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Rock Your Health: Tips for being a great manager

What kind of manager are you? What do others say about you? Here’s a list of qualities that I like in a manager.

M - Meets employees where they are and accepts them.

A - Assesses their attitude daily and keeps a positive attitude.

N - Notices greatness and share with others.

A - Ask questions rather than giving advice.

G - Greets everyone they see with a smile.

E - Engages employees in the decision making process.

R - Recognizes achievements and celebrates regularly.

Incident Reports: What You Need to Know (Part Two)

Incidents reports are a pain to fill out, but vital for documenting what happened and for protecting yourself and your staff. This week, we’re republishing a popular post full of best practices, provided by Patricia A. Duclos-Miller, MS, RN, CNA, BC.

incident graphic2Yesterday we looked at the purpose of the incident report and the value of documenting facts as well as the patient’s responses to care in the nursing progress notes (see Incident Reports: Part One). Today we’ll look at eight risk reduction recommendations you should follow to limit the number of incidents you face. We’ll also give you a check list of tips for writing incident reports should adverse events occur. (I’ll make the checklist available as a PDF download in a few days, so check back for the link.)

RISK REDUCTION RECOMMENDATIONS FOR NURSE MANAGERS

  1. Be sure that everyone is clear as to who is managing the patient. This is especially critical in complicated cases with numerous consults. One of the major factors in adverse events is fragmentation or lack of clear communication between providers. Therefore, use the medical record as a communication tool for all providers and encourage your staff to read notes from other providers and disciplines.
  2. Be sure staff understand and utilize the chain of command when necessary. They are considered patient advocates and must speak on behalf of the patient to ensure quality patient care. Documentation of the chain of command process should be factual and blameless.
  3. Advise your staff never to create notes at home concerning the event. They should not discuss the event with other care providers without having someone from risk management present, unless the discussion is in a quality-review process or in the presence of the facility’s attorney.
  4. If an adverse event occurs, the staff must know that attention to patient needs is first and foremost. If a patient is injured, nursing and medical interventions take precedence over everything else.
  5. Follow the organization’s policy on medical-event disclosure. It is important that staff understand who is designated to inform the patient/family. Documentation should include who was present during the discussion, what information was discussed, and all of the patient/family responses.
  6. Ensure that the patient/family receives compassionate care and that everyone involved maintains a professional relationship.
  7. If an adverse event occurs, contact the risk manager. Discuss the case discretely, because conversations are not protected under a quality statute or attorney-client privilege, and therefore may be discoverable.
  8. Work with the risk manager. The risk manager can help you and your staff promote patient safety and proactive strategies to avoid injuries.

[more]

Incident Reports: What You Need to Know (Part One)

Incidents reports are a pain to fill out, but vital for documenting what happened and for protecting yourself and your staff. This week, we’re republishing installments of a popular post chock full of best practices, provided by Patricia A. Duclos-Miller, MS, RN, CNA, BC.

incident graphic2If you and your staff think that incident reports are more trouble than they’re worth, you could not be more wrong.

We work in high-stress, fast-paced environments. It is your responsibility as a member of the nursing management team to understand the importance of incident reports, to ensure that your staff completes them, and to investigate incidents to avoid any further occurrences. Your investigation will also provide possible defense if during your investigation you identify a system failure and take the necessary corrective action(s).

The purpose of the incident report is to refresh the memories of both the nurse manager/supervisor and the staff nurse. While the clinical record is patient-focused, the incident report is incident-focused. The benefit to you and your staff is [more]

Rock Your Health: How that killer job might be killing you

Nurse leaders, remember when you landed that great job you have now and it was fantastic? And then at some point, it stopped being fantastic and started turning on you? You may be in a really bad place and now you think your job is starting to kill you! Check out the warning signs:

Complaining more
* Frustrated with the bureaucracy
* Your values don’t match the business anymore

Hearing yourself say these words
* I wish things could be different
* I wish I could do that but work gets in the way [more]

FREE White Paper: Preceptor competencies

Enjoy a FREE white paper on preceptor competency assessment and verification!

This white paper is compiled from the third edition of the groundbreaking book, downloadicon3
The Preceptor Program Builder
,
written by Diana Swihart, PhD, DMin, MSN, APN CS, RN-BC, and Solimar Figueroa, MHA, MSN, BSN, RN. It discusses and defines the competencies developed in preceptorships, explores the goals and essential elements of competency assessment and verification, and takes a close look at the categories of competencies and methods for assessing and verifying them within the context of the preceptor relationship.

Click here to download the white paper: Preceptor competency assessment and verification.


The Preceptor Program Builder provides professional development staff the keys to creating a successful preceptor program in the healthcare environment. Learn more here.

Click here to view our full range of nursing resources.

Free tool: Build nursing team self-esteem

As promised in last week’s post, Try This: Build nursing team self-esteem, downloadicon2the exercise that Kathleen Bartholomew uses to encourage nurses’ self-esteem has been posted to our Tools Library.

To download the Hierarchy of Voice tool, click here.

 


Excerpted from Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility, Second Edition, by Kathleen Bartholomew

Evidence-Based Practice: Share your journey

Do you have an EBP story to share?

For nurses just getting started with evidence-based practice, the steps between deciding on an area to research and implementing a plan for improvement can be overwhelming. Identifying sources of qualified research, interpreting the results, translating procedures from theory to practice… It’s complicated, to say the least.

I’m looking for a few brave souls who would be willing to share what I’m calling “EBP notes from the field.” If you’ve gone through the process from start to finish, would you be willing to share ebpnotesyour story? I see these as 1-2 pages looking into the decision making process, the research you chose, the steps you took to get buy-in from management. What did you learn in the process? How did you implement your research? Have you been able to measure the results?

I’d like to include a few of these stories in an upcoming book project: a simple EBP guide for working professionals. It will be very practical, straightforward, and [more]

Rock Your Health: Five steps to de-clutter your workspace and life

Clutter got you down? This five-step process will reduce your stress and open up space to allow new energy, ideas, and creativity to flow in. All you have to do is just do it! Enjoy the process and implement it with your nursing staff too.

1. Schedule a quarterly de-cluttering day on your calendar.

2. At the beginning of your de-cluttering day, do the following:
I. Set the intention of finishing the day with a neat clean office filled with open space
II. Commit to staying focused on the task at hand and don’t allow distractions
III. Put on some great music that gets you energized
IV. Put a large waste receptacle in your office to receive all the discarded stuff
V. Put a large box or bag in your office to receive items you will give away or donate [more]

Try This: Build nursing team self-esteem

Hierarchy of Voice

Excerpted from Ending Nurse-to-Nurse Hostility, Second Edition, by Kathleen Bartholomew

Try the following exercise that I often use to encourage nurses’ self-esteem. I call it a “hierarchy of voice” because each step results in greater empowerment. Addressing specific behaviors that are a challenge to a nurse stimulates meaningful conversations about that individual’s stumbling blocks to empowerment and self-esteem.

In performance evaluations, share the following list and ask team members to pick 10 meaningful actions that they would like to [more]

A Simple Interprofessional Accountability Technique

Listening, validating and asking for a commitment

From Team-Building Handbook: Accountability Strategies for Nurses, by Eileen Lavin Dohmann, RN, MBA, NEA-BC

accountability scenario

When working with a group, I assume that people are rational and logical.

So, if I want them to do something, I just need to explain it and they’ll do it. When I don’t get the results I am seeking, I tend to think “Oh, I must not be explaining it well. Let me try it again.”

It’s taken me a long time to realize that what I was hearing as “not understanding me” was often someone’s polite way of telling me no. So, now when I find myself explaining the same thing to someone for the third time, I stop and ask the person what he or she is hearing me request. If I can validate that the person is hearing me correctly, I ask for the commitment: yes or no.

Validating… and asking for a yes or no

We can hold ourselves accountable, but holding other people accountable can be much more difficult. Consider this nurse-physician scenario and ask yourself [more]