RSSArchive for March, 2017

AAPA Preceptor Conference

AAPA city

2017 Preceptor Conference

April 27-28, 2017 | Miami, Florida

Pre-conference: April 26, 2017

The 2017 Preceptor Conference features two days of education and training taught by the industry’s leading preceptor experts. During the event, attendees will learn actionable strategies for building preceptor programs in their healthcare facility and learning how to advance preceptor specialty practice among their experienced preceptors. Arrive a day early and participate in a preceptor training program designed specifically for faculty and clinical instructors.

The 2017 Preceptor Conference is designed for preceptors, nurses, nurse leaders, advanced practice providers, educators, professional and staff development specialists, and students. Network with leaders and preceptors to explore meaningful recognition and specialty certification through nationally accepted standards of practice and performance inherent in preceptor specialty practice. Learn how to positively meet the many complexities and challenges preceptors encounter within academia, clinical settings, and the workplace.

Topics:

  • Advancement of Preceptor Specialists
  • Scope and standards of preceptor specialty practice
  • Preceptor Specialist portfolio building
  • Review preceptor-based scenarios and discussions with simulation educators in the Preceptor Simulation Lab

Who should attend?

  • Nurses
  • Preceptors
  • Certified Preceptor Specialists
  • Advanced Practice Providers
  • Nurse Leaders
  • Educators
  • Professional and Staff Development Specialists
  • Nursing and Healthcare Students

For more information, visit www.preceptoracademy.com.

HCPro Spring Sale!

We’re celebrating spring with a #spring sale! Add to your nursing library and save 35% off your book purchase through the end of March.

17499467_1170682139727532_463237517817187240_n

Consider how personal bias affects peer review

Human nature contributes to bias by allowing us to use psychological “shortcuts” to reduce complexity and ambiguity in the world. We all wish that life were simpler, and our brains try to accommodate this wish by finding shortcuts to decisions by relying on past patterns of thinking. This enables us to provide a rational response within the context of a simpler and less-threatening world. The two main types of bias related to human nature are personal bias and group bias.

Personal bias has two aspects: emotion and thought. These biases come from our view of the world that is created by the sum of our individual experiences: where we grew up, our parents’ values, how our friends act, and how we were trained. Although we might make conscious efforts to overcome personal bias, we all retain some degree of it as part of our individuality.

Personal bias is more likely to affect peer review when individuals are not accountable for their decisions. This is not because these are bad people—they are simply good people in a flawed system. The case studies in this book provide several examples of peer review structures and procedures that, prior to redesign, increased the likelihood of personal bias, such as having a department chair conduct the entire case review process from case screening to decision. To reduce personal bias in peer review, consider requiring reviewers to provide a written rationale for their findings (even on care-appropriate cases), having a committee make the final decision on all cases, and implementing clear conflict of interest practices.

Group bias occurs when a group of individuals has a shared set of beliefs or experiences that result in a relatively predictable way of thinking or responding. This concept of “groupthink” results in the group tending to accept information that meets its common paradigm and reject, or at least not consider, information that doesn’t fit within it.

Lack of diversity in a group can create this bias. Therefore, to avoid group bias, structure the group to ensure that other views are included. There are two types of group bias that tend to affect peer review: professional bias (e.g., physicians think differently than nurses) and specialty bias (e.g., surgeons think differently than internists). One of the main reasons that medical staffs implement some form of multi-specialty peer review committees is that such committees reduce the likelihood of groupthink by bringing all perspectives to the table.

Source: Peer Review Benchmarking

Blogging can be an innovative tool for nursing educational sharing

With the time-crunch worse than ever, it can be difficult to find the time to keep up with the latest in your facility, let alone the wider world of nursing. Early research conducted by Critical Care Nurse (CCN) suggests that blogs can be an effective means of communicating the latest hospital policies and best practices.

The cardiac intensive care unit at Brigham and Women’s hospital found that while many of their nurses attended professional educational opportunities, the staff had difficulty sharing information with the entire nurse staff. The staff simply did not have the time for peer-to-peer sharing of educational information. To facilitate educational sharing, the nursing practice council at the facility set up a simple private blog where staff could share what they’ve learned from various educational opportunities, such as professional conferences and panels.

After fifteen months, the hospital conducted a survey to measure the effectiveness of this approach. They found that 86% of their nurses thought the blog was an effective way to share professional education, 81% felt the blog kept them up-to-date on evidence-based practices, and 59% thought the blog led to changes in their practices. While the results are anecdotal and early, the authors of the study suggest that more rigorous research is required.

Does your facility use blogging tools or social media for education and professional development?

How evidence-based practice can improve nurse satisfaction

If a nurse is unsatisfied with their career or feeling burnt out on nursing, taking an evidence-based approach can help them rediscover their passion for nursing. Robert Hess Jr., PhD, RN, FAAN and co-author of HCPro’s Shared Governance book, recently wrote a piece about EBP and nursing careers; here are some ways to apply EBP in your career:

  • Update your practices. Nursing is changing all of the time! If you feel like you’re stuck doing the same thing every day for years, you’re probably not using the most up-to-date practices. Nurse scientists and researchers are studying and updating practices for nurse specialties all of the time, and these changes can benefit patients and nurses alike. Try joining your specialty group’s professional organizations, attend professional events, and subscribe to specialty journals to keep abreast of the latest practices in nursing. Changing up your routine and increasing your engagement can bring the excitement back to your career!
  • Use EBP in your career. Evidence-based research is not just conducted on healthcare practices. There is organizational research that provides indicators for when nurses should consider a career change, such as switching roles, going back to school, or even leaving their current job. Burnout has been measured for decades, and evaluating your own signs of job fatigue can be instructive for potential career decisions. Nursing has a plethora of opportunities outside of the hospital bedroom, and feeling burnout could be your signal to explore them.
  • Evaluate your environment. Research has found the workplace satisfaction can correlate with career satisfaction. Observe your colleagues; do they seem happy? Do they participate in work group activities, both at work and outside of work? Having coworkers that are satisfied with their jobs has a positive impact on your own satisfaction, and if you’re feeling career fatigue, sometimes your coworkers can fuel your enthusiasm.

For more tips about career satisfaction and burnout, check out these articles from the Strategies for Nurse Managers’ Reading Room:

Delegation prevents nurse manager burnout

RN satisfaction survey promotes positive change


How nurse executives can help tired nurses