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Rock Your Health: Seven ways to calm a busy boomer

I am a busy boomer. Always on the move and always doing more than I need to. I am an energizer bunny. It seems to be a trait of many fellow boomers that we don’t want to slow down.

What I have noticed, however, is I get so busy “doing” that I don’t take enough time “being.” And by doing all the time, I miss out on a lot of what is great about my age and wisdom and being a boomer. In an effort to correct that, I (sadly) have to schedule time on my calendar for relaxation and reflection, which is apparently what we have to do today to get any free time for ourselves. As crazy as that seems, it actually works and is a great tool if you are looking for a way to build time into your day for YOU!

So pull out your calendars and create some space for you every day where you can REFLECT on all that is great about your life and what lies ahead. Here are a few steps to follow.

R – Realize what is happening in the present moment

If you are caught-up rehashing something in the past or projecting into the future, you have totally missed what is happening in the present moment. And that is all we have! Take a breath, and pay attention to the right now time and what is in your mind. Is it what you want to be thinking about? Is it serving you well or making you stressed? Is it negative or positive? Right here, right now, think about something pleasant and stay with that thought, and your body and mind will thank you.

E – Escape from your current focus and take time out to think

Now that you have adjusted your thoughts toward positivity, stay there for a while and think of all the things you are grateful for. As you continue these thoughts, you might notice a smile creeping in on your face as you ponder what is great about you and your life. How good does that feel? [more]

Don’t Disclose: Peer review confidentiality guidelines download

confidential Recently, I posted an overview of the key confidentiality requirements for
members of the peer review committee. At long last, you can download a copy
of Don’t Disclose here, for the case review committee members in your organization.

Last week’s peer review webcast (presented by Laura Harrington and Marla Smith) was followed by a lively question and answer period. Topics ranged from the meaning of “timely” in terms of completing a review* to the virtues of including a section in your scoring that considers “contributing factors”** … and much more.

You can learn more about the on demand version of the webinar here and the presenters’ nursing peer review book here.

 

 

  * Answer: <90 days

** Answer: Be flexible. If you want to include special factors in scoring, it may help identify process issues to address proactively separate from the review

Pay equity: Who said it?

As a footnote to Rebecca’s post regarding Barton Quoteour reader poll focusing on pay equity between male and female nurses, I want
to share the following quote with you…

Without doing a Google search, can you identify the speaker? Add a comment if so…

Survey says male nurses are paid more than female nurses on your units

Recently, we posted a poll on www.StrategiesForNurseManagers.com and asked whether on your unit male nurses earn more than female nurses for the same role.

Seventy-three percent responded that they do. Only 24% said no, while 4% admitted they don’t know.

Click here to take the poll if you haven’t already done so.

Rock Your Health: Seven secrets to being a healthy Boomer

What does it mean to be a healthy Baby Boomer? I am one and am proud of it! But I latched on to the concept of Wellness early-on. Right out of nursing training I spent three years as a Navy Nurse caring for Vietnam casualties and really got a wake-up call about war and how it is not a good thing! But I learned a lot, grew up a lot, and then entered civilian life again doing the nursing thing at the bedside. That may have been the turning point for me because I felt the problems I was treating could have been prevented, and it all seemed senseless to me.

So I became a school nurse, got hooked on teaching kids how to stay healthy, and made the shift from treating problems to helping people prevent them. Much more rewarding for me and thus I was dubbed “Nurse Wellness.”

How to be happyWhat I have learned and “know for sure” (as Oprah would put it) is that there are some core principles that if you adhere to them, all will be well.  Why people don’t is still a mystery to me, but once you get in the groove of these things, it becomes fun, with a huge payoff—like you might live forever! And right now as a Boomer, that sounds mighty nice, doesn’t it?

So here is that magic formula for staying HEALTHY.

H – Happy attitude
E – Exercise daily
A – Abundance of antioxidants
L – Low glycemic foods
T – Take time for yourself
H – Help others
Y – Young at heart

So how healthy are you?

Be well on your wellness journey.

Reminder: Nursing Peer Review Webcast

Just a few more days left until our Nursing Peer Review webcast, NPR2cloud3afeaturing nursing peer review experts Laura Harrington, RN, BSN, MHA, CPHQ, CPCQM, and Marla Smith, MHSA. These authors of the HCPro book Nursing Peer Review, Second Edition: A Practical, Nonpunitive Approach to Case Review, will pack a 90-minute webcast with answers to these questions, and more:

How do you actually do nursing case review? How do you deal
with the outcomes? And how can you use case review to monitor performance and track and trend data? And what are the core requirements for confidentiality? (See below for Don’t Disclose,
a cheat sheet of guidelines, and look for a notice soon for download instructions.)

Developing a structure to support nursing case review is just the first step. Join us on Thursday, April 16, 2015 at 1–2:30 p.m. Eastern to explore the practical requirements of implementing this important process. To register, click here.

Don't Disclose-Peer Review

 

Nursing research: Understanding whistleblowing

Last week I promised a downloadable version of the whistle imagewhistleblower flowchart. For those who are interested, you can access the file here.

When I read about the fallout on Kim Cheely, the nurse whistle-
blower I wrote about last week, I had to ask myself:
Why do nurses risk their jobs to blow the whistle? Why speak out, when there is danger of ostracism, marginalization, and damage to one’s career? I did a bit more research on the subject, and ran across a thought-provoking study published “down under” a few years ago in the Journal of Advanced Nursing. You may find it interesting also.

Using a qualitative narrative inquiry design, the Understanding whistleblowing: Qualitative insights from nurse whistleblowers study looked into the reasons nurses decided to become whistleblowers, and gathered insights into nurses’ experiences of being whistleblowers. I doubt any nurses reading this will be surprised to learn the primary reason behind the decision to blow the whistle.

It’s simple, nurses are patient advocates. Of course there’s much more to the study, and it makes interesting reading for many reasons, not the least of which is that it used face-to-face data collection methods, and based queries on real experiences and not hypothetical scenarios.

In other words, the questions didn’t ask “what would you do” if you faced with wrongdoing. The subjects of this study had worked through the tough decisions and lived through actual whistleblowing events. You can access the report on this study here.

 

Rock Your Health: With Carol Ebert, RN, wellness specialist

Hello! I will be writing a weekly blog for YOU, the professional nurse leader in the second half of your career, anticipating what’s next and wanting to embrace a wellness lifestyle. I’m the perfect partner for you as you embark on this journey since I am already in the Boomer Retirement Zone myself. So let’s get acquainted!

I am not a nurse in the traditional sense—a patient care expert—though I did do that some. I am a nurse in the global sense, caring about the total health of the human condition: mind, body and spirit. Luckily, my nursing path led me to wellness, my true passion, where I spent the majority of my career. Even within my passion, however, I still found a need to reinvent myself regularly.

Why this desire to change? Born with a creative brain, I am often plagued with frustration when working in a structured and predictable environment. I can do it if I have to, but it is not my true nature, which I discovered once I reached adulthood when I could fully express who I was.

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Introducing a new weekly column!

Please join me in welcoming Carol Ebert, RN, to the StrategiesForNurseManagers.com and The Leaders’ Lounge blog community!

Carol is a health and wellness expert and devotes much of her time to helping nurses focus on their own health and wellness, as well as preparing for retirement and the later part of their careers.

Carol will pen the “Rock your health” column each Wednesday on The Leaders’ Lounge. Be sure to stop by and check out her latest helpful tips and advice!

The unofficial whistleblower flowchart for nurses

Last week, a whistleblower lawsuit was filed by Kim Cheely, a nurse manager at Georgia Regents Medical Center prior to being fired last October for “insubordination.” In this case, “insubordination” appears to mean that the trusted, 37-year veteran of GRMC dogged management to address quality-of-care concerns related to repeated staff reductions in the oncology and bone marrow transplant units.

The story in The Augusta Chronicle documents a situation where anything that could go wrong, did. Cheely took every logical step she could to affect change, and thought she would be protected from retaliation by invoking the hospital’s conflict resolution policy. This did not turn out well for Cheely, unfortunately. In fact, to be protected as a whistleblower, you must report to the state or national agency responsible for regulation of your employer.

For anyone considering blowing whistleblower flowchartthe whistle, take a look at the flowchart I created from advice offered on the ANA website. The chart, which illustrates just the bare bones, will be available for download later in the week, in case you want to share it with your colleagues.

On a related note: I’m currently reading draft chapters for an upcoming HCPro book, The Nurse Manager’s Legal Companion, by a wonderful nurse and attorney, Dinah Brothers. We’ll also have a handbook for staff nurses. Neither is available for preorder quite yet, but I’ll be sure to let you know when they are.