January 03, 2008 | | Comments 0
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Don’t let Dr. Jekyll turn into Mr. Hyde

Is there a physician, possibly your medical director, who has been non-supportive behind your back?

You know who these people are. At a meeting or in front of your boss, they are supportive and, at times, encouraging of your work and efforts. But once the meeting is over and everyone goes their own way, they are completely different. You would think it was a “Jekyll and Hyde” experience!

This is not to take away from all the providers we collaborate with who are ethically strong and committed to being part of a team. This hot topic is not about them; we are grateful for strong collaboratives with many providers we work with.

But believe it or not, some people are unhappy when they see your successes. Now that I spurted that out, think about it. You already knew that, but most people won’t say it. You are that multi-tasking, confident, caring, empowering nurse leader and some folks out there want to burst your bubble.

How do they burst your bubble?

  • Going behind your back and planting seeds among those who look up to you. What are they planting seeds for? They are hoping to grow their own cheerleaders and take your squad away from you.
  • Relaying misinformation about what you said or wrote
  • Discouraging staff from following policy or procedure
  • Verbally defaming your ability to perform your role
  • Identifying staff members vulnerable to getting on their bandwagon

How would you approach this professional? Or, if you have already faced a situation similar to this one, how did it go?

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Shelley Cohen About the Author: Shelley Cohen, RN, MSN, CEN, is the owner of Health Resources Unlimited, a company she founded in 1997 to meet the ongoing professional development needs of nurse managers and emergency department nurses. With a passion for dealing with the realities of the challenges in healthcare delivery, she embraces a direct and humorous approach to problem solving, her consulting work, and training programs. As an author and national speaker, she brings more than 30 years of nursing experience to a platform that is relevant and timely. Her ability to maintain a current perspective of nursing issues is accomplished through her role as a prn staff nurse. As an advocate for children in foster care, Shelley and her husband, Dennis, operate a non-profit organization, DoubleCreek, at their home in Tennessee.

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