
Involve me and I learn.

How do you provide preceptees with constructive advice Ben Franklin2
or feedback? Do you tell them what they did wrong and spell out how to correct it? Or do you encourage them to use critical-thinking skills to truly ingrain a personal understanding of ways to improve their practice?

Look at these two approaches to feedback, and see which you think would be more effective. (More examples excerpted from The Preceptor Program Builder can be found in the Reading Room.)

The preceptor observes the preceptee greeting the manager correctly, giving her name, and stating that she is a preceptee. However, she was not wearing her name tag.

Evaluative feedback
Your name tag is missing, and the manager
won’t like it!

Descriptive feedback
You greeted the manager according to the facility protocol.
Can you think of anything that would help your manager remember you?

The descriptive feedback encourages the preceptee to use critical thinking, which illustrates Ben Franklin’s timeless recommendation to “involve me, and I learn.”

If you would like to share “aha” moments and techniques for constructive feedback, please feel free to comment below…

Aetna’s Preceptor Program: The Proof Is in the Program

Do preceptors and preceptees benefit by moving from an
ad-hoc preceptoring program to a formal one?

Lorri Freifeld, editor-in-chief at Training: The Source for Professional Development, recently reported some exciting findings from a formal nurse preceptor program initiated by Aetna, Inc.

Following a 6-month pilot, Aetna launched a formal nurse preceptor program in January 2013. At its outset, the formal program provided 65% of new hires with preceptors, incorporated beefed-up workshop offerings, instituted weekly progress reports between preceptors and their supervisors, increased communication of best practices, created a community calendar of training events, and implemented on-demand training and follow-up with recently preceptored new hires.

The result after three months?

  • 53% of new hires were managing a full caseload
  • 100% of preceptors said soft skills training was sufficient (up from 0%!)
  • 97% of preceptors felt the tools and resources were effective
  • 67% of new hires reported having adequate time with their preceptors

And after six months?

  • Turnover was down 50%
  • 100% of new hires had a preceptor
  • 150 new preceptor volunteers had joined the program

Pretty impressive and immediate results from a new program. Kudos to Aetna for committing to a professional approach in this most important phase of a new hire’s experience.


To read the full article, click here.

To see related HCPro offerings, including The Preceptor Program Builder, click here.