RSSAll Entries Tagged With: "utility systems management"

Maybe there’s a hole in there somewhere: Keeping your critical equipment running!

An interesting line of questioning is emerging in some recent survey activity (mostly during state visits, but the accreditation organizations are moving in this direction, particularly those with a focus on ISO processes) relates to the management of “high mortality” utility systems components, particularly emergency power supply system parts. If you look at this as a function of high reliability, ensuring that you have close to immediate access to a means of repairing those things that are most likely to break (and I suspect that everyone out there in the reading audience know which of your utility systems are most likely to give you fits—from experience, elevators always seem to figure in on that count).

I think in most instances it would require some level of working with your service providers to identify the things that are most likely to go wrong and then to set up a process for ensuring ready access to parts and service. Let’s face it, there are few more angst-filled moments than when you have to tell your boss that a critical piece of equipment is going to be down because parts need to be ordered, etc. And I don’t know of too many service vendors that are maintaining a broad-range of replacement parts, etc. on their shelves (I’m sure there are some and that’s great for you if they “live” in your neighborhood); inventory can be an expensive undertaking. But maybe there’s a way to build that into your next service contract—something to think about—your incumbent is probably going to have the most specific failure data relative to your equipment, but I would think there are sufficient commonalities of systems and equipment to allow for competitive proposals if you choose to go that route.

Some other contractual considerations (and this is more on the compliance front than anything, but still)—a “hard” touch whenever folks are onsite servicing equipment—at the very least, they can let you know if they see anything that might prove troublesome, so you don’t have to hunt for it when the paperwork arrives (hopefully sooner rather than later—that’s another contractual consideration—turnaround time for service reports/records). I don’t know that we’ll ever have enough granularity of data from the regulatory folks, but I am absolutely convinced (based on what I’ve seen) that the reason that findings in and around fire safety (and other) systems documentation relates to stuff being buried in vendor reports: the “classic” smoke detector that didn’t get tested or the heat detector in an elevator shaft that someone terms “inaccessible.” We (as a collective) are on the hook for ensuring that 100% of your devices and equipment are inspected, tested, and maintained in accordance with code and regulation. Our vendors really don’t have any “skin” in the game.

I’m sure this is all rather self-evident to you folks, but where I’m sitting at the moment, there’s not a lot of “new” stuff floating around and it was a miserable rainy day, so this is what the connection of head and fingers conjured up.

May you live in interesting times…no duh!

Well, now that we are well and truly ensconced in the post-July 2014 world, perhaps things will quiet down a bit on the updated standards front. It’s been a very busy first half of 2014 relative to The Joint Commission’s ongoing alignment with the CMS Conditions of Participation and perhaps they’ll allow the smoke to clear a bit so we can get down to figuring out how much impact the changes to the standards will have in the medical equipment and utility systems management pursuits. Kind of makes you wonder what’s left to update/align, but let’s hold that card for another day.

So, the last salvo in June saw some fairly interesting edits of (to? you be the judge) the medical equipment and utility systems management standards and performance elements (visit here for details). As near as I can tell, the most eventful changes relate to the change of the life support and non-life support equipment categories to a somewhat more expansive (or at least it seems that way to me) categorization of high-risk (which includes life support medical and utility systems equipment) and non-high-risk (which includes pretty much everything else). To be honest, most (probably all, but I don’t want to use too big a blanket for this) of the programs I’ve had the privilege to review/evaluate have moved to the high-medium-low-no risk strategy for assigning preventive maintenance activities and frequencies, so I’m not sure that this will require any fundamental changes to how folks are administering their programs. But (and there’s always, always, always one of those when there is an official change in the standards), I am curious to see how these changes will be applied during accreditation surveys. I expect the life safety surveyors to have a good grasp on the practical impact of the changes, but what about the rest of the survey team as they wander around the corridors of healthcare organizations across the country. It’s not unheard of for standards changes to “drive” an increase in findings in those particular areas as surveyor knowledge expands/contracts/evolves/mutates so it will be interesting to see what types of findings may fall out of the changes.

I guess my best advice at the moment is to do a careful assessment of where your program is relative to the “new” standards, particularly if you have adopted an “alternative equipment maintenance” (AEM) program (this must be that alternative lifestyle I keep hearing about…). I suspect we are all going to need to be prepared to make full use of the post-survey process (especially the clarification process) to demonstrate the “compliance-ness” of our programs. As I tell folks at virtually every stop on my never-ending tour of hospitals, there will always be surveyors that will disagree with programmatic decisions that you’ve made. Your task/responsibility is to have a very clear understanding of how your program meets the intent and the spirit of the standards, regardless of how something might “look” to a surveyor. At the end of the day, it’s about supplying to our customers safe and reliable medical and utility systems equipment—and as long as we can demonstrate that within the confines of the standards –then we have fully honored that obligation. And that, my friends, is what compliance-ness is all about.