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Nurse educator takes to Instagram to help new nurses

Many new nurses have trouble acclimating to their new roles, but one nurse has found new and exciting ways to help them adjust.

Jannel D. Gooden, BSN, RN struggled with her first job in nursing; the first six months were traumatic, confusing, and isolating. After leaving her position, she decided to focus on guiding other novice nurses through the difficult process.

In addition to being a travel nurse in pediatric critical care, Gooden started an Instagram account to teach novice nurses and provide them with a sense of community. Gooden makes videos on the @NoviceisTheNewNurse account, sharing advice, recalling her own experiences as a novice nurse, and answering questions from new nurses.

Some of Gooden’s videos include perspectives from physicians as well. She argues that nurses of all specialties work with physicians every shift, and it is vital that nurses learn to communicate with physicians effectively and develop healthy working relationships. By sharing physician perspectives, Gooden hopes to soften their image for novice nurses, giving them a safe space to hear advice out of the workplace.

To read more about @NoviceisTheNewNurse, access the full story here.

New strategies for the nursing shortage

Hospitals are offering new incentives to get staff involved with recruitment.

We’ve all heard it by now: the nurse shortage is here, and it’s only going to get worse. Between population growth, retirement, and life expectancy increase, reports estimate a three million RN shortage by 2020.

Faced with these challenges, University of Missouri (MU) Health Care has asked its staff for help in recruiting nurses to their facilities. Instead of offering bonuses and incentives to new hires, MU Health is offering staff members $10,000 for recruiting qualified candidates to its Intensive Care Units (ICU). MU Health hopes to convey respect and value for their employees, improving retention while making the facility more attractive to new applicants. The recruiters also say that sign-on bonuses could lead to job-hopping, rather than encouraging nurses to stay at a facility.

One of the other factors affecting the shortage is a bottleneck around training people to become nurses. The retirement issue applies to nursing school professors as well, and schools are constrained by professor to student ratios in determining how many applicants are accepted.

MU Health Care also hopes to address this issue by helping its staff become educators. They have instituted a residency program that allows trained nurses to collaborate with nursing students at their hospitals. The hospitals provide exposure to nursing students, and they hope to encourage students to stay within their community once they graduate. The Missouri Hospital Association is sponsoring a clinical leadership academy, which will train bedside nurses to become clinical instructors.

In addition to its own programs, MU Health Care encourages employees to go back to school to advance their careers, offering tuition reimbursement for staff members. These creative incentives for employees serve the dual function of retaining current staff while making the facility more attractive to new recruits.

Featured Webcast: Millennial Nurse Retention: Bridging the Generation Gap

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

In 2015, the number of millennials in the workplace surpassed baby boomers as the largest segment of workers. This future generation of nurses has very different career expectations than the generations before them. Millennials expect more feedback, greater collaboration, interaction with nurse leaders, an 8-hour workday and better work-life balance. Unlike their parents, they rarely intend to stay with one employer for their entire career—or possibly even more than a few years.

The shift in attitude has many organizations struggling to retain millennials and learning to adjust management strategies to accommodate their unique style. Join Kathy Bonser, Vice President of Nursing and CNO at SSM Health DePaul as she discusses the importance of leveraging the differences to create a win-win environment for staff and frontline leaders.

Take part in this live 60-minute webcast to:

  • Uncover how making changes in leadership behaviors can bridge the generation gap
  • Discover new onboarding processes that support the growing millennial workforce
  • Devise a structured approach to providing regular employee feedback
  • Understand the importance and value of engaging millennials early and often

Agenda:

  • Improving nurse retention, especially in the first year after hire
  • Understand communication preferences
    • Text or call? How to decide
    • Use of social media
  • The importance of strong onboarding and engagement processes
    • Scheduled touchpoints
    • Celebration of milestones
    • The need for performance feedback
  • The need for transparency
    • Explaining the why behind decisions
    • Seeking out nurse feedback and acting on it
    • Shedding light on how their contributions make a difference
  • Live Q&A

HCPro is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation. HCPro provides 1.0 nursing contact hours for this educational activity.

For more information or to register for the webcast, click here.

What to know about new nurses: Motivating millennials

Last year, millennials passed Gen Xers in workforce numbers, and now make up the majority of the workers in the  U.S. according to the Pew Research Center. Another study shows that two out of three millennial workers hope to have a different job in five years, and that one in four said they might leave their job to pursue a different career. Nursing is not immune to this trend, so it’s more important than ever to keep your young staff motivated and engaged to prevent short-staffing. Below are some tips for engaging your millennial staff!

Show trust: Millennial workers tend to have an independent streak and want to find their own way; by showing your staff that you trust them to make decisions will bolster their confidence and engage their creativity. If you micromanage young workers, their more likely to pull away from your group and look elsewhere for career advancements.

Provide support and access:  Showing trust does not mean leaving them alone. Millennial workers want to hear feedback from their superiors, and providing frequent in-person contact is very important for their job satisfaction. Make sure you’re willing to listen to them and provide support whenever possible.

Emphasize relationships: Similarly, millennial workers have a strong sense of commitment to others and seek to establish meaningful connections with their coworkers.  Try to cultivate a close-knit staff by encouraging social outings and holding staff events; the unit will work better as a team and young staff will feel more connected to their job.

Talk about the future: Millennial workers are not likely to wait around for career advancements. If you can outline a career trajectory in your facility and help them get there, your young staff will be much happier in their position. Try to keep bureaucratic road blocks to a minimum, and you could have a future nurse leader for your hospital.

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Featured Webcast: Millennial Nurse Retention

Millennial Nurse Retention: Bridging the Generation Gap

In 2015, the number of millennials in the workplace surpassed baby boomers as the largest segment of workers. This future generation of nurses has very different career expectations than the generations before them. Millennials expect more feedback, greater collaboration, interaction with nurse leaders, an 8-hour workday and better work-life balance. Unlike their parents, they rarely intend to stay with one employer for their entire career—or possibly even more than a few years.

The shift in attitude has many organizations struggling to retain millennials and learning to adjust management strategies to accommodate their unique style. Join Kathy Bonser, Vice President of Nursing and CNO at SSM Health DePaul as she discusses the importance of leveraging the differences to create a win-win environment for staff and frontline leaders.

Take part in this live 60-minute webcast to:

  • Uncover how making changes in leadership behaviors can bridge the generation gap
  • Discover new onboarding processes that support the growing millennial workforce
  • Devise a structured approach to providing regular employee feedback
  • Understand the importance and value of engaging millennials early and often

For more details or to register for the webcast, please visit The Health Leaders Media store.

What to know about New Nurses: Tips for getting and keeping RNs in a rural hospital

The nursing shortage is becoming a major issue again and rural hospitals are being hit hardest. Nurses tend to stay local when possible, so rural hospitals can have a hard time attracting new nurses to move to their area without the benefits and salary of urban hospitals. Below are some suggestions on how to improve your odds of attracting (and keeping) star graduates at your rural hospital.

Moving to a rural hospital can be intimidating for a new nurse, working in relative isolation without the support system of a larger hospital. Provide mentorship and regular training programs to help ease the transition and boost the young nurse’s confidence. Schedule shifts alongside experienced RNs whenever possible to give them a sense of security.

Being a smaller hospital has some benefits as well. Emphasize the intimacy of a small hospital community and offer manageable patient-loads.

Provide leadership opportunities and a clear path for advancement. Residency programs, teaching opportunities, community wellness programs, and tuition reimbursement can be a huge draw for ambitious young nurses.

Developing a strong staff that provides outstanding care will make your hospital even more attractive to new nurses, hopefully leading to a consistent cycle of new talent into your rural facility.

For an in-depth report on the challenges facing rural nursing, check out: Healthcare in the outlands.

What to know about new nurses: Tackling Turnover

Hiring a competent nurse staff is only half the battle. The other half is keeping them. A new study published in Nursing Ethics found the turnover rates for RNs is 16.5%, with each resignation costing a hospital between $44,380 to $63,400 a nurse. Furthermore, newly licensed nurses scored lower on job satisfaction and were more likely to leave their job within two years.

The Nursing Ethics report found that intergenerational conflict was a big part of nurse dissatisfaction; with millennials, Gen Xers, and baby boomers butting heads at the hospital.

“Younger generation nurses feel like they don’t have power over their practice, they’re not in charge, and that is logical because they are novice practitioners,” study author Charleen McNeill said in a press release. “However, they bring a knowledge of technology that seasoned nurses may lack. In turn, more experienced nurses support the clinical learning and professional role formation of new nurses. Successful nurse-leaders find ways to garner the strengths of each generation of nurses to achieve the best patient outcomes.”

McNeill said instead of looking at it as conflict, nurse-leaders need to leverage the strengths of each generation and determine strategies to empower all generations of nurses. Their research suggested a strong correlation between professional values and career development. They also found that both job satisfaction and career development correlated positively with nurse retention.

“The work culture that leaders create – the environment that nurses are working in – is the most important thing related to retention,” McNeill said. “It’s very expensive to hire new nurses. When we have good nurses, we want to keep them so we need to understand what’s important to keep them.”

For more tips on retention, conflict resolution and recruitment, check out the following articles from our Strategies for Nurse Managers site!

What to know about New Nurses: Stuck in Place

The healthcare industry is facing a shortage of nurses as members of the baby boomer generation retire and the industry expands. The upcoming decades are going to be reliant on new nurses to fill the gaps left by their predecessors. As a manager, what do you know about the people that will make up your staff in upcoming years?

Take a map of the U.S. and point to any town with a population of 100 or more. Odds are that within 30 miles of town center you’ll find a post office, a police station, a bar, and a hospital.

Hospitals and healthcare centers are key facilities and can be found pretty much everywhere. Coupled with a growing healthcare industry and more people getting nursing degrees, you would expect that after getting their license most new nurses would flock to big cities and big states for more job opportunities.

A study done by the RN Work Project found that this wasn’t quite the case. Instead, 88% of new nurses find their first job in the same state they attended high school. In fact, 66% of nurses currently work within 100 miles of their high school, with 35% working less than 15 miles away!

There are several factors that a new nurse needs to consider when thinking about moving. There’s economic factors such as the cost of living and average nursing salary in a given state. It may be more feasible for a new nurse to live with their parents and keep their expenses low while they pay off student debt. Then there’s practical considerations like the number of job openings and competition for those openings, particularly considering the difficulty new nurses have finding work. Finally, there’s the social considerations of moving away from friends and family and starting a new career in a foreign environment.

Given the increasing needs for more nurses, this lack of mobility can be an issue for states with fewer nursing programs and smaller nurse populations. A short term solution is to target your job postings at local nurses. If you haven’t already, making inroads with nearby nursing degree programs can help drive more new applicants to your door.

As for long term, you should create some incentives to encourage out-of-state nurses to move to your area. Scholarships and internships for out-of-state nurses can help you recruit and retain new nurses. Starting an off-hours program where locals show newbies and interns around can help them feel more comfortable in a new town.

One big area to look into is tuition reimbursement. As of 2011, only 69% of healthcare facilities offered tuition reimbursement to first time nurses, down from 86% in 2005. Even offering partial reimbursement can make all the difference for a new nurse deciding where to start his or her career.

What to know about New Nurses: Unemployment

The healthcare industry is facing a shortage of nurses as members of the baby boomer generation retire and the industry expands. The upcoming decades are going to be reliant on new nurses to fill the gaps left by their predecessors. As a manager, what do you know about the people that will make up your staff in upcoming years?  

An experienced RN doesn’t need to worry much about finding work. In 2015, the unemployment rate for RNs was a measly 2%, with the industry expected to increase 19% by 2022.

While this is great news, most of these jobs are going to nurses coming out of retirement. During the recession, many nurses came back to work as pensions lost money and family members lost jobs. The fear of financial instability also convinced many nurses who were close to retirement to keep working.

Like many high-stress fields, healthcare facilities prefer employees with prior work experience. Small mistakes like a forgotten medication or unwritten note can have devastating consequences for patients and managers like to know their staff knows the ropes and can work under pressure.

While the preference for experienced nurses is understandable, many facilities won’t even consider applications from nurses fresh out of school. The RN Work Project found that even though RNs consistently have one of the lowest unemployment rates in the county, unemployment rates for newly licensed registered nurses (NLRNs) roughly tripled between 2005 and 2011, jumping from 15% to 31%.

While job prospects for NLRNs are expected to improve in a few years, many recent graduates are still having trouble finding work. Which is crazy considering how many healthcare facilities are understaffed and that larger nursing staffs have proven health benefits for patients.

In the end, it comes down to if being terminally short staffed is better than hiring a few college grads to pick up slack. Taking the phrase “no new graduates,” out of your job posting will greatly broaden your field of potential applicants, can give a new nurse a much needed chance and ease the burden on your existing staff.