RSSArchive for August, 2016

End of summer nursing roundup

Nurses are finding new and innovative ways to help those in need around the world, but not every nurse can live up to that standard. Here are some of the best and worst stories in nursing this summer.

The Good:

University of Victoria researcher Kelli Stajduhar, a palliative care nurse, is leading the charge on healthcare for the homeless in her community. Because of the many barriers for homeless people to get healthcare, Stajduhar wants to go to them and provide healthcare where they are: downtown, in shelters, or in a housing complex. She thinks that outreach can improve the lives of the homeless, and get them the care they need. (Source: CBC)
Another nurse is looking for new ways to help the most vulnerable: Dawn Bounds, a nursing professor at Rush University College of Nursing, has published her extensive research on sex trafficking in the U.S. This research has the potential to save lives of at-risk young girls, and Bounds is planning to use this research to implement a runaway intervention program in Chicago. (Source: Nurse.com)

The Bad:
A New Jersey nurse broke the cardinal rule of healthcare when she was caught on video stabbing a disabled child with a needle six times. The nurse used physical abuse to control the autistic boy’s behavior, threatening him with the needle and other physical violence according to reports. (Source: The AP)
Nursing is often considered the most trustworthy profession, but this story might undermine that reputation. A nurse manager at St. Richard’s Hospital in the UK pled guilty to the theft of a dying man’s watch. The man’s Submariner Rolex was a family heirloom, and the nurse manager plead guilty to the stealing the watch after them man was admitted to the ED after suffering a heart attack.  (Source: The Argus)

Rock Your Health: Stop Muttering and Start Decluttering – Try A 12 Step Approach

If you are CREATIVE like me, clutter stays cluttered and causes muttering about the clutter, but it never gets decluttered!

So what’s that all about? For me, cluttering results from being blessed – or cursed – with being a person who is VISUAL. You need to have everything in view so you can find it. OUT OF SIGHT AND OUT OF MIND is your motto. Can you relate? So how do you manage that?

Let’s apply this issue to a 12 Step Program, of which I am very familiar and has helped me greatly in the past with issues out of my control.

  1. Admit you are powerless over clutter, it has become a barrier to managing your life and business successfully and causes you a great deal of unnecessary stress.
  2. Believe that a force greater than you can bring clutter under control if you just turn it over to the clutter gods for support.
  3. Make a commitment to getting regular decluttering done by committing it to your calendar.
  4. Search within yourself to discover why cluttering is happening in the first place and address that.
  5. Admit to yourself and others that just because it appears to be a problem, it is actually related to what kind of person you are and reflects the nature of a creative mind.
  6. Be willing to admit to yourself and others that just because you have the gift of creativity doesn’t mean you can’t control the clutter in your life.
  7. Ask the clutter gods of the universe to support your efforts in managing the clutter in a positive way.
  8. Make a list of all the people and projects you have disappointed because of you were less organized and efficient due to excess clutter.
  9. Share those truths with those affected and make amends.
  10. Continue to monitor your clutter daily and course correct promptly to avoid becoming paralyzed.
  11. Set your intention daily, using visualization on what it looks and feels like to live a clutter-free lifestyle.
  12. Share the message and lessons learned with others challenged by this issue.

Now you don’t have to do all of these steps right away. This is a major lifestyle change that thrives on doing one step at a time and moving on when you start seeing and “feeling” results.

Need some coaching support around this issue? Contact me for a laser coaching session.

Rock Your Health: Network or Die!

Are you contemplating having your own business? Check this out!

Did you know that “people need people” and in some cases when people don’t have human contact they can die? Newborns denied physical contact with other humans can actually die from this lack of contact, even when provided with proper nutrition and shelter. Older people who lack social contacts may be at increased risk of death if acute symptoms develop, because there is less of a network of confidantes to prompt medical attention.

Working for yourself is certainly different than having a job working for a boss and being around lots of people all day. There are always opportunities to make connections, be seen and known, and create new opportunities. But when you work for yourself, it is up to you to make those connections happen.

I’m just giving you a reality check in case you are about to embark on starting a business of your own and want to find out how to grow your business and avoid the “kiss of death” that happens to 50% of new businesses.

NETWORKING rules as a business builder and here’s why:

N – new connections are made with new people who may need your services
E – enjoyment happens when you learn about people’s hopes and dreams
T – trust develops when you connect with people on a regular basis
W – wonderful conversations often lead to friendships
O – opportunities arise to find even more people whom you can serve
R – rewards come from being able to help someone improve their life
K – kindred spirits show up the more people you meet
I – intimate conversations can lead to deeper relationships
N – notice what happens when you give the gift of listening to another person
G – great things occur when great people get together

So if you are going into business for yourself, networking with people on a regular basis is critical – but pays off with great rewards. What are your thoughts about this issue?

Rock Your Health: How to get what you want every time you ask

I know – that doesn’t sound possible. But how would you like to raise your odds of success?

Have you ever wanted something to happen to improve your life and it just wasn’t happening? No matter how hard you tried? Maybe you were trying too hard and need to slack off a bit. Sometimes we block our desires by pushing too hard and then get frustrated thinking “Why aren’t I getting anywhere? I’m working as hard as I can and getting nowhere.”

Here’s an example. I was teaching a class for teachers on how to bring positivity into the classroom using the Law of Attraction and suddenly realized that as much as I know about all the ways in the world to attract great things to my life, I still don’t always practice them. This class became a reminder of that, so I’d like to share with you five tips to help you do less, feel better and attract more.

Here are some tips to get you started.

  • First decide what desire you want to manifest for yourself
  • Create a Vision Board that represents what your desire looks like and display it where you see it every day
  • Schedule time every day to focus on your desire in a relaxed state
  • Practice techniques you enjoy daily that relax you like meditation, yoga, Tai Chi, exercise, listening to relaxing music, etc.
  • Keep a journal of all the things you start manifesting as proof that it works

Now you will be on your way to getting what you want (almost) every time you ask. I would love to hear your comments about this.

Book Excerpt: Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility

Years ago, at a National League of Nursing meeting, Loretta Nowakowski, former director for Health Education for the Public at Georgetown University School of Nursing in Washington, D.C., proposed that disease could be best understood by looking at hurricanes. She noted that, like a serious illness, hurricanes occurred only when many factors were present within relatively narrow parameters and that an appropriate intervention could alter the severity or course of a disease or hurricane. This discovery was encouraging to Nowakowski—it meant that an intervention, made at any point, could alter the final outcome.

And so it is with horizontal hostility. History, gender, education, work practices, interpersonal relationships, communication skills, and organizational structure all contribute to horizontal hostility. The “hurricane” of horizontal hostility cannot manifest without these predisposing factors, so to intervene anywhere in this vast array can change the outcome from hostile to healthy.

The good news is that no matter what our current role—whether CNO, staff nurse, director, educator, or manager—we can implement interventions that will decrease hostility. Multiple opportunities are available at various levels.

Framework for leading organizational change to eliminate hostility

Enacting a twofold method (i.e., increasing a healthy environment while simultaneously decreasing hostility) is the most effective approach that managers can take to enact change at the organizational level.

To increase a healthy culture, leaders must:

  • Firmly establish board and senior leadership team commitment
  • Make harm visible: Frame disruptive behavior as a safety issue; importance of teams:

       – Create infrastructures to support managers and staff: Include behaviors in annual reviews for all staff including physicians

  • Shift the power structure from a hierarchy to a team/tribe:

       – Provide a constructive feedback system for accountability and performance

       – Provide leadership training and confrontation skills training for managers

       – Provide assertiveness training and confrontation skills training for managers

       – Monitor the organizational climate

       – Increase social capital—build a strong informal network

 To decrease hostility, leaders must:

 Adopt a zero-tolerance policy for all disruptive behavior:

  • Same rules for all roles!
  • Transform power from a hierarchy to a tribe/team
  • Adopt a zero-tolerance policy for horizontal hostility
  • Provide leadership and conflict management training for managers
  • Educate staff about the etiology and impact of hostility
  • Create a system for reporting and monitoring the culture
  • Participate with other hospitals to pass state legislation

– See more at: http://www.psqh.com/analysis/leadership-ending-nurse-to-nurse-hostility-1/

- For more information or to order, visit the HCPro Marketplace.

Rock Your Health: Need some spirit boosters to break free from the routine of work?

  • Turn OFF negative chatter on the news – it feeds into a “down feeling.”
  • Turn ON great music and read, relax, dance – whatever the music moves you to do.
  • Register for an online course or a webinar that is educational, uplifting, and inspiring.
  • Start cleaning, one drawer at a time to reduce clutter and open up space.
  • Call friends to catch up – one or two a week is a good dose.
  • Create home cooked meals, sit around a table together and have great conversation.
  • Start dreaming and planning your next getaway.
  • Gather unwanted things – take to Goodwill and ponder how someone else will love having what you don’t need anymore.
  • Do a favor for someone without telling them and imagine how good it makes them feel!
  • When all else fails, write down 25 things you are grateful for. This works every time!