November 12, 2007 | | Comments 0
Print This Post
Email This Post

Your job is a job–not your life

by Pat Maguire, RN, MN, CNAA

It’s the time of year when everything has a tendency to get chaotic–either the budget year is ending and you are worried about your final numbers, or you are putting the final touches on next year’s financial plan and are concerned that your requests may not be approved. The newly licensed nurses are nearing the end of orientation and some feel they aren’t competent to fly solo. One of your expert nurses is contemplating a transfer to a critical care unit and someone who behaves like “poor pitiful Pearl” most of the time has been in your face one more time about her seniority and expectation that she will be off Christmas and New Year’s Eve and day.

You’ve only held your position for a year or two and the stress of the 24-hour accountability and responsibility is starting to take its toll. Where do you turn for support? How do you manage the daily conflicts that tend to pop up regardless of the effort you put into modeling collaboration and teamwork?

Several years ago, a wise colleague who’d seen it all helped me through a particularly tough time. She asked me if I knew what my trigger points were. What made me vulnerable to a self created “pity party?” What part of the chaos did I own? Was I willing to step up to the plate just as I expected my staff to? Wow, those are pretty intense questions, especially if you are willing and able to do some soul searching before you flip back into high gear and try to solve world hunger.

What was the last novel or mystery book you read? What about your friends and family, when did you do something fun with them? Have you had any “retail therapy” lately? How about professional publications–either clinically focused journals or management texts–do you have a favorite? There are so many that offer a world of insight about your team and more importantly, about you and your style. I have found three publications to be most useful:

  • Michael Henry Cohen’s What You Accept Is What You Teach
  • Jim Collin’s Good To Great
  • Carly Fiorina’s Tough Choices

I pick one up whenever I’m down and learn something new about myself each and every time.

Commit to lifelong learning. And at the end of every day, pause and think about the things you did that made a difference for your patients, your staff, and your colleagues. Keep a journal and for heaven sake, don’t be critical and say, “I didn’t do anything.” You and I both know that isn’t true. Above all, be true to yourself. Don’t compromise your values. Know who and what your resources are so you can seek them out whenever the need presents.

The bottom line is make time for yourself every week–both personally and professionally. And never forget, your position is intended to be your job–not your life.

Entry Information

Filed Under: Care for the caregiver

Tags:

About the Author: This post was compiled by members of the Strategies for Nurse Managers staff.

Sorry, comments for this entry are closed at this time.