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How many feet in a mile? How many square feet in a smoke compartment?

I recently came across a survey finding that I thought would be worth sharing with the class. In this particular survey, an organization was cited because it had not identified the square footage of their smoke compartments on its life safety drawings (this was a Direct Impact finding relative to maintaining a current e-SOC). In looking over the information published in the October 2012 issue of Perspectives (See the highlight box on p. 12 entitled “What to Include in Life Safety Code Drawings.” Please check it out if you have not yet done so; anything that shows up in Perspectives is enforceable as a standard!), I clearly see that there is a requirement to include the square footage of any areas designated as suites.

The only mention of smoke compartments indicates that they are required to be identified by location, but there is no mention of the square footage. Now this would seem to be a case of a surveyor interpreting (perhaps even over-interpreting) a requirement based on information that has not appeared in either the standards manual or in Perspectives (square footage for smoke compartments isn’t mentioned in the February 2012 issue of Environment of Care News either). I think this would be a good survey finding with which to practice using the clarification process and I suspect that the organization in question is going to make good use of that process.

If only it were a tankless job…

And yet another story from the survey wars, this time regarding the number of oxygen cylinders that are allowed in a smoke compartment. As was the case regarding the eyewash station risk assessment discussion, this one comes from a Focused Standards Assessment (FSA) survey that I did not personally attend, so if you feel the grain of salt is once again needed, I will wait for you to fetch said salt before I start. Ready? Okay.

Anyway, in this particular survey, the FSA surveyor informed the organization that it could only have 12 oxygen cylinders in a smoke compartment, in this case, the ED. But wait, you say, what’s wrong with that? Read on, read on! Further discussion ensued in which the surveyor indicated that the 12 oxygen cylinders included the cylinders that were on, for example, the stretchers in the individual bays in the ED (this particular ED is designated as a suite of rooms). Now this kind of (okay, very much so) flies in the face of the whole “in use” versus “storage” concept where you can have “storage” of no more than 12 cylinders in a smoke compartment, but you can also have a number of cylinders that are considered “in use.” You will find a most excellent examples of how this works (and please try not to focus on the irony of this information source) in the December 2012 issue of Perspectives; on the right hand column of p. 10, George Mills describes a situation that uncannily resembles the condition that the FSA surveyor indicated was not compliant. And says that it’s okay, because the cylinders on the stretchers would be considered “in use.” If that don’t beat all…

I guess this ultimately goes back to the importance of “knowing” where you stand in terms of compliance. “Knowing” that the oxygen cylinders are considered in use and thus, within allowances, then you can respectfully (perhaps even silently) disagree with the surveyor and go back to more important things. And I suppose if you wanted to be fresh, you could suggest the surveyor sign up for a subscription to Perspectives. Unfortunately, they don’t have those little cards that fall out and can be mailed in as a gag…