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Survey says male nurses are paid more than female nurses on your units

Recently, we posted a poll on www.StrategiesForNurseManagers.com and asked whether on your unit male nurses earn more than female nurses for the same role.

Seventy-three percent responded that they do. Only 24% said no, while 4% admitted they don’t know.

Click here to take the poll if you haven’t already done so.

Reminder: Nursing Peer Review Webcast

Just a few more days left until our Nursing Peer Review webcast, NPR2cloud3afeaturing nursing peer review experts Laura Harrington, RN, BSN, MHA, CPHQ, CPCQM, and Marla Smith, MHSA. These authors of the HCPro book Nursing Peer Review, Second Edition: A Practical, Nonpunitive Approach to Case Review, will pack a 90-minute webcast with answers to these questions, and more:

How do you actually do nursing case review? How do you deal
with the outcomes? And how can you use case review to monitor performance and track and trend data? And what are the core requirements for confidentiality? (See below for Don’t Disclose,
a cheat sheet of guidelines, and look for a notice soon for download instructions.)

Developing a structure to support nursing case review is just the first step. Join us on Thursday, April 16, 2015 at 1–2:30 p.m. Eastern to explore the practical requirements of implementing this important process. To register, click here.

Don't Disclose-Peer Review

 

Nursing research: Understanding whistleblowing

Last week I promised a downloadable version of the whistle imagewhistleblower flowchart. For those who are interested, you can access the file here.

When I read about the fallout on Kim Cheely, the nurse whistle-
blower I wrote about last week, I had to ask myself:
Why do nurses risk their jobs to blow the whistle? Why speak out, when there is danger of ostracism, marginalization, and damage to one’s career? I did a bit more research on the subject, and ran across a thought-provoking study published “down under” a few years ago in the Journal of Advanced Nursing. You may find it interesting also.

Using a qualitative narrative inquiry design, the Understanding whistleblowing: Qualitative insights from nurse whistleblowers study looked into the reasons nurses decided to become whistleblowers, and gathered insights into nurses’ experiences of being whistleblowers. I doubt any nurses reading this will be surprised to learn the primary reason behind the decision to blow the whistle.

It’s simple, nurses are patient advocates. Of course there’s much more to the study, and it makes interesting reading for many reasons, not the least of which is that it used face-to-face data collection methods, and based queries on real experiences and not hypothetical scenarios.

In other words, the questions didn’t ask “what would you do” if you faced with wrongdoing. The subjects of this study had worked through the tough decisions and lived through actual whistleblowing events. You can access the report on this study here.

 

Change agent: Download your action plan for new staff

preceptor package

Yesterday I promised you a free tool adapted from
The Preceptor Program Builder, by Diana Swihart
and Solimar Figueroa.


If you’d like to download their Action Plan for New Nurses, you’ll find it here

Change is good: An action plan for new nurses

As a nurse manager, one of your challenges is to lead the change process for your staff. And, while new procedures and practices need to be assimilated by your experienced staff members as they arise, your new nurses experience the greatest number of changes every day as they transition to service from preceptorship.

Unfortunately, by and large, people are programmed not to change. New staff members may think that the skills learned in school or in a previous position will map directly to your workplace, and they will tend to fall back on the way things were done before. You, on the other hand, need them to adapt quickly, putting behaviors learned in orientation to work. In other words, you need them to change.

Try using the action plan below to help identify specific areas to address. It will give you the framework you both need to keep improving and changing.

Note: Check back tomorrow for a link to download this tool from our library of nurse manager resources. It is adapted from The Preceptor Program Builder, by Diana Swihart and Solimar Figueroa.

ActionPlan

Nurse Leader Insider ~ Free E-Zine

NurseLeaderEnvelope The HCPro Nurse Leader Insider newsletter contains news
and articles, plus links to free tools for nurse managers.
Sign up here to have this insightful newsletter delivered
(for free!) to your email inbox every Friday.

 

Nurses: Say This, Not That

Power can be taken, but not given. The process of the taking is empowerment in itself.
—Gloria Steinem

In a recent post, I promised a free tool adapted from The Image of Nursing.
If you’d like to download SAY THIS, NOT THAT: An Empowerment Glossary for
Nurses,
you’ll find it here. And while you’re waiting for the download, try this: 

If you hear yourself saying:

No one notices my contributions  

Say this instead:

I’d like to share with you how I’ve handled this situation

 

March 19 is Certified Nurses Day!

Congratulations to all Certified Nurses out there! Obtaining a national board certification in your specialty takes hard work and a commitment to professional excellence. It demonstrates that you have advanced skills and knowledge that enables you to provide a deeper level of patient care and ensure improved patient outcomes.

In your time in nursing, have you seen an increase in the number of nurses who obtain their professional certification? If you have a certification, how has it changed your practice?

Leave a comment below and let us know.

Evidence-Based Practice: A Soundtrack for Nurses

At HCPro, we offer extensive resources designed to help the nursing community build evidence-based practice (EBP) skills and refine strategies for incorporating EBP in daily practice.

EBP Video Clip

From Viva La Evidence, James McCormack

You can find free resources here and purchase books
and videos, including Evidence-Based Practice in Nursing: A Guide to Successful Implementation, here.

What we lack, however, is a musical EBP score to accompany those resources… For that, you’ll have to visit YouTube and view James McCormack’s Viva La Evidence, a parody of Coldplay’s Viva La Vida that sings the praises of evidence-based practice. Enjoy!

Do you have a compelling idea for a nursing book?

As a leading publisher of nursing and other healthcare products—including books, newsletters, webinars, and online training—HCPro is a great place to publish. If you have an idea for a book or other product that will benefit the profession of nursing, we would like to hear from you.

At HCPro, we value our expert authors as the foundation of our business and strive to build long-term relationships with them. We collaborate with our authors—a diverse and knowledgeable group of people focused on creating a personally satisfying and improved healthcare workplace for themselves and their colleagues. The nurses, nurse educators, and nurse managers who read our books appreciate our focus on quality, from project inception through collaborative development, publication, and distribution.

Whether you want to write a book, blog post, or article, or create a webinar, we’ll provide you with the feedback and tools you need to be successful. Contact us for more information.

Some topics we’re interested in: Managing intergenerational teams, delegation and supervision across the care continuum, charge nurse insights, creating a culture of safety, effective communications.