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HCPro seeks part-time Lead Nurse Planner

HCPro, a division of BLR, is seeking a Lead Nurse Planner to assist with planning Continuing Nursing Education (CNE) activities and to ensure all HCPro CNE activities comply with current American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC) Commission on Accreditation (COA) criteria. The lead nurse planner may be located anywhere in the country as participation in the planning of these activities will be conducted through phone calls, conference calls, and emails.

The right candidate will be a currently registered RN with a master’s degree or higher, and with either the baccalaureate or graduate degree in nursing. Additionally, the Lead Nurse Planner must have education or experience in the field of education or adult learning.

To find out more about the position, visit http://www.blr.com/About/Careers. Interested candidates can submit resumes to careers@blr.com.

Are you ready for National Nurses Week?

It is almost time to begin the celebrations for National Nurses Week, whose theme this year is “Nurses: Leading the Way.”

Each day during National Nurses Week, HCPro will be celebrating by offering exciting giveaways and special promotions. Keep an eye on your email for a chance to register to win!

Many managers and healthcare organizations enjoy rewarding nurses at this special time with a gift that treats, celebrates, or encourages their nursing staff. This year, consider the gift of professional development with a book from HCPro. Thank your staff with one of these nursing resources.

Provide professional support for nurses on the go

Quick-E Pro: Time Management: A Guide For Nurses by Debbie Buchwach, BSN, RN-BC

Give your staff the gift of less stress for National Nurses Week with these handy guides that are filled with real-world advice and designed to help nurses better manage their time, avoid burnout, and improve their work-life balance. Provide the coaching they need to develop and succeed with Quick-E! Pro Time Management: A Guide for Nurses. Click here for more information.

You might also be interested in:

Quick-E! Pro Scripting: A Guide for Nurses, which helps nurses communicate clearly and confidently with patients, physicians, and peers.

Quick-E! Pro: Evidence-Based Practice: A Guide for Nurses, which walks nurses through how to find evidence and critique literature and therefore make evidence-based practice a top priority for themselves and your organization.

Effective self-marketing is essential to a successful job search

Editor’s note: The following blog post was written and contributed by Michelle Mercurio, National Director of Career Services, Chamberlain College of Nursing.

You read the guides to a successful job search. You put in the time. You paid attention to detail, distributing your pristine resume at career fairs and professional networking events. You even practiced an elevator pitch to highlight your credentials and what you are looking for in your next opportunity.

So why haven’t you landed a new job?

If you were diligent about your search, chances are you were following a comprehensive checklist of tactics to find your next position. However, now may be the time to ask yourself if you are just running through the motions and “checking the box” on these steps, or if you are approaching your search like a true marketeer.

What’s a Marketeer?   

We know that marketers use strategies such as product placement, advertising, public relations, brand management and social media promotion to sell goods and services to consumers. Similarly, the word marketeer is defined by Merriam-Webster as “a specialist in promoting or selling a product or service.”

But there’s more to the role than the literal definition; the word marketeer conjures images of a champion marketer who stops at nothing to ensure that the product for sale is seen as a necessity by the consumer. A career marketeer applies those same strategies and promotion principles to ensure that he or she is seen as a necessity to an employer.

Be a Marketeer

Being a marketeer applies to everyone, not solely people in traditional business careers. People in all types of industries, including healthcare and education, should apply these principles to determine the next steps in a job search.

Conduct a self-analysis of all of your promotional channels – including you!

  • Audit your resume, cover letter, social networking profiles, and all personal promotion tools to ensure that they are concise and contain action words and achievements that convey the high energy necessary to drive engagement and interest from others. Clean up any imperfections, misspellings, or irrelevant information – they only serve as distractions and may detract from your credibility.
  • Analyze your job search process and identify opportunities to maximize your time. This is the strategy part of your job search. You want to reexamine those promotional activities that did not yield feedback from hiring managers. Move forward with the actions that are generating a positive response. If none of your efforts are generating a response, check in with your contacts and increase your networking.

Test the market and increase your networking.

  • Ask a few trusted contacts to spend 10 minutes reviewing your resume, cover letter, social media profiles, and in-person interview attire. Then ask them for their candid tips on how to improve your presence online and in-person.
  • Do more than just attend a career fair or networking event. Research industry topics and engage at least three new contacts in relevant discussion. Volunteer to chair an industry-related committee or lead a project. Follow up, and follow through. For example, for a nurse who is seeking a nurse manager position, this may mean volunteering to help with a community health expo in your spare time to show your business and teamwork abilities.
  • Help them help you. Ask your contacts if you can help them with a project – and then do so enthusiastically. You can strengthen your relationship with a new contact and also reinvigorate your job search by applying your skills.

Promote your brand in all interactions – and then align it with the opportunity pipeline.

  • In his 1997 article for Fast CompanyThe Brand Called You,” Tom Peters highlights the necessity of personal branding. The advice contained in this article is still very relevant for job hunters today; reference this article for ways to create and promote your brand.
  • Prepare to “wow” during your next elevator pitch and interview; instead of reciting your abilities and desires, align your communication with the available opportunity. In other words, know your audience and show how your personal brand is important to helping them achieve their goals.
  • Rally people around you by bringing energy to all of your interactions and staying positive. Infusing your interactions with excitement and camaraderie can leave a lasting impression and can increase your chances of being remembered when it comes time to hire.

Most importantly, after you do land your new career position, carry your marketeer perspective into the workplace to ensure a successful start and future growth opportunities!

 


Live webcast: Onboarding New Graduate Nurses

HCPro will present a live, 90-minute webcast on Tuesday, September 18, 2012 at 1:00-2:30 (Eastern). Onboarding New Graduate Nurses: How to Overcome Hurdles and Retain New Nurses demonstrates how the onboarding process for new graduate nurses will increase retention and speed up professional growth.

Join nursing professional development experts Diana Swihart, PhD, DMin, MSN, APN CS, RN-BC, and Jim Hansen, MSN, RN-BC, as they provide strategies for helping new graduate nurses navigate their first job hurdles through the onboarding process, from pre-hire to a successful transition into professional practice. Moving new graduates beyond academic theory and technical skill to become competent, confident, professional nurses begins with onboarding.

Here’s a look at the agenda for the webcast:

  • Pre-hire onboarding: Externships, selective hiring, BCAT, physicals, medication administration exams, and interviews
    • Workplace demographics and roles of new graduates in workforce metrics
  • General and unit-specific orientation: The roles of internships, preceptorships, and unit orientation
    • Cultural and social integration
    • Trusting clinical decisions through critical thinking and clinical judgment
    • Early career support
    • Developing skills in organization, prioritization, and delegation to build professional competence and confidence
  • Transitioning into the professional role best practice: a Nurse Residency Program
    • Essential knowledge, skills, and abilities for their new role: Moving beyond technical skills to professionalism

There will also be a live question and answer session following the program.

This webcast promises to be a great resource for nurse managers, assistant nurse managers, nurse leaders, charge nurses, directors of nursing, patient care managers, directors of patient care, directors of staff development, nursing professional development specialists, chief nursing officers, VPs of nursing, VPs of patient care services, and nurse residency coordinators. Sign up now and pay one price for your entire staff!

For more information or to sign up for the webcast, please visit www.hcmarketplace.com.

Nurses Week: Nursing catalogue discount

Looking for new resources and training materials for your nursing staff? You’re in luck, because today in honor of National Nurses Week, HCPro is offering a 30% discount on anything in our nursing catalogue.

You can find the HCPro 2012 Nursing Catalogue at http://www.hcpro.com/NursingCat2012. This is a great opportunity to check out our newest books, educational packages, and training materials.

Please enter source code NRSWK2012 at checkout to receive your 30% discount.

Tomorrow we will feature our final offer for Nurses Week. Be sure to brush up on your nursing knowledge and check back here!

Nurses Week: Training video discount

Today we’re celebrating Nurses Week by offering 30% off the price of any of our nursing training videos. Our videos cover topics such as effective mentoring, improved communication, nurse-to-nurse relationships, and accountability in nursing. Visit HCPro’s Healthcare Marketplace to browse our selection of training videos!

Please enter source code NRSWK2012 when placing your order to receive your 30% discount.

What offer do we have in store next? You’ll have to visit again tomorrow to find out!

Take our survey for a chance to win $100!

HCPro is asking for your help! To ensure that we meet your training products and services needs in 2012, please take a moment to respond to a short survey.

Do you work in infection control? Take this survey.

Complete a survey and be entered into a drawing to win a $100 gift certificate to HCMarketplace, to be spent on any HCPro product of your choice.

Thanks!

Making the leap from “one of us” to “one of them”

One day you’re part of the group. Helping each other out, complaining about never having the supplies you want when you need them, and chipping in for pot luck holiday meals. The next, you’re promoted to manager and suddenly you become “one of them.”

Becoming a nurse manager is a tough transition for anyone, but it’s even harder when you become manager of the same unit where you worked as a staff nurse. Suddenly, you’re the one with the power—you can finally make the decisions you’ve always wanted to—but you also have all the responsibility.

One of the hardest issues to navigate is reconfiguring the relationships between yourself and your former peers. It’s key to acknowledge that the relationship has changed and that your new role is quite different.

Shelley Cohen, RN, MS, CEN, president of Health Resources Unlimited, and staunch nurse manager advocate, has written that the first things to do is obtain a copy of your job description and share it with staff. That was, they understand what you’re accountable for and what your priorities will be. [more]

The importance of succession planning and training nurse managers

By Betty Noyes, RN, MA

The management gap in healthcare is a real and increasing issue of concern. We do not seem to have enough talented managers to meet the goals of our organizations.

Without sufficient skills, first-line managers do not benefit an organization. The first step to increase the number and education of managers is to provide effective training designed to specifically improve organizational performance.

Currently, healthcare costs are high. When all elements of healthcare reform are implemented, higher costs may ensue. There will be a demand for more change and greater resilience from our management teams. Unless we have managers who are resourceful in their management skills, we will not achieve new and improved ways to succeed in the goals of safe, high-quality care at a reasonable cost.

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Four basic rules for engaging direct-care nurses in quality improvement

To engage direct-care nurses, nurse leaders need to follow four basic rules:

1. Be transparent with your staff at all times

2. Make accountability for improvement at the unit and staff nurse levels

3. Give your staff the tools to succeed

4. Continually reward and recognize improvement

Here is a more in-depth look at each of the four basic rules. [more]