RSSAuthor Archive for Michael Briddon

Michael Briddon

Mike is the executive editor of the nursing, accreditation, and patient safety markets at HCPro, Inc. He's a former sportswriter and a passionate Syracuse basketball fan.

Create positive energy when speaking with your manager

We have all been in the situation where we are talking with a manager or supervisor about something and what we hear are all the reasons our idea won’t work.

We may hear:

“Oh, we tried that here a couple of years ago and that’s just not going to happen here.”

or

“Oh, yes, I think that’ a great idea, but that’s just not going to work here.”

or

“Do you remember so-and-so? He tried that here and he doesn’t work here anymore.”

When we walk away from the conversation, we feel defeated. We feel shot down. We need to think about how we can respond to the negative energy. [more]

Nurse reflects on Haiti medical mission trip

Along with sorting through the emotions and memories from her medical mission trip to Haiti, Bonnie Clair, MSN, RN, had another tall task: She had to sort through the pictures. “I took about 400,” she says. “I took pictures of Haiti and the Haitian people as well as the people I went with. I didn’t want to forget anyone.”

Clair, the retention project manager at Cox Health in Springfield, MO, went on a medical mission trip to Haiti for a week in March. It was seven days she’ll never forget. After a few weeks of letting the experience sink in, she candidly shared her thoughts, images, and memories with us. Her story, in three parts, will appear on our site Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Here are links to Part I and Part II. And here’s Part III, the aftermath:

[more]

A report on nursing and the economy

This week, we released a report on the state of nursing in the current economy on StrategiesforNurseManagers.com. Our newest benchmarking report is available to subscribers here. The results from the survey, conducted in April, reveal the thoughts and opinions of 163 nursing professionals from across the country. The survey included questions on a variety of topics, including staff morale, cost-cutting measures, retirement, staffing levels, stress, quality of care and the perceived future.

Here are some of the highlights:

  • More than 90% of the respondents said the economy was affecting their organization
  • [more]

Nurse provides care—and hope—in Haiti

The numbers are staggering. In the span of a week, Bonnie Clair, MSN, RN, and a group of 25 other healthcare professionals saw 2,196 patients and gave out 6,500 prescriptions. “Yes, we were very busy,” she says.

Clair, the retention project manager at Cox Health in Springfield, MO, went on a medical mission trip to Haiti for a week in March. It was seven days she’ll never forget. After a few weeks of letting the experience sink in, she candidly shared her thoughts, images, and memories with us. Her story, in three parts, will appear on our site this week. Find Part I here. Here’s Part II, the trip:

What did you miss most about being away from home?
You miss your family. I know. It sounds so cliché.

[more]

Haiti trip adds perspective for nurse

When she thinks back to Haiti, there’s one image that always creeps into Bonnie Clair’s mind. “There was a little boy who had a dirty pair of shorts on,” she says. “I saw him in his bare feet on the barren ground with animal droppings everywhere and I just stood there and cried. That one image stands out in my mind because it shouldn’t be like that.” [more]

Can Twitter improve healthcare communication?

Twitter, the social network based around the phrase “What are you doing right now?”, continues to gain popularity in world of healthcare.  But can it help improve communication with patients’ families?

Children’s Medical Center in Dallas thinks so.

The latest facility to “tweet” during surgery (a concept created in February by Henry Ford Health System), Children’s sees the technology as a way to help communication between physicians and families.

Read more about the idea here.

Join an online journal club

Starting a journal club is a great way to read articles that will help update practice. Journal clubs consist of groups of nurses who meet regularly to discuss and critique research articles appearing in scientific journals. Creating one is a good way to get started in evidence-based nursing practice.

An alternative to forming a journal club at your facility is to join an online club that is already established. Some nursing associations and nursing journals offer journal clubs in which a journal article—whether published in that journal or not—is critiqued. [more]

Ten lucky nurses win best-selling book from HCPro

As part of our Nurses Week celebration, HCPro, Inc. included a quiz about Florence Nightingale in its nursing e-newsletters. We asked you to send us the answers. The reward for a perfect score? A chance to win a copy of the best-selling Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility: Why Nurses Eat Their Young And Each Other.
[more]

Ask effective questions to ensure meetings are productive

In a meeting, you want participants to process information in a useful way that adds value. Each person in the room is running on a processing question. They are asking themselves a question and continually answering it. By setting that question for them, you can make the meeting much more productive. [more]

Recommendations to fight fatigue

Last week, we provided two posts to help you analyze fatigue among your nurses. The first one talked about collecting the data and the second one discussed how to analyze the data. Today, with help from Fight Fatigue: A Nurse Manager’s Guide to Reduce Risk and Revitalize Staff, we’re presenting some recommendations to help you solve sluggishness. [more]