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One of your sprinkler heads is loaded: Can you find it before they do?

And now, to the recap of the 10 most frequently cited standards during all of 2018 (in hospitals; other programs are a little more varied), as chosen by somebody other than you (or me): the survey troops at TJC.

The top 10 are as follows:

  • EC 02.01.35—The hospital provides and maintains systems for extinguishing fires (88.9% noncompliance percentage).
  • EC 02.05.01—The hospital manages risks associated with its utility systems (78.7%).
  • EC 02.06.01—The hospital establishes and maintains a safe, functional environment (73.9%).
  • LS 02.01.30—The hospital provides and maintains building features to protect individuals from the hazards of fire and smoke (72.9%).
  • IC 02.02.01—The hospital reduces the risk of infections associated with medical equipment, devices, and supplies (70.9%)
  • LS 02.01.10—Building and fire protection features are designed and maintained to minimize the effects of fire, smoke, and heat (70.7%).
  • LS 02.01.20—The hospital maintains the integrity of the means of egress (67.4%).
  • EC 02.05.05—The hospital inspects, tests, and maintains utility systems (64.7%).
  • EC 02.02.01—The hospital manages risks related to hazardous materials and waste (62.3%).
  • EC 02.05.09—The hospital inspects, tests, and maintains medical gas and vacuum systems (62.1%).

The ongoing hegemony of the top 10’s EOC-centric focus (and I still consider IC.02.02.01 the point upon which infection control and the physical environment intersect—sometimes with spectacular results) leaves little to the imagination (both ours and the surveyors). While you can still get into some significant trouble with certain processes, etc. (more on that next week—I figure if they can have a Top 10 list, then so can I…), the reason that these particular standards continue to jockey for position is because they represent the kinds of conditions (to some degree, I hesitate to call them deficiencies) that you can find literally any (and every) day in your organization. Just think about LS.02.01.35 for a moment: How far would you have to go before you found schmutz on a sprinkler head, something within 18 inches of a sprinkler head, a missing escutcheon (or an escutcheon with a gap), or even something (likely network cabling) lying atop, wire-tied to, somehow “touching” sprinkler piping or supports? I’m going to intuit that you probably won’t have to range too far afield to find something that fits in that category. The only thing I can say is whoever was surveying the “other” 11.1 % of the hospitals in 2018 must not have felt like poking around too much.

At any rate, I don’t know that there is a lot to glean from the 2018 results (same as it ever was…), but if someone out there has a question or concern that they’d like to share, I’m all ears!

Inadvertent inundations: Oh, what fun! 2017 most frequently stubbed toes during survey!

As luck would have it, the latest (April 2018) edition of Perspectives landed on the door step the other day (it’s really tough to pull off the home delivery option now that it is an all-electronic publication) and included therein is not a ton of EC/LS/EM content unless you count (which, of course, we do) the listings of the most frequently cited standards during the 2017 survey season. And, to the continued surprise of absolutely no one that is paying attention, conditions and practices related to the physical environment occupy all 10 of the top spots (I remain firm in my “counting” IC.02.02.01 as a physical environment standard—it’s the intersection of IC and the environment and always will be IMHO).

While there are certainly no surprises as to how this list sorts itself out (though I am a little curious/concerned about the rise of fire alarm and suppression system inspection, testing & maintenance documentation rising to the top spot—makes me wonder what little code-geeky infraction brought on by the adoption of the updated Life Safety Code® and other applicable NFPA standards has been the culprit—maybe some of it is related to annual door inspection activities cited before CMS extended the initial compliance due date), it clearly signals that the surveying of the physical environment is going to be a significant focus for the survey process until such time as it starts to decline in “fruit-bearing.” I do wish that there was a way to figure out for sure which of the findings are coming via the LS survey or during those pesky patient tracer activities (documentation is almost certainly the LS surveyor and I’d wager that a lot of the safe, functional environment findings are coming from tracers), but I guess that’s a data set just beyond our grasp. For those of you interested in how things “fell,” let’s do the numbers (cue: Stormy Weather):

  • #1 with an 86% finding rate – documentation of fire alarm and suppression systems
  • #2 with a 73% finding rate – managing utility systems risks
  • #3 with a 72% finding rate – maintenance of smoke and other lesser barrier elements
  • #4 with a 72% finding rate – risk of infections associated with equipment and supplies
  • #5 with a 70% finding rate – safe, functional environment
  • #6 with a 66% finding rate – maintenance of fire and other greater barrier elements
  • #7 with a 63% finding rate – hazardous materials risk stuff
  • #8 with a 62% finding rate – integrity of egress
  • #9 with a 62% finding rate – inspection, testing & maintenance of utility systems equipment
  • #10 with a 59% finding rate – inspection, testing & maintenance of medical gas & vacuum systems equipment

Again, I can’t imagine that you folks are at all surprised by this, so I guess my question for you all would be this: Does this make you think about changing your organization’s preparation activities or are you comfortable with giving up a few “small” findings and avoiding anything that would get you into big trouble? I don’t know that I’ve heard of any recent surveys in which there were zero findings in the environment (if so, congratulations! And perhaps most importantly: What’s your secret?), so it does look like this is going to be the list for the next little while.

Steak tips, turkey tips, and compliance tips—such a deal!

I’m not entirely certain what to make of this, but I always try to share anything I come across that might prove useful to you folks in the field. Back in July (yes, I know we are now edging towards the wintry portion of our year—we’ve had a lot of stuff to discuss), in one of the regular editions of Joint Commission Online, there was a list of compliance tips for the most frequently cited Life Safety standards.

Nothing wrong with that, as a going concern, but where I kind of got bogged down when I looked at the tips is that they weren’t necessarily in reference to stuff I’ve seen most in the field. All code compliance tidbits, to be sure, but again, not necessarily the type of stuff with which I’ve seen folks struggle.

As an example, the first tip deals with the required clear width of doors to sleeping rooms, egress doors, and doors to diagnostic treatment areas (existing construction must have at least 32 inches of clear width; new construction must have at least 41½ inches of clear width). Now I can think of a few instances in which I’ve encountered doors that were a might on the narrow side, but I’m also thinking door width is driving this particular standard (LS.02.01.20—egress requirements) to be among the most cited in all of survey land? I don’t know, which is why I’m not sure what to make of this. At any rate, make of it what you will—just make sure you grill those tips to your liking.