July 05, 2017 | | Comments 0
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Challenges and Opportunities for Nurse Leaders

Looking forward, the difficulties we face include overcoming the bias that nurses are not prepared to lead, especially in interprofessional teams. This is a perception that nursing itself must change, first in the arena of self-image and then in the eyes of other powerful professional groups. If other clinical partners do not see the nurse as pivotal for ushering in change, then they are likely to use that bias to slow the rate or pace of change considerably.

For nurses to see themselves as capable of transforming healthcare, they must see themselves as equal partners at the table, able to negotiate and recommend, influence, and activate change initiatives at the local level and beyond. For some, this is an unimaginable role, but fortunately for others, this is a logical next step in fulfilling the promise of their education and preparation to lead. Stevens (2013) reminds us that there are four skills that the nurse leader must bring to this interprofessional table:

  • The redesign of healthcare systems through creativity and mastery of teamwork
  • Persistence in ensuring the education of nursing’s future workforce, with an eye focused on improving our systems of care
  • Moving beyond our current and comfortable programs of research, and learning to engage systems so that applications to larger platforms are possible
  • Inviting and ensuring multiple voices and perspectives are heard so that the transformation of healthcare is broadly focused on the needs of the larger population

It is our work not only to care for patients and to work diligently to improve the efficiencies and effectiveness of the system where we practice, but also to touch the lives of patients around the world by engaging in a readiness to move evidence-based practices into the mainstream of our thinking and our actions. To embrace change and actively implement those strategies which are best for patient outcomes will keep us focused firmly on the future and prevent us from being stuck in our past.

Source: Critical Thinking: Tools for Clinical Excellence and Leadership Effectiveness

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About the Author: Kenneth Michek is the Associate Editor for nurse management at HCPro.

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