Get involved in educating other long-term care professionals!

HCPro is seeking enthusiastic long-term care managers, nurse leaders, and nurse educators to join an ad-hoc group interested in reading and reviewing prepublication drafts of books and training materials in your areas of interest and expertise. Our editors will send you periodic emails listing upcoming projects available for outside review.
If you’re interested, just let us know. We’ll send reviewing guidelines and give you an idea of our timeframe. If it works for you, we’ll send …

Housekeeping for senior living Part 1: Cleaning and disinfecting

The following is an excerpt from Disaster Planning, Infection Control, and OSHA Compliance: A Toolkit for Senior Living written by Karen T. Stratoti, RN, BSN, LNHA, CALA.
Many of the staff in a senior living facility are considered “universal workers” and are responsible for the cleaning and disinfection of residents’ apartment units in addition to caring for their residents. Most senior living staff have responsibilities that are scheduled on a daily, weekly, quarterly, and yearly basis. …

New voluntary bundled payment model announced

On January 9, 2018, CMS’ Innovation Center announced the launch of a new voluntary bundled payment model called Bundled Payments for Care Improvement Advanced (BPCI Advanced). Under traditional fee-for-service payment, Medicare pays providers for each individual service they perform. Under this bundled payment model, participants can earn additional payment if all expenditures for a beneficiary’s episode of care are under a spending target that factors in quality.
Bundled payments create incentives for providers and practitioners to work together …

Failed studies uncover answers to finding the cure for Alzheimer’s

Scientists are optimistic that finding the cure for Alzheimer’s—a disease currently afflicting 5 million people in the United States alone—may be within reach. This sentiment might seem unrealistic when you look at the statistics—only about 1% of scientific discoveries lead to medicine that is used by patients—but forward thinking scientists remind us to remember where we started.
Until recently, the only way to determine whether someone had Alzheimer’s was through an autopsy. Now, however, positron-emission tomography …