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Ben Franklin’s advice to nurse preceptors

Tell me and I forget.
Teach me and I remember.
Involve me and I learn.

How do you provide preceptees with constructive advice Ben Franklin2
or feedback? Do you tell them what they did wrong and spell out how to correct it? Or do you encourage them to use critical-thinking skills to truly ingrain a personal understanding of ways to improve their practice?

Look at these two approaches to feedback, and see which you think would be more effective. (More examples excerpted from The Preceptor Program Builder can be found in the Reading Room.)

The preceptor observes the preceptee greeting the manager correctly, giving her name, and stating that she is a preceptee. However, she was not wearing her name tag.

Evaluative feedback
Your name tag is missing, and the manager
won’t like it!

Descriptive feedback
You greeted the manager according to the facility protocol.
Can you think of anything that would help your manager remember you?

The descriptive feedback encourages the preceptee to use critical thinking, which illustrates Ben Franklin’s timeless recommendation to “involve me, and I learn.”

If you would like to share “aha” moments and techniques for constructive feedback, please feel free to comment below…

Interprofessional Accountability: Share your successes…

Nurse managers know the value of staff accountability—it’s an essential ingredient in the recipe for consistent, high-quality patient care.

Building those accountability muscles takes on new urgency as the “care continuum” becomes more than a buzz word. Accountability is now the nurse’s greatest challenge, what with the increased pressure on nurses to delegate in order to work at “top of license,” the ongoing need to coordinate care with different in-house professions (pharmacy, social work, etc.), and the necessity of transitioning patients to care by unaffiliated, outside caregivers.

We’re developing an in-service handbook to support staff nurse accountability skills, and are in need of several real-world examples of interprofessional accountability in action. Would you be willing to submit your techniques for effective hand-offs, successful communications, or example scripts to include in the handbook? Leave a comment or send me an email if you do!

For any piece we choose for the book, I’ll send you a copy of either Team-Building Handbook: Improving Nurse-to-Nurse Relationships or Team-Building Handbook: Improving Nurse-Physician Communications, our latest nursing handbooks.

Do you have a compelling idea for a nursing book?

As a leading publisher of nursing and other healthcare products—including books, newsletters, webinars, and online training—HCPro is a great place to publish. If you have an idea for a book or other product that will benefit the profession of nursing, we would like to hear from you.

At HCPro, we value our expert authors as the foundation of our business and strive to build long-term relationships with them. We collaborate with our authors—a diverse and knowledgeable group of people focused on creating a personally satisfying and improved healthcare workplace for themselves and their colleagues. The nurses, nurse educators, and nurse managers who read our books appreciate our focus on quality, from project inception through collaborative development, publication, and distribution.

Whether you want to write a book, blog post, or article, or create a webinar, we’ll provide you with the feedback and tools you need to be successful. Contact us for more information.

Some topics we’re interested in: Managing intergenerational teams, delegation and supervision across the care continuum, charge nurse insights, creating a culture of safety, effective communications.

Nurses Week giveaway: Free excerpt from Ending Nurse-To-Nurse Hostility and a chance to win a copy!

HCPro has celebrated nurses all week long with special giveaways, prizes, and promotions.

We are giving away an exclusive excerpt from the brand-new edition of Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility!

In this excerpt, Kathleen Bartholomew, RN, MN, is shining a light on horizontal hostility in nursing school. Read about the effect of horizontal hostility and bullying in nursing school and the positive ways nursing students can be supported and mentored as they begin their nursing career.

Download the excerpt here.

Plus you can also enter to win a free copy of the book!

We are giving away five copies of Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility. Be among the first to read the newly updated book from nursing communication expert Kathleen Bartholomew, RN, MN.

Almost 50% of former nurses cite horizontal hostility as their reason for leaving the profession. Beat the statistics! Read this groundbreaking book and discover all-new strategies and solutions to improve the nursing culture at your organization.

Enter here for your chance to win.

Poll results: Using technology to connect with patients

Last month, I posted about the ways that technology could improve patients’ communication with nurses but could also place a greater burden on nurses for round-the-clock care and feedback. To get a feel for how often nurses used technology and social media to interact with patients, we posted a poll on StrategiesForNurseManagers.com asking nurses and other healthcare professionals to weigh in.

Approximately three-quarters (74%) of those who participated in the poll responded that they did not use social networking sites such as Twitter, Facebook, or LinkedIn to interact with patients, while the remaining 26% replied that they do use those technologies for patient interaction.

While these results indicate that social networking sites have not become a place for healthcare communications, I still wonder whether nurses and other practitioners use other forms of technology, such as emails, listervs, or websites, to share information with patients and respond to questions about treatment plans. As mentioned previously, these resources have the potential to improve patient care, but they must be leveraged appropriately.

How do you communicate and follow up with patients outside of their scheduled appointment times? Leave a comment below!

Social media as a healthcare business tool

American Medical News released a story last month highlighting four ways that social media can be used to improve a medical practice. By now, many people in the healthcare industry recognize that social media can be a powerful tool for communicating with patients, albeit a tool that can have terrible consequences when used incorrectly. The article from American Medical News focuses its attention on social media as a business intelligence resource and customer service tool, as well as a means for reporting to move toward improved care and outcomes. Although the article is primarily focused on how physicians can use social media, the principles discussed can be applied by any leaders within a healthcare organization.

One of the main topics of discussion in the article is using social media to gain insight into what services patients are seeking and what obstacles patients are facing. By identifying health trends and reacting with targeted programs and informational posts, healthcare leaders can use social media to address patient needs quickly and effectively.

Similarly, social media can be a platform for addressing complaints, negative comments, and feedback from patients. Practitioners should exercise caution in keeping specific details about patients offline and out of the public sphere, but can nonetheless use social media channels to provide an apology and offer to correct a situation. Ideally, the disgruntled patient feels as though his or her complaints are being addressed in a timely manner, while other patients see that customer service is a priority for the organization.

Given the ubiquity of social media in most patients’ lives, as well as the nearly non-existent cost of creating and maintaining social media sites, using these resources makes sense for any organization looking to improve patient engagement and interaction. As for any business, developing and implementing an effective social media initiative for a healthcare organization requires careful planning, proper management, and constant monitoring and maintenance. But the benefits of improving overall quality and patient satisfaction could make social media engagement well worth the effort.

What are your thoughts on social media as a tool for healthcare organizations? Does your organization use social media in the ways described here? Leave a comment and share your thoughts!

Apologies and action for famous actors only?

Hospital chief Sandra Coletta is making waves throughout the healthcare community after being frank with her audience of hundreds at the 10th annual dinner of Medically Induced Trauma Support Services (MITSS), a widely respected group that aims to support patients, families, and staffs after things go medically wrong.

She spoke about the death of James Woods’ brother in the emergency department at Kent Hospital in Warwick, RI, after orders were not carried out in a timely manner.

“Quite honestly, I did nothing other than what my mother taught me,” Coletta said of apologizing.

James Woods and the hospital settled the suit, in the process created a foundation, the Michael J. Woods Institute, in honor of his brother. The institute aims to recreate healthcare from a human factors perspective.

Similar action was taken after Dennis Quaid’s twins were put in peril because of a medication administration mistake. (According to an April 2010 USA Today story, Quaid said Cedars-Sinai hospital in LA “stepped up to the plate and spent millions of dollars on bedside bar codes.” He and his wife also created the Quaid Foundation, which has merged with the Texas Medical Institute of Technology.) Do you think these cases are addressed more swiftly, and more apologetically, because of their high-profile nature? Or do you think the tides are turning?

Of course, Sorrel King, without being famous (at least then), spurred plenty of action on her own. But are hospitals finally reacting with action and apologies, even without fame and publicity?

Source: WBUR

First published on Patient Safety Monitor Blog.

One of your nurses will make an error today. Will she report it?

Be prepared for errors and develop a culture where near misses are reported—and learned from—with the best practices presented in the 90-minute audio conference Learn From Errors and Near Misses with a Just Culture: Stop Punishing Nurses for Mistakes. Experts Cole Edmonson, DNP, RN, FACHE, NEA-BC, and Lucy Bird, RN, ONC, live the Just Culture experience every day and will demonstrate what to do when the worst happens to support clinicians, learn from mistakes, and build a culture of accountability and high-reliability.

Find answers to all your questions about improving patient safety and increasing nurse satisfaction by building a Just Culture in your facility.

For more information or to order, call 800/650-6787 and mention Source Code EZINEADp1 or visit the HCPro Healthcare Marketplace.

Enter HCPro’s nurse leader best practices contest

Enter HCPro’s nurse leader contest and share best practices with your peers!

How do you deal with horizontal hostility among your employees? Do you have one staff nurse who makes the unit toxic every time he or she is on the floor? Or a clique who spreads gossip and makes others feel uncomfortable? Share your advice, best practices, and stories on this topic for the chance to win a free book.

The rules: To enter, simply share a recent success story, advice, or policy that has helped your unit become a healthy work environment. The sky is the limit—as long as your entry somehow helped implement positive change, it qualifies! If you are sending a sample policy or tool, please include a short paragraph explaining the goal of the sample.

The prize: The winner, chosen at random from all entries, will receive their choice of one of HCPro’s training resources for nurse managers:

The deadline: We will draw our winner at the end of the business day on Friday, September 16, 2011, and announce the winner in the Monday, September 26 edition of Nurse Leader Weekly.

The best entries will be posted individually on The Leaders’ Lounge Blog.

Please send contest entries to rhendren@hcpro.com. If you have any questions about the contest itself, please feel free to contact me any time.

Free webcast about ending bullying and toxic behavior in nursing

A live, free, 60-minute webcast, A Conversation with Kathleen Bartholomew: End Bullying and Toxic Behavior Once and For All, is being offered by HCPro Tuesday, October 4, 2011, 1:00-2:00 p.m. (Eastern).

Bartholomew is a visionary nurse leader who dared to ask the question: How can a profession that is based on caring include such uncaring behaviors? Her research exposes the toxic relationships and bullying behavior that cause nurse burnout and threaten patient safety.

During the presentation Bartholomew will share her experiences through true stories about the struggles she has faced and overcome and give listeners the tools and strategies to end disruptive behavior once and for all.

Click here to learn more about this program.

Due to the inspirational nature of this program, HCPro is placing no limits on who can attend. Invite your staff, friends, or colleagues. Forward information to a friend now.