RSSArchive for May, 2017

FREE Webinar: Fostering Nurse Engagement

Join Adirondack Health’s Chief Nursing Officer, Linda McClarigan, MSHA, BSN, RN, NE-BC, as she explains how the shared governance model has greatly benefited their work environment, in addition to lessons learned, best practices, and innovative projects that can help foster nurse engagement.nurse image

Participants of this webcast will discover:

  • Best practices for assessing your current work environment
  • Methods to encourage C-suite participation in nursing engagement programs

Innovative projects focused on sustaining productivity and a positive work environment.

Save your seat now!

Florence Nightingale, the original Nurse Leader

Nurses’ Week celebrates nurse contributions around the world, but it is also in celebration of Florence Nightingale’s birthday. Below is an excerpt from Nursing Professional Development: A Practical Guide for Evidence-Based Education about Nightingale’s influence on the nursing profession.

Florence Nightingale was an innovator truly far ahead of her time. Born in 1820 to a wealthy British family, she was raised in a privileged atmosphere and received a more thorough education than was typically given to girls of that era. However, Nightingale’s determination to pursue nursing as a career was, in the eyes of her family, an appalling idea (Carroll, 1992).

In the mid-19th century, women who called themselves nurses were usually uneducated and, for the most part, looking for an easy way to earn some money that often included stealing from those who were their patients. Nightingale obtained what minimal education was available at that time and, in 1853, assumed her first role as a nurse in London as the superintendent of the Institution for the Care of Sick Gentlewomen. Within a year of assuming this position, she was approached by the British Secretary of War to take command of a group of women who were going to Scutari in Turkey to care for sick and wounded soldiers serving in the Crimean War (Carroll, 1992).

As a result of her interventions, the morbidity and mortality rate of the soldiers in her care improved. She was a brilliant statistician who gathered and analyzed data to conduct what is arguably the first significant nursing research. Nightingale used her findings to teach the nurses under her supervision how to provide better care for patients and how to measure success based on patient outcomes. After returning home to England after the war, Nightingale used what she had learned through her research to establish hospital-based training schools for nurses. These schools had both education and moral standards that helped to enhance the reputation of nursing as well as those women who fulfilled the role of nurse…

Throughout her life, Nightingale continued to observe, gather data, and analyze findings to improve the education and training of nurses. Her innovations were implemented throughout the British Empire and, in conjunction with the work of nurse leaders in America, in the United States. Basic standards of rest, cleanliness, nutrition, and environmental comfort implemented first in wartime and then in civilian healthcare settings, remain the foundation of healthcare to this day.

Happy Nurses Week!

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American Nurses Association express dissapointment with American Health Care Act

Yesterday, the House of Representatives narrowly passed the American Health Care Act, which is aimed to undo much of the bulk of the legislation of the Affordable Care Act. The American Nurses Association expressed disappointment with its passage. releasing the following statement:

The American Nurses Association (ANA) strongly opposed the American Health Care Act (AHCA) and is deeply disappointed with the passage of this legislation by the United States House of Representatives. 

ANA, which represents the interests of more than 3.6 million registered nurses, has expressed serious concerns throughout negotiations about the critical impact the AHCA would have on the 24 million people who stand to lose insurance coverage if the bill becomes law.

“Over the past several weeks, nurses from across the country expressed their strong disapproval of this bill which would negatively impact the health of the nation,” said ANA President Pamela F. Cipriano, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN. “Today, Congress not only ignored the voice of the nation’s most honest and ethical profession and largest group of health care professionals, it also ignored the almost 15 million people in the United States with pre-existing conditions who will now have no protection from insurer discrimination.”

As it is currently written, the AHCA would cut Medicaid funding by $880 billion over 10 years, dramatically increase premiums on seniors, restrict millions of women from access to health care, weaken the sustainability of Medicare, and repeal income-based subsidies that have made it possible for millions of families to buy health insurance. In addition, states would have the option to waive essential health benefit protections that prevent insurance companies from charging individuals with pre-existing conditions significantly more for coverage. Even worse, insurers could decline coverage for substance abuse treatment, maternity care, and preventive services. Late efforts to stabilize the bill’s risk pools for more than 15 million people with pre-existing conditions were wholly inadequate and will leave the nation’s sickest vulnerable.

As this legislation moves to the United States Senate, ANA urges the Senate to allow for opportunities for thoughtful, public feedback in the face of reforms that would have such a far-reaching and personal impact across the nation.

ANA asks the Senate to oppose AHCA in its current form, and stands ready to work with Senators to protect and improve health care access, quality and affordability for all.

Nurse takes on the role of Surgeon General

Rear Adm. Sylvia Trent-Adams, a registered nurse, becomes one of the first nurses to serve as Attorney General.

Surgeon General Vivek H. Murthy was replaced on Friday by his deputy, Rear Adm. Sylvia Trent-Adams. Serving on an interim basis, Admiral Trent-Adams becomes the second nurse to have served in this position, and the first non-physician to take the job.

Admiral Trent-Adams worked as a nurse officer in the Army, and served as a research nurse at the University of Maryland, where she received her PhD. In 1992, she joined the Commissioned Corps of the Public Health Service, where she served in the HIV/AIDS bureau of the Health Resources and Services Administration before joining the surgeon general’s office.

Surgeons general have limited staff and direct influence, but they often use their position to call attention to important public health priorities. Dr. Murthy, Adm. Trent-Adams predecessor, used his platform to speak out against gun violence, labeling it as a threat to public health. It is unclear why Murthy was relieved of duty; the Department of Health and Human Services said that the Trump administration asked him to step down after “assisting in a smooth transition,” but Dr. Murthy’s wife, Alice Chen, said that her husband was fired after he refused to resign.