July 16, 2008 | | Comments 3
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Rev up your resume

by Phyllis Quinlan, RNC, MS, CLNC, CEN, CCRN

I am frequently asked about the best way to revise a resume. Many nurses find it challenging to identify and present their accomplishments. Here are some suggestions for getting started:

  • Begin to revise your resume today even if you are not planning a career move. This will allow you time to truly consider your strengths and accomplishments without the pressure of submitting something by a specific date.
  • If you have practiced in a clinical setting for many years, outline your abilities in a manner that shows some range. For example, instead of documenting 10 years of experience in pediatrics, consider stating your experience in terms of “neonate to seventeen.” This offers the reader more information about where you may fit into a potential position and is especially helpful when you are applying for a position outside of the traditional settings.
  • Develop the strongest generic resume you can and use a cover letter to outline your qualifications for a specific position.
  • Your cover letter can also help to clarify your experience. Recruiters in acute care may not fully realize that your long-term care (LTC) experience is relevant to what they are presently seeking. A few sentences discussing the co-morbidity and clinical complexity of your LTC residents drives home the point that your skill set is more evenly matched with acute care then they may have realized.
  • Be sure to present your experience in precepting new staff members, participating on committees, and unit-based special projects in the best light. If you have not been involved in these areas to date, get involved.
  • If you were is a position that was not a good fit for six months or less, there is no rule that states you must note it on your resume.

Revising your resume today also gives you the opportunity to identify any skills that you should develop in the future. Is it time to attend some computer classes and work on those PowerPoint and Excel skills? Has it been awhile since you attended any continuing education? Are you prepared to claim 10 years of experience in a specialty and answer questions about why you are not certified in that specialty? Act now. Be proactive. You will be amazed at how empowered you can feel.

What’s the first step you take when updating your resume?

For more information about professional life coaching email Phyllis Quinlan at mfwconsultants@mindspring.com.

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Filed Under: Career development

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About the Author: This post was compiled by members of the Strategies for Nurse Managers staff.

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  1. As a former Chief Nurse Executive, I am delighted to endorse the professional life coaching concept for nurses. Ms. Quinlan has done a remarkable job of advocating this. Her blogs have been most informative and motivating. Keep the informationflowing as nurses and the profession as a whole are being challenged and professional goals are being developed and changed. This could well be the shot in the arm that the profession needs at this time. Great job.

  2. I never thought of it that way. This was very helpful, it makes sense. I will use that format in my update.

  3. Awesome!! Some really good advice

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