Trial of Alzheimer’s drug provides hopeful results

A large clinical trial has, for the first time, shown that a drug can reduce both plaques in the brains of patients with Alzheimer’s disease and slow the progression of their dementia.
According to The New York Times, results presented at the Alzheimer’s Association International Conference in Chicago showed the drug, known currently as BAN2401, actually slowed memory decline and other cognitive difficulties, as well as reduced amyloid levels in brains of affected patients. The trial …

Could education prevent the overuse of antibiotics for UTIs?

A study recently published in the Annals of Long-Term Care found that a checklist and certain other care and training interventions lowered the risk of UTIs and over-treatment of UTIs with antibiotics. Results of the study were presented at the American Geriatric Society 2018 Annual Scientific Meetings in Orlando, FL.
The study is part of a Geriatric Fellowship program at Florida Hospital. The study found that a urinalysis is often requested by family or the care …

Fine tune your antibiotic stewardship methods by November deadline

Prior to the publication of CMS’ final rule on October 4, 2016, which heavily revised many Conditions of Participation (CoP) for Medicare, the agency’s infection control regulation included language about preventing the threat of multi-drug-resistant organisms and creating strategies for effective review of antibiotic use in long-term care facilities to avoid negative, sometimes deadly, effects of resistance. Now, this revised section of the rule addresses antibiotic stewardship efforts directly, and requires providers to take a …

Is it Dementia, or is it a treatable condition?

Sudden changes in mood, memory, personality, or behavior are not typical of a cognitive disease progression and may instead indicate the presence of something treatable. All too often, however, when a person has dementia, the care team is quick to blame the disease progression for every other thing that goes wrong. If a resident hits a staff member, they assume he did so because “he has dementia.” If another resident struggles to eat, staff are …