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History shows again and again how standards (and EPs) point out the folly of men…

It’s beginning to look like the proofreaders in Chicago must be enduring some late nights watching the Cubs! I don’t know about you folks, but I rely rather heavily on the regular missives from The Joint Commission, collectively known as Joint Commission E-Alerts. The E-Alerts deliver regular packages of yummy goodness to my email box (okay, that may be a little hyperbolic) and yesterday’s missive was no exception. Well, actually, there was an exception—more on that in a moment.

While it did not get top billing in the Alert (which seems kind of odd given what’s been going on this year), the pre-publication changes to the Life Safety chapter of the accreditation manual have been revealed, including comparison tables between what we had in January 2016 and what we can expect in January 2017. Interestingly enough, the comparison tables include the Environment of Care (EC) chapter stuff as well (though the EC chapter did not merit a mention in the E-Alert), so there’s lots of information to consider (which we will be doing over the course of the next little while) and some subtle alterations to the standards/EP language. For example (and this is the first “change” that I noted in reviewing the 112 pages of standards/EPs), the note for EC.02.02.01, EP 9 (the management of risks associated with hazardous gases and vapors) expands the “reach” to specifically include waste anesthetic gas disposal and laboratory rooftop exhaust (yes, I know…very sexy stuff!). It does appear that at least some of the changes (tough to figure out the split between what is truly “new” and what is merely a clarification of existing stuff—check out the note under EC.02.03.05, EP 1 regarding supervisory signal devices because it provides a better sense of what could be included in the mix). Another interesting change occurs under EC.02.03.05 (and this applies to all the testing EPs) is that where previously the requirement was for the completion dates of the testing to be documented, now the requirement actually states that the results of the testing are to be documented in addition to the completion dates. Again, a subtle change in the language and certainly nothing that they haven’t been surveying to. Oh, and one addition to the canon is the annual inspection and testing of door assemblies “by individuals who can demonstrate knowledge and understanding of the operating components of the door being tested. Testing begins with a pre-test visual inspection; testing includes both sides of the opening.” At any rate, I will keep plowing through the comparison table. (Remember in the old days, it would be called a crosswalk. Has the 21st century moved so far ahead that folks don’t know what a crosswalk is anymore?)

The top billing in yesterday’s All Hallows Eve E-Alert (making it an Eve-Alert, I suppose) went to the latest installment in that peppiest of undertakings, the Physical Environment Portal. Where the proofreaders comment comes into play is that the Alert mentions the posting of the information relative to LS.02.01.30, (which happened back in August) but when you click on the link, it takes you to the update page, where the new material is identified as covering LS.02.01.35, so there is updated material, though you couldn’t really tell by the Alert. So, we have general compliance information for the physical environment folks, some kicky advice and information for organizational leadership, and (Bonus! Bonus! Bonus!) information regarding the clinical impact of appropriately maintaining fire suppression systems (there is mention of sprinkler systems, but also portable fire extinguishers). I’d be interested to see if anyone finds the clinical impact information to be of particular use/effectiveness. I don’t know that compliance out in the field (or, more appropriately, noncompliance) is based on how knowledgeable folks are about what to do and what not to do, though perhaps it is the importance of the fire suppression systems and the reasons for having such systems (Can you imagine having to evacuate every time the fire alarm activates? That would be very stinky.) that is getting lost in the translation. I have no reason to think that the number of findings is going to be decreasing in this area (if you’re particularly interested, the comparison table section on LS.02.01.35 begins on p. 80 of that document—any changes that I can see do appear likely to make compliance easier), so I guess we’ll have to keep an eye on the final pages of survey year 2016 and the opening of the 2017 survey season. Be still my beating heart!

Hortle didn’t hear a portal (with apologies to one T. Geisel)

As I get a little longer in the tooth, I find that I need to create reminders for myself of subjects to cover during our weekly visits. Typically, I will capture an idea as a draft email and return to it as time permits. At any rate, as you are very much aware, there’s been a lot of material in recent weeks that have precluded the need to dig into my archives, but in the interest of keeping my draft emails at a manageable level, as well as making sure that I cover all the discussion points that I wanted to share, over the next little bit (unless something breaks big or bad in the compliance world) I’m going to set the wayback machine for stun and run a few timeless classics (at least I think they’re timeless—please feel free to disagree). Let’s hark back to July to revisit a concept that occupies a lot of my waking time: stewardship and accountability for the management of the physical environment.

As I was lurking about Joint Commission’s Physical Environment Portal (PEP) to see if there were any updates to be found, I stumbled upon a missive in TJC’s leadership blog that I did not recall seeing. This dates back to October 2015 in those halcyon days of the early chortlings of the portal… (insert going back in time sound effects here).

In looking at this particular missive (penned by one G. Mills, Director, Department of Engineering—you can find the whole magillah here), there is some ground covered that is among my most favoritest of topics: the universality of the responsibilities when it comes to the management of the physical environment (and for those you who are keeping count, I have no idea how many times I’ve discussed this particular topic, but I’m going to guess it’s well into double digits. And that’s not even counting the number of times I’ve had variations of this conversation with clients). In the blog, Mr. Mills notes that “…the patient care environment is not owned by one group in the healthcare setting.” I couldn’t agree more and yet I still (still, still, still!) encounter organizations that have not fully embraced that concept—which results in very little surprise on my part that eight of the 10 most frequently cited standards are in the physical environment. Mr. Mills goes on to say, “(W)e cannot look to one group to keep the area clean, another to keep the area warm/cool, and then another group to treat patients independently.” But organizations continue to do just that, get bounced around during surveys, and still (still, still, still!) fail to grasp the team concept of managing the environment.

Now it’s certainly not every organization that has these issues, but until every organization gets “down” with this as a way of conducting the business of healthcare, the EC/LS findings will continue to pile up. The silos of clinical and non-clinical functions in healthcare organizations are no longer a tenable model—I’ve said it before and I will (no doubt) say it again—every individual working at every level in every healthcare organization is a caregiver. I’ll give you the direct/indirect split, but taking care of the patient in the bed is the role and responsibility of everyone. It is past time for a new paradigm. Let’s make it happen—even without updates to the PEP!

As a closing thought, I was rather remiss in my discussion of the final CMS emergency preparedness rule. I neglected to indicate that the new regulations are effective 60 days after publication in the Federal Register (which plunks us into November 2016—you can make a reference to turkeys if you like) and implementation must be completed by November 15, 2017 (again, I will stand by my stand that this is not going to be a very big deal for hospitals—I have yet to find anything that is well and truly new and/or different in what is actually required. As with all things, I suspect that the worm will turn on the interpretive dances of the surveyors).

At any rate, if you don’t have plans for next Tuesday at 1:30 pm EDT, you might want to check out the public call to discuss the new rule, hosted by CMS’ Medicare Learning Network. The call is scheduled to last 90 minutes and you can register here. I will be doing client work that day, but I suspect that there might one or two folks from the editorial world that may tune in, so I am looking forward to finding out what the “skinny” might be on all this stuff. Much ado about nothing or something wicked this way comes? I guess we’ll find out soon enough…

If accredited you wish to be, you must answer these questions three!

And other tales: If you thought the dervishes were whirling last week…you ain’t seen nothing!

Hortal hears a chortle from the portal: The much-anticipated (you tell me how hyperbolic that characterization might be…) return of updated content for the Joint Commission (oops, THE Joint Commission)’s Physical Environment Portal (PEP) has finally reached these shores. O frabjous day! Callooh! Callay! He chortled in his joy (from Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll; see, chortling has been around for a while…).

The new content breaks down into three sections: one for facilities and safety folks, one for leadership, and one for clinical folks, lending further emphasis to the ongoing melding  of the management of the physical environment into a tripod-like structure (tripods having more stability and strength than a one- or two-legged structure—think about that one for a moment). At any rate, interestingly enough, the suggested solutions for both the clinical and leadership “legs” of the tripod are aimed at “supporting” the facilities “leg” through endorsement of the key process(es) as well as keeping smoke doors closed, not compromising closing devices (how may doors can a doorstop stop if a doorstop could stop doors?), and participation during construction activities. So, if you visit the noted URLs, you will find a whole bunch of stuff, some of it downloadable, to share with the other “legs” in your organization. It seems pretty evident to me, that at least part of the intent of the information shared, particularly the stuff earmarked for leadership and clinical folks, is to ratchet up the “investment” of those two groups in the management of the physical environment. On the face of it, nobody in healthcare has “time” to shoulder this burden on their own, hence the practical application of the tripod (sort of: that may be a bit of a reach on my part, but there’s some truth lurking around somewhere—and we will ferret it out).

Also breaking recently was the information (funneled from our fine friends at ASHE) that TJC is going to be including a set of three questions in the pre-building tour portion of the survey process (I think this is in addition to other questions that might be asked, including whether you have any identified Life Safety Code® (LSC) deficiencies). The intent, as described by Jim Kendig, TJC’s field director for surveyor management and development (I worked with Jim, like, a million years ago. Hi, Jim!), is to gather some pertinent/useful information before setting out to tour your facility.

Question 1: What type of firestopping is used in the facility?

Question 2: What is your organization’s policy regarding accessing interstitial spaces and ceiling panel removal?

Question 3: Which materials are used for high-level disinfection or sterilization?

On the face of it, I’m thinking the response to Question 1 might very well be the most challenging as I can’t recall too many facilities that have just one manufacturer’s product protecting their rated barriers. My consultative advice is you would be well-served to have some sort of document that identifies the various products in use, where they “live” in your organization, perhaps even color pictures of the products in situ so the surveyors will know what they are looking for (and please don’t try to pass off that yellow expanding foam stuff as an appropriate product—no point in getting into a urination competition with a surveyor over that). As to the other questions, as near as I can tell they’re pretty straightforward; the surveyor is going to have plan for extra time if a containment has to be erected/constructed for every ceiling tile removal or perhaps they will identify specific locations for inspections and just run through those one after the other. As to high-level disinfection and sterilization, lots of environmental and infection control opportunities for bungles there (BTW, it’s probably a very good idea to have a very good idea where those processes are occurring; it can be more widespread than you would prefer).

As a final thought for this week, I would encourage you to participate in ASHE’s survey of the potential impact of CMS’s requirement for all hospital outpatient surgery departments to be classified as Ambulatory Surgical occupancies under chapters 20 and 21 of the 2012 LSC. There is a fair amount of potential that this requirement is going to have an impact on facilities in which dental or oral surgery is being performed, plastic surgery, endoscopy, laser surgeries, etc. To help with the assessment of the impact of this change, ASHE is asking folks to complete a survey for each of the facilities you oversee that will be affected; you can find the survey here. https://app.smartsheet.com/b/form?EQBCT=c66f01e829184b648b4b0db3fd2cc552

I think it’s probably well worth your time to at least see what they’re asking about; I’m beginning to think that we are going to look back on 2016 as a really ugly year (compliance, popular culture, you name it!). Where’s that fast-forward button…or do we talk to Mr. Peabody and Sherman about that Wayback Machine…

Maybe these maps and legends have been misunderstood…

I don’t know about you folks, but The Joint Commission’s discontinuation of the PFI process has left me in a rather unsettled state. Heretofore, I think many of us (and I will include myself among that number) relied on TJC to provide some level of illumination into the inner workings of compliance as a function of what CMS is requiring. As I think I noted earlier, I was fully cognizant that CMS has been no particular fan of the PFI process as a means of ensuring compliance with the Life Safety Code®, but (presumably) there was always a tacit understanding—falling somewhat short of acceptance—that the PFI process wasn’t causing enough of a ripple in the fabric of compliance to warrant any direct intervention.

And now we find ourselves officially in August and still awaiting the arrival of the latest modular addition to The Joint Commission’s Physical Environment Portal (PEP), which was “scheduled” for a July release (at least that’s been the info posted on the portal site). At this point, I’m starting to think that the life safety modules may be on hold until the updated Life Safety chapter is unveiled later this year (presumably sometime ’twixt now and November). But the greater concern I have (and hopefully this is just a hyperbolic response to the deluge of changes) is whether the information contained in the PEP (and, to some degree, the physical environment FAQs) is as valuable (Useful? Reliable?) when it comes to keeping in line with CMS’ expectations. I think to one extent or another, we all relied on TJC as an arbiter/translator of how the physical environment Conditions of Participation could be interpreted/implemented from a practical/operational standpoint, but now I can’t help but wonder if that status has been torn asunder along with the PFI process. I’m probably over-thinking this, but I don’t have a feeling of comfort with the current state of things. I guess we shall see what we shall see—I, as always, remain optimistic, but, for whatever reason, it seems to be more of a struggle at the moment. But enough of that, for the moment…

As I was checking to see if there was an update to be found, I stumbled upon a missive in TJC’s leadership blog that I do not recall having seen before. So let me take you back about 10 months to those halcyon days of the early chortlings of the portal… (insert going back in time sound effects here).

In looking at this particular missive (penned by one G. Mills, Director, Department of Engineering—you can find the whole magillah here), there is some ground covered that is among my most favoritest of topics: the universality of the responsibilities when it comes to the management of the physical environment (and for those you who are keeping count, I have no idea how many times I’ve discussed this particular topic, but I’m going to guess it’s well into double digits. And that’s not even counting the number of times I’ve had variations of this conversation with clients…). In the blog, Mr. Mills notes that “…the patient care environment is not owned by one group in the healthcare setting.” I couldn’t agree more and yet I still (still, still, still!) encounter organizations that have not fully embraced that concept—which results in very little surprise on my part that eight of the 10 most frequently cited standards are in the physical environment. Mr. Mills goes on to say, “(W)e cannot look to one group to keep the area clean, another to keep the area warm/cool and then another group to treat patients independently.” But organizations continue to do just that, get bounced around during surveys, and still (still, still, still!) fail to grasp the team concept of managing the environment.

Now it’s certainly not every organization that has these issues, but until every organization gets “down” with this as a way of conducting the business of healthcare, the EC/LS findings will continue to pile up. The silos of clinical and non-clinical functions in healthcare organizations are no longer a tenable model—I’ve said it before and I will (no doubt) say it again—every individual working at every level in every healthcare organization is a caregiver. I’ll give you the direct/indirect split, but taking care of the patient in the bed is the role and responsibility of everyone. It is past time for a new paradigm—let’s make it happen—even without updates to the PEP!

Regardless of what happens in regards to the TJC/CMS dynamic, I think that healthcare as an industry needs to embrace this model for management of the physical environment. I know on an individual basis, everyone is wicked busy, but the success or failure of the management of the physical environment is a function of how ingrained the “see something, say something” philosophy is at point of care/point of service. You and I both know that I could say that I will speak of this no more, but you and I also know that the chances of my avoiding this topic are somewhere between slim and none…

Before you a-Q’s me, take a look for yourself…

As we await new content on the PEP (aka the newly-popular Joint Commission offering, the Physical Environment Portal), I want to draw your attention to an interesting development on another part of the Joint Commission’s website: the ever-popular (such popularity and minimal polarity…) Frequently Asked Questions page (now re-imagined as Standards Interpretations—really, check it out). And let me tell you, there is a ton of newly configured information to be found. If I were really attentive to such things (I usually am, but in this case I wasn’t expecting such a sweeping re-imagination of this part of the TJC website), I would be able to tell you how much more information there is to be had, but I think I can safely say that, at least in terms of the numbers of entries, the amount has easily doubled in relation to the “old” FAQ page. Some of the material appears to be derived from information that had been previously shared through George Mills’ Clarifications and Expectations column in Joint Commission Perspectives; other bits and pieces seem to be derived from information shared on the PEP. There also seems to be some stuff that hinges on the practical application of the now-expiring CMS categorical waivers (which I guess means there will be some updating of content in the not-too-distant future) and some other stuff that appears to have been developed specifically for this new page. (Dare we call it the Standards Interpretation Portal? We’ll be able to engage in regular SIP-ing!)

At any rate, I’m going to be poring over these entries with great interest and I would recommend that you keep a close eye on the SIP as well. Remember, the interpretations published on the SIP (I really do like that!) are “enforceable” as standards, and there’s no reason to think that TJC surveyors aren’t going to be checking out these materials as well. One interesting note: I don’t recall seeing any official announcement regarding the re-birthing of the FAQs (I won’t claim that I track every utterance from the folks in Chicago), so I may be pre-empting the grand unveiling (if you have a standards question, don’t forget to SIP!).

One item that really caught my fancy (and this was in response to a client question) was the entry regarding oxygen storage, which I know has plagued a number of organizations, particularly as a function of the segregation requirements. My thoughts on this have been that the simplest means of separation is to focus on full and not-full as the segregation metric; most folks do not have sufficient space to be able to reasonably pull off the full/in use/empty trifecta and NFPA 99 really only requires that the full cylinders be separated from everything else. So, if you use the full/not full designations, it’s not only a simpler decision-making process in the moment, it appears to be in keeping with the information shared on the SIP.

I’ll let you be the judge of what’s going to work in your organization, but I do believe that the fewer complications in the mix, the greater the likelihood of compliance.

I recommend you starting SIP-ing right away and maintain your compliance hydration throughout the hot summer months!

 

The end of hordes of portal exhortals: Getting hep to the PEP!

Lots of information to cover this week, so let’s get started.

Effective July 1, 2016, there are a few EC performance elements that will be ushered into the archives; in looking at the provided information, which includes rationales for the removal of each EP: the decision-making process pretty much sorted out into four categories; 1) the EP is implicit in another EP in the standard; 2) the EP is duplicative of another EP in the standard; 3) the EP reflects an issue that should be left to the discretion of the organization, or, 4) the EP is considered part of regular operations and is reflected elsewhere in the standards. So that all seems pretty rational (which is a most excellent starting point for a rationale), but there have been instances in the past when the removal of an EP has ended up complicating compliance (the most prominent example being the removal of the EP requiring the triennial review of safety-related policies and procedures, which was “replaced” with the expectation that the annual evaluation process for each EC management plan would be inclusive of a review of policies and procedures), so this latest revelation may end up being something of the proverbial double-edged sword.

That said, I don’t see anything that I would consider particularly problematic: interventionary powers for immediate threats to life and/or health; managing the risks inherent with allowing patients to smoke; self-determination when it comes to soliciting input to aid the process for selecting and acquiring medical equipment; interim measures and re-testing of emergency power system components when there are failures; a little more flexibility regarding the practical administration of your improvement activities relative to EC. These all seem fairly benign. It does make me wonder if this is as much the result of these EPs not being surveyed to the same extent as other in the EC chapter, but wondering doesn’t necessarily get us very far. At any rate, if folks have some thoughts they’d care to share, I’m all ears!

Next up, we encounter our latest acronym PEP—short for Physical Environment Portal. As I noted to my friend and colleague Jay Kumar, there are many more rhyming opportunities for PEP than for portal, so I’m down with this.

This month’s update focuses on the some of the problematic aspects of LS.02.01.10, which mostly deals with the requirements revolving around your fire-rated barriers. Interestingly enough, it appears that the compliance gaps relate to managing rated doors and rated barrier walls (I’m sure you are all just as shocked as I am with that information). There are a couple of click-through links to Joint Commission Resources, which are basically reprints of some Clarification & Expectations columns from the June and July 2012 editions of EC News. I’m thinking you may already have those in hand, but if not, they are offered free of charge (you just have to register). The example of improved compliance is kind of interesting in a rather non-illuminative way, but that may just be me. So (and this may be a function of having to come up with compelling content every month), a not particularly peppy PEP this month, but what can you do?

As a final bit of info this week, I don’t know if you saw the marketing for the July Environment of Care Base Camp session, but I found it interesting that they’re really playing up the “you can’t get this information anywhere else” card, with a further indication that any other EC educational programs are based on findings from last year. Basically, they’re saying that if you pony up the dough, you can find out what the focus of the physical environment survey is this year (presumably based on the first few months of 2016), which sounds just a little bit extortionate to me. If memory serves, the purpose of the whole Physical Environment Portal was to provide healthcare facilities and safety professionals insight to the process and allow for more effective preparation, etc. Which I guess only serves to indicate that you get what you pay for…but should you have to pay for information regarding the expectations of regulatory inspectors/AHJs? It’s like having to go to a conference to have access to all this great content, etc., and no really useful way to determine if what you missed was of critical importance. I’m thinking that our budgetary focus would be more towards making operational improvements as opposed to spending time away at a conference, but perhaps I’m just a wee bit crazy…

Thanks to Jay Kumar for the “hep to PEP” line! See you next week…

A most mortal portal: Yes, Virginia, you need to have an inventory of your devices…all of ’em

And so, the flying fickle finger of compliance finally points portally (via The Joint Commission’s Physical Environment Portal) in the direction of that most troublesome of standards, EC.02.03.05, and we return once again to the fireside of our intrepid duo, Messrs. George Mills of The Joint Commission and Dale Woodin of ASHE. There are two videos, one for the facilities audience and one for leadership (does anyone else find it fascinating that the duo dons neckwear for the leadership video?).

While I don’t want to engage in revealing any spoilers, in the video, EC.02.03.05 is described as being “most prescriptive” and “frustrating” and also notes that Mr. Mills has taken some pains to “tear apart” the standard in past “Clarifications and Expectations” columns in Joint Commission Perspectives. Yet, yet, yet, approximately 40% of hospitals continue to get cited for deficiencies relative to the myriad components represented in this standard. I personally would love to see how this actually breaks down in terms of which of the 20+ performance elements are the most problematic (I can’t imagine that there are some that “float” to the top more than any others), but the video does seem to indicate what the “problems” are:

 

  1. You have to have an inventory, by location, of each device class, meaning smoke detectors, heat detectors, pull stations, HVAC shutdown devices, water flows, tamper switches, fire extinguishers, etc. It seems to me that back in the day, there was a reluctance on the part of our Chicagoan friends to actually say the words that would indicate the need for an inventory. But it all comes down (or back—I think I’ve beaten this particular breathless equine once or twice in the past) to knowing that you inspected, tested, maintained, each device in the fire alarm system. So if you (or your vendor’s documentation) do not specifically indicate that each device was demonstrably inspected, tested, maintained, then (buzzer sound): you lose!
  2. The documentation has to be available “upon request”, so really, if you can’t produce the current documentation PDQ, then (buzzer sound): you lose! You can only get credit for those inspection, testing and maintenance activities for which you have available documentation—if you didn’t document it, you didn’t do it. Period. End of story.

Now I certainly recognize that a combination of findings under EC.02.03.05 would drive a finding under the Leadership standards (to be exact, LD.04.01.05 EP 4), based on past survey reports. But apparently there is indeed a magic number of EC.02.03.05 EP findings that will result in the Leadership finding—three or more EPs out of compliance, then (bell rings): you win a discussion with your boss as to how you allowed (and I’m using that term in its most pejorative sense) such a thing to happen. At that point, for example, it is way too late to admit that the fire alarm and sprinkler testing vendors have not given you very useful reports (and something tells me that that particular conversation is not as rare as it ought to be). From watching the video (and in providing a neckwear-enhanced video specifically for your organization’ s leaders and Mr. Mills indicates he had to edumacate his bosses too—we are not alone), there is a very clear expectation that you, the facility/safety professional, will make the effort to proactive communicate with your boss, particularly if you are experiencing service issues, etc., in getting these activities under control. You can certainly make the case that the protection of the entire organization can be compromised if your fire alarm and sprinkler systems are not appropriately maintained, so, really, any infrastructure concerns should be communicated in a timely fashion to the leadership of each organization to ensure that appropriate resources are allocated on an ongoing basis to make sure everything stays on an even keel.

At any rate, our duo takes great pains to point out that none of this stuff is new (the “seed” documents from NFPA 72, 25 and the like having been penned way back in the 20th century), but I do feel that the methodology for surveying has evolved/mutated over time. I mean, if it were really that simple, wouldn’t this go away? They also point out that ASHE has a fair amount of information to assist you in your compliance efforts (ASHE Focus on Compliance: you can be especially warm for their forms) and there’s even a PowerPoint presentation that The Joint Commission uses at the EC Base Camp presentations (you can link to the presentation on the left hand side of the portal page), which gives it the power of the Quadruple P—Portal PowerPoint Presentation! Ultimately, you’ve got to keep a really close eye on this stuff, aside from product expiration dates, the management of the various and sundry elements of EC.02.03.05 is among the most voluminous in sheer numbers—that’s a lot of spheres to keep up in the air—and you only have to drop a couple to earn that lovely chat with your boss. I am absolutely convinced we can make it happen, so let’s see what we can do to retire EC.02.03.05 from the top 10. (Or 20…wouldn’t that be a fine thing?)

More portal chortlings—under the god(s) of compliance

I guess one could say that it took them a wee bit to get around to the topic of the requirements (and survey vulnerabilities) relating to the built healthcare environment, but they’re really going full bore on EC.02.06.01, particularly as a function of making sure that the responsibility of organizational leadership is recognized as a (if not the) critical component of compliance. I know we’ve already covered the latest fireside chats from Messrs. Mills and Woodin, but if you have not already done so, I would encourage you to do two things (and part of me is a little anxious as this smacks a bit of endorsement, but I think this is important):

 

  • Include a viewing of the fireside chats at your EOC Committee meetings; I don’t know that I would do all of them at once, but they are certainly brief enough to do one a month. I think it’s crazy important for everyone on the Committee to review the contents of the videos and while I know that you could just furnish the links to the Committee members and have them view on their own, I suspect that there might be some very valuable discussions to be had if you watch it as a group (heck, you could even make some popcorn—multigrain, no butter, perhaps a light dusting of sea salt), with maybe 10 minutes of discussions. While there is not much in the way of epiphanies in the content of the videos (I think everyone kind of recognizes what needs to happen), again, I think you could have a pretty good discussion regarding some of the concepts covered and the practical application of those concepts in your organization. You might even invite folks from procedural environments that are not typically members of the Committee. This is a huge focus of the survey process at the moment and the closer we can get to an intimate understanding of the dynamics, the better off we’ll all be.
  • Share the video with your boss (and if you can do it, your boss’s boss); the fact of the matter is that findings in this area could very well (it’s almost a likelihood) result in a finding under the Leadership standards, which ostensibly ties this up (and back) to the governing board of your organization. I don’t think that you’ll have a very easy time of managing the built healthcare environment without the knowledge and support of your organization’s leaders. We can no longer act as though this stuff is the responsibility of a few folks in the “trenches”; the management of the physical environment extends from point of care/point of service all the way to the top of the organization. It’s all about stewardship and everyone’s role in that pursuit.

Now I’m sure some folks are getting tired of me harping on this dynamic, but until we start managing the physical environment in a proactive, risk-aware manner, the Top 10 is going to continue to be EC Corner—and I don’t think any of us want that.

To assist in providing information to leaders, the latest update to this part of the portal is a downloadable file of the contents of the videos and the posted materials (not quite a transcript). Hopefully you have a leadership team that’s on board with this stuff, but if not, you’ve got to keep hammering on it. Visit this link to get a refresher on the materials.

 

 

If anyone has some success stories in this regard, I (for one) would love to hear about them. We are a community of safety professionals; the success of one can be the success of all, so let’s make it happen!

 

Cue the drum roll: Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the Portal of Perception!

Not so very long ago, The Joint Commission and ASHE announced the creation of an information resource to assist with all those pesky EC/LS findings that have been reproducing like proverbial rabbits (here’s coverage of that announcement  and coverage of those rapidly reproducing findings).

Well, since that announcement, the elves have been very busy cobbling together bits and pieces of this and that, with the end result being a rather interesting blend of stuff (please note that I did not employ the more severe descriptor—stuff and nonsense), with titles like “Is Your Hospital’s Air Ventilation System Putting Your Patients At Risk?” (this one’s in the Leadership module, so I guess they’re asking the question of organizational leadership). I truly hope that your response to that particular query would be “absolutely not,” but I’ve also been working this part of the street long enough to know (absolutely, if you will allow me a brief moment of hyperbole) that there are few absolutes when it comes to the management of the physical environment.

Which leads me to the follow-up thought: Recognizing that there is always the potential for the performance of air ventilation systems to drift a little out of expected ranges, at what point does the performance of air ventilation systems actually put patients at risk? And perhaps most importantly, have you identified those “points” in the performance “curve” that result in conditions that could legitimately cause harm to our patients? And please know that I understand (in perhaps a very basic sense, but I think I can call it an understanding) how properly designed and maintained HVAC systems contribute to the reduction of HAIs, etc. But with any fluid situation, there is an ebb and a flow to conditions, etc., that, again, may veer into the “red” zone from a compliance standpoint. But let me ask you—particularly those of you who have experienced out-of-range conditions/values—have those conditions resulted in a discernible impact on your infection control rates, especially those relating to surgical site infections?

BTW, I’m asking because I really don’t know what you folks are experiencing. And, for those of you that have identified shortcomings on the mechanical side of things, are your Infection Control folks keeping a close (or closer) eye on where those shortcomings might manifest themselves as a function of impact to patients? From the information posted in the Portal (I think I’m going to capitalize), remedying compliance issues in this regard is a simple four-step process (You can find the example of improved compliance there). Who knew it would be so easy? (I could have had a V8!) I don’t think anyone in the field is looking at this as a simple, or easy, task.

At any rate, despite the best efforts of the Portal, until we have buildings (and staff) that are a little closer to perfect, I think we’re going to continue to see a lot of EC/LS findings during survey. Ohboyohboyohboyohboyohboy!

Also, as I think about it, please be sure to check out the Clarifications and Expectations column in the September issue of Joint Commission Perspectives; there are some interesting points to be gleaned, the particulars of which we will cover in a wee bit, so watch this space!