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Nurses uniquely qualified for hospital design

The role of nurses has expanded greatly over the past few years, as nurses are moving from the bedside into all facets of healthcare. Hospitals have started to use nurses’ expertise to help design their facilities, with impressive results.

Hospital design can have a profound impact for both nurses and patients, but facilities are just starting to include nurses in the design process. Health Facilities Management (HFM) reports that involving nurses in design planning can help executives and contractors keep patient-care priorities in mind during construction. Seemingly small decisions, like the placement of sinks, computers, or wall outlets, can lead to an increase patient satisfaction. Nurses have been behind some of the pioneering new hospital designs, such as single-occupancy maternity rooms and the acuity-adaptable patient rooms. As one nurse told HFM, “Nurses spend the most time with the patient… we have a responsibility to be the voice of the patient, family and each other.”

Looking out for each other is another great reason for involving nurses in hospital design. A study published by Hassell and the University of Melbourne found that hospitals designed to accommodate nurses have a better chance of attracting and retaining nurse staff. The researchers identified a link between hospital workplace design and efficiency, health and safety for staff and patients, and staff morale. These factors play a significant role in staff retention, and who better to ensure a facility is attractive to nurses than nurse leaders?

Nurse-led design choices improve conditions for patients and nurses, but they can also help the bottom line. Nurses are involved in many different areas of the hospital, and their input can make operations more efficient and affordable. In one example reported by HFM, nurses saved the Parkland hospital project millions of dollars by eliminating unnecessary equipment and cabinetry in emergency rooms.

Both the survey and HFM article note that despite these benefits, nurses don’t always get a voice in hospital design. But as nurse-designed hospitals flourish, perhaps more facilities will involve nurses in design plans.

For more about Nursing and hospital design, check out: Take Five: How renewal rooms revive stressed out nurses

Rock Your Health: Gluten-Free for You and Me?

How much gluten are you consuming daily and it is affecting your health?  Just look around at work at how much is staring in your face daily.  Check out these facts.

G – “Gluten” refers to proteins that occur naturally in wheat, rye, barley and cross-bred hybrids of these grains

- Labels on foods using the claim “gluten-free” now must have a gluten limit of less than 20 ppm (parts per million)

- Until now, celiac patients did not know what the words ‘gluten free’ meant when they saw them on a food label

T – Three million people in the United States have Celiac Disease which is 1% of the population

- Eliminating Gluten from the diet is a big challenge for those with Celiac Disease

- Now the FDA has set guidelines for the use of the term “gluten-free” on food labels to help people with celiac disease maintain a gluten-free diet.

 

F – Foods that contain gluten trigger production of antibodies that attack and damage the lining of the small intestine which limits absorption of nutrients and leads to other serious health problems, including nutritional deficiencies, osteoporosis, growth retardation, infertility, miscarriages, short stature, and intestinal cancers.

- Removing Gluten from the diet is the only way to manage Celiac Disease

- Eliminating Gluten from the diet will also improve life for many others who are gluten intolerant or gluten sensitive.

E – Eliminating the following from food will allow food manufacturers to use the label “gluten-free”

  1. an ingredient that is any type of wheat, rye, barley, or crossbreeds of these grains
  2. an ingredient derived from these grains and that has not been processed to remove gluten
  3. an ingredient derived from these grains and that has been processed to remove gluten, if it results in the food containing 20 or more parts per million (ppm) gluten

Want more support around this issue on how to live a gluten-free lifestyle?  Email me at carol@carolebert.com

Women executives face more criticism than men

There are many hurdles for women pursuing executive roles. Normally a male-dominated field, many women struggle to get the opportunities and resources they need to obtain leadership and executive positions. Unfortunately, things don’t get much easier once they get there, according to a new study.

The Harvard Business Review published a study by the Yale School of Management that investigated gender stereotypes in executive evaluations. The study gave participants a scenario where a police chief misused resources and let a protest get out of hand. In one scenario, the police chief was male, in another the chief was female. The female chief received significantly more criticism than the male; some participants suggested that she get demoted, while none of the participants suggested that for the male chief. This pattern continued: “A decision that backfired led to harsher scrutiny for female leaders.”

The study concluded that women in positions that are traditionally occupied by men—which are often leadership roles, unfortunately—were criticized because they were going against gender stereotypes. For nurse leaders looking to transition to executive positions, this is yet another hurdle to overcome.

For more articles about women in health care, check out some of our articles in the Strategies for Nurse Managers Reading Room:

Women in healthcare want to find a healthy work-life balance

Nurses bring layers of diversity to hospital leadership

Rock Your Health: Are your joints starting to act up?

As the Nurse of Wellness that I am, my belief is that I am unstoppable and will live forever. Can you relate? But the mechanics of my body have a different story to tell. Over-use syndrome of doing too much, in too much of a hurry, and not honoring the fact that my body might need to slow down a bit to move safely and not get hurt  took its toll on my knee.

Yes, I was on crutches with a swollen left knee from just squatting down briefly.  Go figure! But I have learned from this experience. YES – ONCE AGAIN – another learning experience!!

  • I had to ask for help, even when it pains me to do so
  • I had to do less and the world didn’t end because I’m not scurrying about
  • I had more time than I thought and could catch up on reading and making calls to reconnect with others – you know; all that old-fashioned stuff we don’t always seem to have time to do.
  • I became more efficient with my movements because I had to rest my knee more often instead of being in perpetual motion
  • I received visitors who brought me great food and great conversation
  • I discovered how valuable friends are who will rally around me when I am down and out
  • And finally, I learned that my joints need more respect as I age so I don’t injure myself needlessly.

So as I healed with ice, elevation, powerful anti-oxidants, essential oils, relaxation, ibuprofen and crutch-walking, I realized we are all on this journey of aging so I hope you give your “joints” a chance to serve you to the best of their ability. Respect them and they will carry you through.

Be well on your journey!  Would love to hear your story about how nursing can be tough on your joints!  Email me at carol@carolebert.com

Kathleen Bartholomew’s “Lessons from Nursing to the World”

Enjoy this Ted Talk given by HCPro author Kathleen Bartholomew. Listen to Kathleen discuss the importance of dismantling the nursing hierarchy that can devalue and shame caregivers and creating an atmosphere of open communication and respect between caregivers which ultimately improves patient care.

 

Rock Your Health: 6 Daily habits you should definitely steal from history’s greatest “Creatives”

Are you exercising your “creative juices” as you move forward with your latest challenges? Did you know that being more creative makes life more fun and improves your health too!  Apparently famous creative people over history use “wellness strategies” to improve their creativity. Check it out!

Napping: Charles Darwin took a nap every day. Studies show that “sleeping on it” really does work. And while the idea of catching a few moments of rest midday may be perceived as lazy, it can actually be way better for productivity than trying to soldier through a particularly sleepy afternoon.

Wellness tip – I do something similar by taking 30 minutes to groove on my Chi Machine for relaxation. Not only do I get a great BUZZ when my Chi (energy) is flowing freely, but I often fall asleep as well!

*How often do you take time for a nap and what benefit do you receive when you do take one?

 

Being social: Lots of history’s greatest thinkers regularly visited and dined with their friends, which can help fend off the loneliness of being a creative entrepreneur.

Wellness tip – I am attracted to others with creative minds and when we are together we are “in the flow” where ideas come easily, they bounce back and forth and we have great fun. And feeling good doing what you love in the company of others like you is good for your heart and soul.

*How often do you tap into the creative juices of your naturally creative employees?

 

Exercising: Charles Darwin took 3 walks per day. Charles Dickens took “strenuous walks” through the countryside. Victor Hugo took long strenuous walks on the beach. Milton walked up and down his garden. Freud walked around Vienna at “terrific speed”.

Wellness tip – Exercise really kicks in my creative juices so I not only receive cardiac health benefits from my Jazzercise class and walking outside, but I also come up with even more ideas I can use. I often have to stop in mid-exercise to write down something brilliant I just thought of.

*What is your exercise routine and what creative thoughts occur when you are doing it?

 

Taking breaks: Giving themselves a chance to do something other than work in the middle of the day, whether it be a lunch with family or a quiet project, was popular with many of the greats. W.H. Auden did the crossword. Charles Darwin played backgammon with his wife.

Wellness tip – Breaks are hugely important for optimal health but I have to schedule them in or they don’t happen. We can work hard, but we need recovery time just like with exercise. So every 2 hours I stop and take a walk, have a cup of tea with a snack, or do a relaxation exercise.

*How often do you take breaks in your day – and make sure your employees do the same thing – to give the body/mind a chance to recover?

 

Decompressing at the end of the day: René Descartes and Charles Darwin both regularly allowed themselves time in bed at the end of every day to think about their day and come up with ideas, and, it’s safe to say, they didn’t do it with the TV on.

Wellness tip – I declare an end time every day or I will not stop working. The computer gets turned off and stays off, then off to exercise class followed by down-time eating and visiting with my husband to wind down for the day.

*What is your plan for decompressing from the day?

 

Sleep: Tchaikovsky, Hugo, Beethoven slept 8 hours each night, Dickens, Franklin, Darwin and Milton slept 7. And the majority prepared for sleep by winding down with reading, playing cards, conversation, listening to music, taking a bath.

Wellness tip – And today the old adage of sleeping 7-8 hours each night for rejuvenation still stands. I make sure the bedroom is dark, the windows are letting in fresh air and because I easily awaken to outside sounds I have a setting on my clock that creates the sounds of rain to block that out.

*What are your sleep rituals and how well are you doing with them?

 

Hopefully these “creative” ideas from past and present will be just what you need right now! And if you need a “Life Coach” who can help you sort it all out, contact me at carol@creatingwellnesscultures.com

Sample Chapter from Nursing Professional Development: A Practical Guide for Evidence-Based Education

sdms_265x265To continue our Nurses’ Week celebration, we are offering a free chapter from Nursing Professional Development: A Practical Guide for Evidence-Based Education. The chapter will help nurse educators and leaders engage with nurses of all levels of expertise, from new grads to veteran nurses.

To download the chapter, click here.

To purchase the book, visit the HCPro marketplace. Don’t forget to use the Nurses’ Week discount code NRSWK2016 for 20% off!

Continue reading for a preview of the chapter.
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Free on-demand webcast!

TODAY ONLY!

To celebrate Nurses’ Week, we are giving away our most recent nursing webcast for free! For more information and to download the webcast, continue reading below.

Nursing Peer Review in Action: Experienced Nurses Share Best Practices and Lessons Learned

YN120315_MKT_WebcastJoin Sarah Moody, DNP, RN, NEA-BC, and June Marshall, DNP, RN, NEA-BC, for a free 60-minute webcast on how incident-based nursing peer review benefits an organization and elevates nurse practice.

These experienced speakers clarify the difference between formal, incident-based nursing peer review and the type of review that involves peer evaluation of nurses’ performance. They demonstrate how incident-based nursing peer review can elevate quality and the professionalism of nursing through sharing case studies and lessons learned.

Moody and Marshall have many years of experience leading nursing peer review committees as incident-based nursing peer review is mandated by the Texas Nursing Practice Act.

At the conclusion of this program, you will be able to:

  1. Compare nursing peer review and peer evaluation of performance for appraisal purposes
  2. Identify practical strategies for organizational change related to practice incidents
  3. Describe nurses’ and nurse leaders’ respective roles in incident-based peer review
  4. Clarify the differences between peer review, quality management, and disciplinary actions (human resources)

Download the full webcast here.

 

Happy Nurses’ Week!

Happy Nurses Week from HCPro. This year’s theme is “Culture of Safety: It Starts with YOU!”

nurse's weekHCPro will be celebrating by offering exciting giveaways and promotions all week long.  Check on this blog throughout the week for exclusive offers and giveaways!

We’re kicking off the celebration with a 20% discount code you can use all week toward the purchase of any of our nursing products.  Use discount code NRSWK2016 to receive your discount in the HCPro Marketplace.

You can browse our selection of nursing resources here.

Keep an eye on your email (and this space) for a chance to register to win!

CMS adopts 2012 Life Safety Code®

Editor’s Note: This originally appeared in the OSHA Healthcare Advisor.

In a highly-anticipated move expected to significantly affect the regulatory rules that hospitals and other healthcare facilities are held to, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has officially adopted the 2012 edition of the Life Safety Code® (LSC).

CMS has confirmed that the final rule adopts updated provisions of the National Fire Protection Association’s (NFPA) 2012 edition of the LSC as well as provisions of the NFPA’s 2012 edition of the Health Care Facilities Code.

Healthcare providers affected by this rule must comply with all regulations by July 4—60 days from the publication date of the rule in the Federal Register.

The adoption of the rule has long been anticipated, as the LSC, which governs fire safety regulations in U.S. hospitals, is updated every three years, and CMS has not formally adopted a new update since 2003, when it adopted the 2000 edition. As a result, CMS surveyors have been holding healthcare facilities to different standards to other regulatory agencies that have gradually adopted provisions of the new LSC in their survey requirements.

Some of the main changes required under the final rule include:

  • Healthcare facilities located in buildings that are taller than 75 feet are required to install automatic sprinkler systems within 12 years. after the rule’s effective date.
  • Healthcare facilities are required to have a fire watch or building evacuation if their sprinkler systems is out of service for more than 10 hours.
  • The provisions offer long-term care facilities greater flexibility in what they can place in corridors. Currently, they cannot include benches or other seating areas because of fire code requirements limiting potential barriers to firefighters. Moving forward, LTC facilities will be able to include more home-like items such as fixed seating in the corridor for resting and certain decorations in patient rooms.
  • Fireplaces will be permitted in smoke compartments without a one-hour fire wall rating, which makes a facility more home-like for residents.
  • For ASCs, alcohol-based hand rub dispensers now may be placed in corridors to allow for easier access.

Visit https://s3.amazonaws.com/public-inspection.federalregister.gov/2016-10043.pdf to read the full final rule.

View the CMS press release here: https://www.cms.gov/Newsroom/MediaReleaseDatabase/Press-releases/2016-Press-releases-items/2016-05-03.html