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Hyperbaric oxygen makes some noise. Also: Stop, in the name of…the law? Love? Sanity?

First off, a quick word for those of you with responsibilities relating to hyperbaric oxygen chambers: NFPA 99 (2012) 14.2.4.5.3 states, “A source of breathable gas allowing unrestricted mobility shall be available outside a Class A or Class B chamber for use by personnel in the event that the air in the vicinity of the chamber is fouled by smoke or other combustion products of fire.” Soooooo, if you have not yet ordered a smoke hood with integral filter/air supply (or similar equipment) available for staff to use in case of a fire, then I would advise you to take very quick action on this, particularly if you are anticipating a survey sooner rather than later. Just as the recent medical equipment EP changes relative to oxygen equipment for hyperbaric oxygen environments came down from the mountain on composite-stone tablets, so too must the intricacies of Chapter 14 of NFPA 99-2012 be absorbed. Nothing like more new stuff to figure out…

Next up, a few random thoughts (more or less) about education and ensuring effectiveness (which might very well be a lost cause, yet I remain stubbornly hopeful).

The item that I keep coming up against is the thought/assumption (and yes, I know all about that last one) that the folks I see driving cars in various parts of the country are in fact licensed drivers. With the extended thought that in order to procure said license, there was some level of rudimentary testing of the budding licensee’s knowledge of the rules of the road. Now I will stipulate for all time that there is probably enough focus on simple driving etiquette and likely never will be. But, but, but, I am confident that there are certain elements that are universally covered in driver education and competency evaluation. So, I ask you this simple question: What is octagonal in shape, red in color, and provides what used to be a very specific command? (Hint: It’s a four letter word that, when reversed, describes cookware or perhaps earthenware.)

If you don’t know, it would seem that you are not alone…

It appears to me from my simple (but fairly voluminous at this point) observations that adherence to the octagonal has morphed into a corollary of the traffic signal (green means “go”; yellow means “speed up”; red means “it’s for the person behind me”). It’s gotten to the point where I’ve been honked at for actually coming to a full stop at these points and, to be honest, I’m not really sure how it all came to be widespread. I know it’s not because folks weren’t taught the expectation when encountering a stop sign (though I’m pretty sure that “yield” isn’t covered), but it does lead me to the question of how effectively do we “do” education?

Dragging this out into the hospital realm, I’m sure you’ve all come up against those survey encounters in which you cringe because you can’t be certain that the proper (never mind correct!) response is hard-wired into staff (particularly entry-level). Every day you see people doing things they have been instructed time and time again not to do (parking equipment, etc., in front of fire extinguishers, pull stations—you know the drill). And with alarmingly increasing frequency, you see people acting in a freakishly unsafe manner (e.g., cell phone use while driving); it can’t be that they don’t know and it can’t be that they are not at least somewhat familiar with the consequences. As a boss once told me: “You can’t mandate intelligence” (Ron White made a gazillion dollars converting that to something a little more folksy), but if that’s the case, how big a “stick” do you need to carry? Does a stick even work effectively anymore?

One of the key elements of post-survey corrective action plans is an increasing focus on how we plan to keep whatever it was from happening again. And I look at a majority of the findings and I’m thinking how far does one have to go to resolve each and every little thing for all time? I believe we should always be working towards perfection, but I am not so crazy as to think we’re going to get there anytime soon…

Jan. 20 webcast highlights how to deal with high-risk patients

Patients with high-risk behaviors pose a danger to healthcare staff and other patients and are difficult for healthcare employees to manage. In this live webcast, expert speakers Tony W. York, MS, MBA, CHPA, CPP, and Jeff Puttkammer, M.Ed., will discuss the patient factors that often lead to violent events in the workplace, provide a clear understanding of environmental influences and triggers that contribute to violence, and supply tools and resources to help you reduce the risk of a violent event in your facility. The program is scheduled for Wednesday, January 20 from 1 to 2:30 p.m. ET.

Employees have the power to influence their own safety, but they often lack the proper training. Give your staff the knowledge they need to deal with high-risk patients and keep themselves and their facility safe!

At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to:

  • Define high-risk patient behavior (more than just mental health patients)
  • Explain how a balanced approach to patient-focused care and personal safety impacts patient satisfaction and work-related injuries
  • Identify how workspace design and medical equipment placement can promote or reduce the safety of staff, patients, and visitors
  • Define policies, procedures, and practices aimed at reducing safety risks associated with at-risk patients
  • Understand the critical role staff education and training plays in helping provide the culture, tools, and competencies required to successfully reduce and manage patient-generated violence

Visit here for more information and to register.

Train staff on revised HazComm standard with new DVD

OSHA’s revised Hazard Communication standard requires hospitals and other healthcare facilities to have trained staff on the new Globally Harmonized System (GHS) by December 2013. The intent is to make the identification of hazardous chemicals much quicker and easier, and to make it faster to find recommended first aid procedures in the event of worker exposure.

HCPro will offer several staff training solutions to help facilities, including Hazard Communication Training: Implementing the GHS, a new DVD that will be available in December. This video will help you:

  • Meet OSHA requirements for training employees on the Hazard Communication standard
  • Train staff to understand the revised Hazard Communication standard
  • Improve hazardous chemical safety in your facility
  • Learn the new pictograms issued by OSHA

Chemical manufacturers aren’t required to comply with the new regulations until June 1, 2015. That means there will be close to a two-year gap during which employees will need to understand the traditional material safety data sheets (MSDS) as well as the new safety data sheets (SDS).

Visit the HCPro Marketplace for more information and to order.