September 06, 2017 | | Comments 0
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Relationship of Nursing Excellence to Evidence Based-Practice

For many years, the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program® (MRP) has been synonymous with environments in which nurses prefer to practice and patients achieve the best outcomes. Nurses that are retained in a Magnet-accredited hospital are involved directly in making choices on patient care, and they are active in contributing to healthcare changes based on EBP. “A growing body of research indicates that Magnet hospitals have higher percentages of satisfied RNs, lower RN turnover and vacancy, improved clinical outcomes, excellent nurse autonomy and decision-making capabilities, and improved patient satisfaction” (Drenkard, 2010, p. 264). Brown (2009) wrote, “Evidence-based practice (EBP) is recognized by the healthcare community as the gold standard for providing safe and compassionate care. It is an essential component of any organization having achieved MRP status.”

You can think about this information when you address the need for EBP support at your facility. EBP’s central importance to nursing excellence and its flagship status at any organization deemed worthy of MRP designation indicates that EBP support should move out of the category of “nice to have” and into the category of “need to have.”

Recognizing quality patient care, nursing excellence, and innovations in professional nursing practice, the MRP program provides consumers with the ultimate benchmark to measure the quality of care they can expect to receive. When U.S. News & World Report published its annual showcase of America’s Best Hospitals, designation as an MRP facility contributed to the total score for quality of inpatient care. In 2013, 15 of the 18 medical centers on the exclusive U.S. News Best Hospitals in America Honor Roll, and all 10 of the U.S. News Best Children’s Hospital Honor Roll, are ANCC Magnet-recognized organizations (ANCC, 2014).

MRP designation is based on quality indicators and standards of nursing practice as defined by the American Nurses Association’s Scope and Standards for Nurse Administrators (2009). The Scope and Standards for Nurse Administrators and other foundational documents form the base upon which the MRP environment is built. The designation process includes the appraisal of qualitative factors in nursing, and these factors, referred to as the 14 Forces of Magnetism, were first identified through research conducted in 1983. The 14 Forces were reconfigured under 5 Model Components in 2008, which places a greater focus on measuring outcomes.

The full expression of MRP designation embodies a professional environment guided by a strong visionary nursing leader who advocates and supports development and excellence in nursing practice. As a natural outcome of this, the program elevates the reputation and standards of the nursing profession.

Source: Evidence-Based Practice Made Simple

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Filed Under: Career developmentEvidence-based practice

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About the Author: Kenneth Michek is the Associate Editor for nurse management at HCPro.

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