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Pay equity: Who said it?

As a footnote to Rebecca’s post regarding Barton Quoteour reader poll focusing on pay equity between male and female nurses, I want
to share the following quote with you…

Without doing a Google search, can you identify the speaker? Add a comment if so…

Survey says male nurses are paid more than female nurses on your units

Recently, we posted a poll on www.StrategiesForNurseManagers.com and asked whether on your unit male nurses earn more than female nurses for the same role.

Seventy-three percent responded that they do. Only 24% said no, while 4% admitted they don’t know.

Click here to take the poll if you haven’t already done so.

Reminder: Nursing Peer Review Webcast

Just a few more days left until our Nursing Peer Review webcast, NPR2cloud3afeaturing nursing peer review experts Laura Harrington, RN, BSN, MHA, CPHQ, CPCQM, and Marla Smith, MHSA. These authors of the HCPro book Nursing Peer Review, Second Edition: A Practical, Nonpunitive Approach to Case Review, will pack a 90-minute webcast with answers to these questions, and more:

How do you actually do nursing case review? How do you deal
with the outcomes? And how can you use case review to monitor performance and track and trend data? And what are the core requirements for confidentiality? (See below for Don’t Disclose,
a cheat sheet of guidelines, and look for a notice soon for download instructions.)

Developing a structure to support nursing case review is just the first step. Join us on Thursday, April 16, 2015 at 1–2:30 p.m. Eastern to explore the practical requirements of implementing this important process. To register, click here.

Don't Disclose-Peer Review

 

Nursing research: Understanding whistleblowing

Last week I promised a downloadable version of the whistle imagewhistleblower flowchart. For those who are interested, you can access the file here.

When I read about the fallout on Kim Cheely, the nurse whistle-
blower I wrote about last week, I had to ask myself:
Why do nurses risk their jobs to blow the whistle? Why speak out, when there is danger of ostracism, marginalization, and damage to one’s career? I did a bit more research on the subject, and ran across a thought-provoking study published “down under” a few years ago in the Journal of Advanced Nursing. You may find it interesting also.

Using a qualitative narrative inquiry design, the Understanding whistleblowing: Qualitative insights from nurse whistleblowers study looked into the reasons nurses decided to become whistleblowers, and gathered insights into nurses’ experiences of being whistleblowers. I doubt any nurses reading this will be surprised to learn the primary reason behind the decision to blow the whistle.

It’s simple, nurses are patient advocates. Of course there’s much more to the study, and it makes interesting reading for many reasons, not the least of which is that it used face-to-face data collection methods, and based queries on real experiences and not hypothetical scenarios.

In other words, the questions didn’t ask “what would you do” if you faced with wrongdoing. The subjects of this study had worked through the tough decisions and lived through actual whistleblowing events. You can access the report on this study here.

 

The unofficial whistleblower flowchart for nurses

Last week, a whistleblower lawsuit was filed by Kim Cheely, a nurse manager at Georgia Regents Medical Center prior to being fired last October for “insubordination.” In this case, “insubordination” appears to mean that the trusted, 37-year veteran of GRMC dogged management to address quality-of-care concerns related to repeated staff reductions in the oncology and bone marrow transplant units.

The story in The Augusta Chronicle documents a situation where anything that could go wrong, did. Cheely took every logical step she could to affect change, and thought she would be protected from retaliation by invoking the hospital’s conflict resolution policy. This did not turn out well for Cheely, unfortunately. In fact, to be protected as a whistleblower, you must report to the state or national agency responsible for regulation of your employer.

For anyone considering blowing whistleblower flowchartthe whistle, take a look at the flowchart I created from advice offered on the ANA website. The chart, which illustrates just the bare bones, will be available for download later in the week, in case you want to share it with your colleagues.

On a related note: I’m currently reading draft chapters for an upcoming HCPro book, The Nurse Manager’s Legal Companion, by a wonderful nurse and attorney, Dinah Brothers. We’ll also have a handbook for staff nurses. Neither is available for preorder quite yet, but I’ll be sure to let you know when they are.

Men earn more than women in nursing

Men typically earn around $5,000 more than women in the nursing profession, according to a recent study published in JAMA.

Even adjusting for factors such as experience, education, shift, or clinical specialty, the salary gap between men and women is around $5,000.

The Huffington Post quotes lead study author Ulrike Muench from the University of California, San Francisco: “Nursing is the largest female dominated profession so you would think that if any profession could have women achieve equal pay, it would be nursing.”

What do you think of this report? Share your comments below.

Nurse Leader Insider ~ Free E-Zine

NurseLeaderEnvelope The HCPro Nurse Leader Insider newsletter contains news
and articles, plus links to free tools for nurse managers.
Sign up here to have this insightful newsletter delivered
(for free!) to your email inbox every Friday.

 

The Image of Nursing: Speak Up!

In a comment on one of my posts last week, Stefani suggested (strongly) that to improve the image of nursing, we need to speak up. I’m reposting her comment below to draw your attention to it.

I’d like to hear your thoughts about why nurses might not speak up when, by staying silent (out of fear?), their personal self-esteem takes a hit and—more importantly—care standards aren’t maintained. Have you developed techniques that help you overcome fear of confrontation so that you can truly speak up?

Speak Up image

Here are a few resources related to speaking up:

  1.  A terrific article from Susan Gaddis, PhD: Positive, Assertive “Pushback” for Nurses
  2.  A table you will be able to download from our reading room in a few days: Say This, Not That: An Empowerment Glossary for Nurses. Look for it on or before 3/19/15.
  3.  Books written by Kathleen Bartholomew, RN, MN, including Speak Your Truth and Team-Building Handbook: Improving Nurse-Physician Communications.

Improving the image of nursing

Every nurse can play a part in elevating the public perception of the nursing profession. The table below shows you how email, evidence-based research, reasonable work schedules, a diverse workforce, preceptorships, interprofessional communication skills, and name tags can promote the professional image of nursing. This table was adapted from the HCPro book, The Image of Nursing, by Shelley Cohen, RN, MS, CEN and Kathleen Bartholomew, RN, MN.

 imageof nursing table 2

Evidence-Based Practice: A Soundtrack for Nurses

At HCPro, we offer extensive resources designed to help the nursing community build evidence-based practice (EBP) skills and refine strategies for incorporating EBP in daily practice.

EBP Video Clip

From Viva La Evidence, James McCormack

You can find free resources here and purchase books
and videos, including Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing: A Guide to Successful Implementation, here.

What we lack, however, is a musical EBP score to accompany those resources… For that, you’ll have to visit YouTube and view James McCormack’s Viva La Evidence, a parody of Coldplay’s Viva La Vida that sings the praises of evidence-based practice. Enjoy!