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Throwback Thursday: Your 10 Step Guide to a Rockin’ New Year

By Carol Ebert, RN, BSN, MA, CHES, CWP

The word TRANSITION means the passage from one form, state, style, or place to another – CHANGE!  Some of you are cringing thinking about change, but others are thinking – BRING IT ON!  How many transitions are you experiencing right now?  From holiday over-eating to New Year reckonings about weight?  From worrying about money to wondering what else you could do to increase your income?  From working in a job that is not a fit for you to wondering what else you could be doing? From leaving the workforce to enter the world of retirement and not knowing how to adjust? Transitions are everywhere at any time and can be perceived as negative or positive.  I prefer the latter and have some thoughts to consider.

T – Trust your instincts.  Rather than be caught off guard when things change, take the high road and note what your gut is telling you about what it going on. Keep in mind the change you are experiencing might be just what you have been secretly wanting!

R – Reset your eating and exercise program.  Have you been stuck and know you want to get healthier but not sure how to make the first move? I’m sure you have dealt with this before, so reflect on what helped you be successful in the past and recreate those steps.

A – Adjust your thinking from I CAN’T to I CAN.  See yourself healthy, happy and whole.  Send time every day imagining yourself being your best and being grateful for all that you are and have.  Hang up pictures to visually represent what your goals look like so you can start living in that body even before you get there.

N – Notice what you need right now. Go outside right now for a walk.  Yes – right now!  By yourself!  Take a notepad and pen along because great ideas are sure to surface while you are walking and you may want to write them down before you lose them.  Focus as you walk on what you really need right now to move forward thru this transition. This will be your starting point.

S – Set goals in alignment with your values to create the life you love.  Have you ever taken the time to really ask yourself what you want? Yes, you know what your mother wants for you, what your kids want, what your partner wants, and what you “should” want.  But what do you really want?  Write down 3 dreams you have for a more complete life and post it where you can ponder it.

I – Integrate all your skills into a single focus.  By now you have probably acquired a lot of great life and work skills that make you the fantastic talented person you are.  During this transition, you might find that it is time to put them all to good use and see what emerges.  Write down a list of everything you are great at – write until you can’t think of anything else – at least 30 things.

T – Train yourself for new skills.  After I had acquired all the skills I thought I needed in life, I opened up myself to what might be next for me – the key – being open to possibilities.  What showed up for me was “wellness coaching”, or some people call it “life coaching”.  When I was searching for “what’s next for me”, a friend coached me and after just 2 sessions, I had a new direction, a plan, and I was on my way again.  I loved the experience so much, I was trained to be a coach as well as a coach trainer.

I – Invite new opportunities.  When I was transitioning out of the workforce and into my own independent wellness business, I needed to figure out how to earn money while still doing the work I am passionate about.  Because I remained open to new ideas, I was presented with a way to help people get healthy as well as make passive income that could grow over time.  The key was to stay open to new ideas and give them a chance to see if they could work for you.

O – Own up to what is best for you. Not sure what direction to take as you transition?  Your guide should be how you “feel” about what you decide to do.  As they say, if it feels right – do it?

N – Now is the time to reinvent yourself.  I wrote a whole chapter on this in the book Wise Women Speak – Choosing Stepping Stones Along the Path.  My gift to you is a free download of this chapter by logging on to my website http://carolebert.com/meet-carol/free-ebook/

Enjoy the process of your transition.  Remember, it’s about the journey not the destination.  Fun times ahead!  Contact me at any time for support – carol@carolebert.com.

Tips for recommitting to nursing in the new year

The new year is often a time for retrospection and reflection, especially when it comes to your career. If you’re starting to feel burnt out on nursing but not quite ready for a career change, here is some advice to freshen things up in the new year.

  • Reflect on your past: Sometimes the best way to go forward is to look back. What drew you to nursing in the first place? Why was a career in nursing right for you? Think about the positive experiences you’ve had as a nurse that reaffirmed your career goals. Treat your next shift like it’s your first day; what excites you? What makes you nervous? Sometimes asking these questions can reinvigorate how you approach your work.
  • Connect (and disconnect): If you’re feeling down about your job, sometimes the best solution is to ask for help. Reach out to your peers and develop a support system to help yourself and others. If you think there’s something that could make you happier at work, talk to your managers about it; sometimes a small change can have a profound effect. It’s also important to let go sometimes. Being a caregiver, interacting with patients at some of the worst times in their lives can negatively impact your outlook and make your job even more difficult. Try to focus on the good you’ve done for patients and don’t take it personally when a patient struggles or suffers.
  • Commit to the new: Even though it doesn’t always feel like it, taking on new challenges can be a great way to energize your career. Seek out new experiences and opportunities; take the frustrations of the day and channel it toward learning a new skill or pursuing additional training options. Reflecting on your weaknesses can be difficult at first, but identifying them and working towards improvement can be satisfying and build you confidence. Another great way to embrace the new is working with nursing students or new nurses. They bring energy and enthusiasm to the job, and becoming a preceptor or informal mentor can be a great way to grow your own enthusiasm while furthering your career.

 

The dangers of compassion fatigue

Nurses are the frontline of patient care, making them the most susceptible to compassion fatigue, a state of mental exhaustion caused by caring for patients and their family through times of distress. It’s important that nurse managers are aware of the risks, identify the signs in their staff, and provide guidance to nurses that need it. While the increase in stress and unhappiness caused by compassion fatigue are evident, some of the other consequences are less obvious:

Increased medical risk: Compassion fatigue can lead to an increase in medical errors due to a lack of communication or inability to react. Nurses suffering fatigue can become unsympathetic, self-centered, and preoccupied, to the detriment of a patient’s care. To read more about this connection and how to counter it, check out Reduce Nurse Stress and Reduce Medical Error from HealthLeaders Media.

Decreased retention: The increased stress and potential trauma associated with compassion fatigue can drive new nurses away from the field. The American Association of Colleges of Nurse reports that 13% of newly licensed RNs work in a different career within a year of receiving their license, and 37% said they were ready to change careers. Many reported that the significant, ongoing emotional stress was a factor in their dissatisfaction.

For more information on combating nurse fatigue, check out the Health and Wellness section of the Strategies for Nurse Managers Reading Room:

Don’t underestimate damage caused by burned out nurses

Preventing nurse fatigue
Beat nursing stress and stay calm and collected

What providers can do this National Suicide Prevention Week

National Suicide Prevention Week is September 10-16, bringing awareness to the 10th leading cause of death in the United States. This week is a time for physicians, nurses, and other providers to learn more about how their healthcare organizations can help suicidal patients.

In 2013, 9.3 million adults had suicidal thoughts, 1.3 million attempted suicide, and 41,149 died. Even more worrying is that the rate of suicides has increased 24% between 1999 and 2014. And as of March 2017, Joint Commission surveyors have been putting special focus on suicide, self-harm, and ligature observations in psychiatric units and hospitals. Surveyors are documenting all observations of self-harm risks, and evaluating whether the facility has:

  • Identified these risks before
    •    Has plans to deal with these risks
    •    Conducted an effective environmental risk assessment process

To learn more about suicide prevention in healthcare, check out the following websites and articles.

Resources

Study: Nurse fatigue on the rise

A new survey indicates that fatigue affects 85 percent of nurses, and more than half of nurses have experienced burnout.

The study, conducted by Kronos Incorporated, surveyed 257 nurses currently working in U.S. hospitals. Nearly all of the respondents (98%) said their work is physically and mentally demanding, and 63 percent reported that their work caused nurse burnout. 44 percent worried that their patient care would suffer because of their exhaustion, and 41 percent considered changing hospitals in the past year because of their burnout.

Nurse fatigue has a number of causes, and can occur during any shift. An excess of fatigue without proper coping mechanism can cause burnout, an exhaustion that can cause your staff feel alienated from their work and cause diminished performance.

The best way to counter burnout in your staff is to create programs that encourage self-care and raise awareness about the symptoms of nurse fatigue. For more tips about coping with burnout, check out the following articles from the Strategies for Nurse Managers’ Reading Room:

Preventing nurse fatigue
Take Five: How renewal rooms revive stressed out nurses
Don’t underestimate damage caused by burned out nurses
Stop requiring nurses to work overtime

Educating staff about compassion fatigue

While many nurses know about compassion fatigue, they might not know exactly what it is, why it happens, or how to identify it in themselves. In a recent blog post, Jennifer Lelwica Buttaccio tackled some of the most common myths associated with compassion fatigue.

Not me!
One of the most common misconceptions about compassion fatigue is that your compassion is a limited resource, and if you can still feel compassion for a patient, it must not pertain to you. More likely, you will experience symptoms in other aspects of your life, such as physical or mental exhaustion, dreading going to work, worrying and dwelling on possible errors, or becoming easily frustrated with coworkers. So even if you feel empathetic while you’re with a patient, you could still be suffering from compassion fatigue.

Work harder! Nurses tend to throw themselves into their job head-first, but that approach can be detrimental when dealing with compassion fatigue; your instinct to work harder to overcome challenges at work will not help you here. It’s important to maintain a work-life balance, and compassion fatigue is often caused by overwork and neglecting yourself.

Patients first! Nurses take great pride in the care they give to their patients, but it should not come at the cost of caring for yourself. The best way to provide consistent and outstanding patient care is to take care of yourself first, by taking time for yourself, away from alarms, patients, and colleagues. Make sure that both you and your staff take their breaks and use their time off.

Check out the articles below for more information about compassion fatigue and solutions to your health and wellness problems.
Preventing nurse fatigue
Take Five: How renewal rooms revive stressed out nurses
Worker Wellness: Fatigue and Burnout

Free Excerpt from HCPro’s new Critical Thinking book!

Avoiding Autopilot

CTB Cover

Rarely are we genuinely thoughtless—that is, without thought. But often we are not giving our thoughts much consideration. In today’s world, there is much distraction and sometimes we are guilty of distracting ourselves just to prevent our minds from focusing on the things that are most important (electronic devices proliferate and give us many opportunities to engage in mindlessness). So, to be genuinely able to think about thinking, we must avoid going onto autopilot.

Autopilot is the state of being where we are largely going through the motions, not thoughtfully engaged in the activities of life. It is when we arrive at our destination but cannot remember the traffic on our commute, or taking the last turn or even whether we stopped for the traffic signal or not—it happens to all of us, and that is autopilot. The key is in recognizing when it is happening and being willing and able to intercept your unconscious mind and instead coax it to be present in the real-life situation you’re living. It is learning to move our conscious mind from nowhere to now here—a subtle but essential difference!

Being present in the moment is the essence of mindfulness, and it is powerful! Mindfulness wakes us up to sensations we have been failing to notice. It reveals patterns in our activities that we’ve become blind to. It permits us the full engagement in the reality happening in front of us and even within us, silently, steadfastly, sacredly. Mindfulness may enable us to improve our health, connect more successfully to other people, enlarge our thinking, focus our perception, and even strengthen our intuition. Mindfulness is the polar opposite of autopilot!

To read more, visit the HCPro Marketplace

 

Tips for recommitting to nursing in the new year

The new year is often a time for retrospection and reflection, especially when it comes to your career. If you’re starting to feel burnt out on nursing but not quite ready for a career change, here is some advice to freshen things up in the new year.

  • Reflect on your past: Sometimes the best way to go forward is to look back. What drew you to nursing in the first place? Why was a career in nursing right for you? Think about the positive experiences you’ve had as a nurse that reaffirmed your career goals. Treat your next shift like it’s your first day; what excites you? What makes you nervous? Sometimes asking these questions can reinvigorate how you approach your work.
  • Connect (and disconnect): If you’re feeling down about your job, sometimes the best solution is to ask for help. Reach out to your peers and develop a support system to help yourself and others. If you think there’s something that could make you happier at work, talk to your managers about it; sometimes a small change can have a profound effect.

    It’s also important to let go sometimes. Being a caregiver, interacting with patients at some of the worst times in their lives can negatively impact your outlook and make your job even more difficult. Try to focus on the good you’ve done for patients and don’t take it personally when a patient struggles or suffers.

  • Commit to the new: Even though it doesn’t always feel like it, taking on new challenges can be a great way to energize your career. Seek out new experiences and opportunities; take the frustrations of the day and channel it toward learning a new skill or pursuing additional training options. Reflecting on your weaknesses can be difficult at first, but identifying them and working towards improvement can be satisfying and build you confidence.

    Another great way to embrace the new is working with nursing students or new nurses. They bring energy and enthusiasm to the job, and becoming a preceptor or informal mentor can be a great way to grow your own enthusiasm while furthering your career.

For more articles about avoiding burnout and developing your career, check out the Health & Wellness section of the Strategies for Nurse Managers Reading Room!

Rock Your Health: Why Am I So Sleepy?

Just back from a relaxing weekend and about ready to put your head down on the desk and take a nap? Even this morning in Jazzercise, the person next to me said she was exhausted when she thought she would return all rested and energized. Right now I feel very tired myself, so I’m going to take a closer look at why I am so sleepy. I’ve found three good reasons, so read on and find out what they are.

Blood Sugar Effects

I remember eating a lot of hot dogs with white buns, chips, ice cream – all high glycemic carbs that enter your bloodstream fast and then crash your blood sugar just as fast. (Thank goodness I don’t eat like that all the time!) That leads to a groggy crashing feeling and if you eat like that all weekend, you can bet you will feel pretty sleepy. Did you eat like this over the weekend?

Hormone Effects

Once again, those high glycemic carbs are the culprit. They activate your brain to produce serotonin, a chemical that allows for calm and pleasant moods, while making tryptophan, the chemical responsible for sleepiness, more available to your brain. This is another reason high carb meals make you sleepy, says the National Sleep Foundation. So now you get a double whammy from eating all that junk food!

Overeating Effects

Overeating is one of the most common causes of sleepiness. After eating, your body routes more blood to your digestive system. Meals excessive in size require even more blood, which causes temporary deprivation of blood and nutrients in your brain and residual grogginess.

So that’s what caused me to be sleepy all the time! What about you?

Need some support around this issue? Email me and we can talk.

Rock Your Health: Lesson Learned When I Decluttered One Shelf

It’s time to lighten your load and start living clutter free!

  • You can avoid the clutter and stress out all you want, but nothing will change until you take action.
  • You can make a commitment to another person, so you will have to keep your word.
  • You can declutter efficiently and in less time by using the timer on your cell phone to keep you moving.
  • You can add energetic music to the process so if feels like fun; if you can trick yourself into feeling like you are having fun, you’ll feel like the best organizer in the world!
  • The best thing for me is admiring my work and wanting to keep that shelf looking this way every day. And now on to the next challenge – my desk!

 

What have you learned when you cleaned your office? Want some support with this issue? I’m an expert on clutter and can coach you thru this process. Email me and let’s talk!