RSSAll Entries in the "Hot topics" Category

Free Webcast: Techniques to improve critical-thinking skills

HCPro is celebrating and recognizing nurses all week long with special giveaways, prizes, and promotions.

OnDemandWebcastEnjoy this FREE webcast on us!

Critical Thinking and Patient Outcomes: Engaging Novice and Experienced Nurses

Join renowned critical thinking expert Shelley Cohen, RN, MSN, CEN, for a 90-minute webcast for nurse managers, educators, and nursing professional development specialists about strengthening nursing staff’s critical-thinking skills.

This program provides practical strategies for developing critical-thinking skills in novice and experienced nurses. It discusses how to foster an ongoing program that emphasizes critical-thinking skills and how improved critical thinking can impact patient outcomes.

To access this FREE webcast, enter discount code EW323823 at checkout.

And be sure not to miss…

Yesterday’s post has links to a 20% discount code on all nursing products, a BOGO on books and handbooks, and other activities of interest…

BOGO: Buy one, get one discount on nursing books

Take advantage of HCPro’s Nursing BOGO event: Buy one nursing book at full price
and get the second one at 50% off* now through May 18, 2015.

second bookClick here to download HCPro’s 2015 Nursing Catalogue,
or go straight to our online store to start shopping.

To receive the discount on your second book, please enter
discount code EO323822 at checkout.

*50% off lesser or equal value product.

 

——RECENT POSTS——

⇒ 5/4: Who inspires you? There’s still time to submit your favorite quotes in posted comments, here.

⇒ 5/6: You can still use the 20% Nurses Week discount offered in this post (though it can’t be used in combination with the BOGO discount).

⇒ 5/8: Enter our 10 question survey here for a chance to win a copy of Team-Building Handbook: Improving Nurse-to-Nurse Relationships, by Kathleen Bartholomew.

Enter our nursing survey: You could win a team-building handbook!

Our mission is to provide you with essential tools, articles, tips, and books to support your practice… and we want you to tell us what you need. What kind of challenges do you face? What subjects excite you? Please take a few minutes to answer our 10 question survey, and give us your wish list!

THINTN coverTo thank you for participating in our Nurses Week survey, you also
have an opportunity to win a copy of Kathleen Bartholomew’s
Team-Building Handbook: Improving Nurse-to-Nurse Relationships.
Just complete the survey between now and midnight on May 27, 2015, and provide your contact information on the last page.

Click on the link below to begin the survey:
https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/hcpronurses2015

All of your answers are confidential and anonymous, and your contact info will only be used to let you know if you won a handbook. If you have questions related to the survey, please contact cmoore@hcpro.com.

Thank you!

——RECENT POSTS——

⇒ 5/4: Who inspires you? There’s still time to submit your favorite quotes in posted comments, here.

⇒ 5/6: You can still use the 20% Nurses Week discount offered in this post.

Happy Nurses Week: A thank you to our favorite nurses

Is there any doubt that nurses heal the spirit, as well as HappyNursesWeekthe body?

The stories in The Boston Globe annual “Patients Salute Their Nurses” piece offer an inspiring and humbling testament to all the nursing profession can be.

In 400 thank-you letters from grateful patients, family members, and colleagues, Boston’s nurses received personal acknowledgment and messages of love inspired by their deep commitment to the profession and their patients.

Here are snippets from some of my favorite letters:

Diane goes above and beyond, treating me with dignity and respect, even calling me weekly to check on my weight and well-being. Like a friendly drill sergeant, she reminds me to keep my weight down and to pay attention to what I eat.

Joe provided intense, meticulous, and sensitive care not only to Mike, but also to his extended family. Joe’s quiet and steady presence gave us hope and strength when we needed it most. Mike did not make it through the night, but the blow of his passing was softened by the gift of time that Joe made possible.
[more]

Live webcast: Surgical Environment Compliance: Meet CMS and Joint Commission Requirements

Live webcast: Surgical Environment Compliance: Meet CMS and Joint Commission Requirements

Presented on Friday, May 8th, 2015 at 1:00 – 2:30 P.M (ET)

Presented by Steven A. MacArthur, and Jorge Sosa, CHFM, CHSP, CHC

This 90-minute live webcast will help accreditation and safety professionals get a handle on the unprecedented scrutiny being applied to the management of conditions in the operating room physical environment.  Join Steven A. MacArthur and Jorge Sosa, CHFM, CHSP, CHC, as they address the change in standards regulating humidity levels in operating rooms and the potential effects on equipment and supplies to ensure patient safety.

At the end of the program, participants will be able to:
1. Understand and apply the regulatory requirements as set forth by CMS and The Joint Commission
2. Use design specifications and other guidance
3. Recognize current vulnerabilities in your organization
4. Manage the survey process for the surgical environment now and in the future
5. Promote ongoing compliance

For more information or to register, please visit http://hcmarketplace.com/surgical-environment-compliance.

Don’t Disclose: Peer review confidentiality guidelines download

confidential Recently, I posted an overview of the key confidentiality requirements for
members of the peer review committee. At long last, you can download a copy
of Don’t Disclose here, for the case review committee members in your organization.

Last week’s peer review webcast (presented by Laura Harrington and Marla Smith) was followed by a lively question and answer period. Topics ranged from the meaning of “timely” in terms of completing a review* to the virtues of including a section in your scoring that considers “contributing factors”** … and much more.

You can learn more about the on demand version of the webinar here and the presenters’ nursing peer review book here.

 

 

  * Answer: <90 days

** Answer: Be flexible. If you want to include special factors in scoring, it may help identify process issues to address proactively separate from the review

Pay equity: Who said it?

As a footnote to Rebecca’s post regarding Barton Quoteour reader poll focusing on pay equity between male and female nurses, I want
to share the following quote with you…

Without doing a Google search, can you identify the speaker? Add a comment if so…

Survey says male nurses are paid more than female nurses on your units

Recently, we posted a poll on www.StrategiesForNurseManagers.com and asked whether on your unit male nurses earn more than female nurses for the same role.

Seventy-three percent responded that they do. Only 24% said no, while 4% admitted they don’t know.

Click here to take the poll if you haven’t already done so.

Reminder: Nursing Peer Review Webcast

Just a few more days left until our Nursing Peer Review webcast, NPR2cloud3afeaturing nursing peer review experts Laura Harrington, RN, BSN, MHA, CPHQ, CPCQM, and Marla Smith, MHSA. These authors of the HCPro book Nursing Peer Review, Second Edition: A Practical, Nonpunitive Approach to Case Review, will pack a 90-minute webcast with answers to these questions, and more:

How do you actually do nursing case review? How do you deal
with the outcomes? And how can you use case review to monitor performance and track and trend data? And what are the core requirements for confidentiality? (See below for Don’t Disclose,
a cheat sheet of guidelines, and look for a notice soon for download instructions.)

Developing a structure to support nursing case review is just the first step. Join us on Thursday, April 16, 2015 at 1–2:30 p.m. Eastern to explore the practical requirements of implementing this important process. To register, click here.

Don't Disclose-Peer Review

 

Nursing research: Understanding whistleblowing

Last week I promised a downloadable version of the whistle imagewhistleblower flowchart. For those who are interested, you can access the file here.

When I read about the fallout on Kim Cheely, the nurse whistle-
blower I wrote about last week, I had to ask myself:
Why do nurses risk their jobs to blow the whistle? Why speak out, when there is danger of ostracism, marginalization, and damage to one’s career? I did a bit more research on the subject, and ran across a thought-provoking study published “down under” a few years ago in the Journal of Advanced Nursing. You may find it interesting also.

Using a qualitative narrative inquiry design, the Understanding whistleblowing: Qualitative insights from nurse whistleblowers study looked into the reasons nurses decided to become whistleblowers, and gathered insights into nurses’ experiences of being whistleblowers. I doubt any nurses reading this will be surprised to learn the primary reason behind the decision to blow the whistle.

It’s simple, nurses are patient advocates. Of course there’s much more to the study, and it makes interesting reading for many reasons, not the least of which is that it used face-to-face data collection methods, and based queries on real experiences and not hypothetical scenarios.

In other words, the questions didn’t ask “what would you do” if you faced with wrongdoing. The subjects of this study had worked through the tough decisions and lived through actual whistleblowing events. You can access the report on this study here.