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When the tough get going: Emergency Management and other considerations

First off (and apologies for the short lead time on this), but next week (February 13), CDC is hosting a webinar on the importance of assessing for environmental exposures during emergencies (and in general). While this is likely to be some useful information as a going concern, you can also earn CEUs for tuning in. A summary of the program as well as registration information, etc., can be found here. Overall, I think hospitals had a pretty good track record of emergency response in 2017, but somehow these things never seem to get easier over time…

Another issue that I see starting to gain a little traction in the survey world is dealing with concerns relating to medical gas and vacuum systems; for the most part (I’m sure there are some exceptions, but I can’t say that I’ve run into them), folks in hospitals tend to rely on contracted vendors to do the formal inspection, testing, and maintenance of medical gas and vacuum systems, which tends to keep an in-depth knowledge of the dirty details at (more or less) arm’s length. A couple of weeks ago, I received some information from Jason Di Marco of Compliant Healthcare Technologies (many thanks to Jason!) that I thought would be worth sharing with you folks. Of primary interest is a downloadable guide to medical gas systems (available here in exchange for your email address) that really gives a good overview of the nuts and bolts (as it were) of your med gas system. Jason also publishes a blog on the critical aspects of medical gas and vacuum system inspection, testing, maintenance, compliance, etc., where I found a fair amount of useful information. Again, I can see the regulatory compliance laser focus starting to turn in the direction of all the systems covered under NFPA 99 and I can also see some of those prickly surveyor types trying to pick at the knowledge base of the folks managing these processes. So, in the interest of never having too much information, I would suggest getting a little more intimate with your medical gas and vacuum systems.

Documentary evidence: More you need to know…

Another perpetually sticky wicket in the survey process (and we’ve discussed this, oh, once or twice before) is the timeliness of documentation from maintenance and testing vendors and the expectations of how that process has to be managed. During an ASHE-sponsored webinar last fall, George Mills posited the scenario in which there is a delay (delay times can vary, but you probably have a pretty good idea of how long you have to wait for reports to come back from your vendors) in receiving a report for fire alarm testing in which a handful of devices failed during routine testing. If you don’t receive the failure information immediately upon its identification by the vendor, what you are saying, in effect, is that it’s okay for me not to “know” (there’s that word again) how reliable my fire alarm system is for a month while I’m waiting for the report. If any of you think that it is indeed “okay” not to know might want to think about another line of work. From an empirical standpoint, a failed fire alarm device puts the building occupants (patients, staff—you know, those folks) at a greater risk, which is never, never, never a good idea. And what if you don’t get the report for six weeks, the failed devices haven’t been replaced, and now you’re looking at the possibility for having to manage the deficiency with a PFI, ILSM assessment—the whole magillah. Truthfully, you have better things to do with your time.

Mr. Mills’ suggestion (and I think it’s a good one, having made the suggestion at least once or twice in the past) is to ensure (either contractually or otherwise) that any deficiencies identified are in your possession before they “complete” their work. You can set it up so they let you know at the end of each testing day (that would be my preference) or at the end of the engagement. But you have got to have that information in your possession as soon as it can be made available to you. The occupants of your building depend on each and every element of your systems—fire alarm, fire extinguishment, medical gas and vacuum, emergency power—you know that list by heart and it’s your responsibility that they are managed appropriately.