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I’m fixing a hole

For our next topic of conversation regarding George Mills’ address to the folks in ASHE last year, we take up the ever-vexing task of managing penetrations. Now, there’s certainly been a lot of ire pointed towards the folks who run cabling in healthcare—IT, cabling contractors, etc. But this represents something of a sea change in the public face of this problem—while there certainly any number of “perps” when it comes to making holes in rated barriers, there is a very clear sense that appropriate management of the process results in the buck stopping at a single destination: the desk of the facilities management professional.

So, a quick show of hands: How many folks are using an above the ceiling work permitting process? That many? That’s a pretty good number. But how are you administering that process? Have you told the entire organization about the process? Maybe established a bounty for finding folks working in the ceiling without a permit? You have tens of thousands, if not hundreds of thousands, of square feet in which mischief can occur above the ceiling. If you establish the condition that anyone (and that means  folks employed by the hospital—everyone is equal in the eyes of a penetrated rated barrier) working above ceiling must display a permit on the ladder or lift—and get folks to call in when someone is working without a permit, then you can start to manage the process. By the way, I’m a great believer in rewarding folks who drop a dime for this and don’t be cheap; at least buy ’em lunch somewhere nice. And if you find you’re spending too much money feeding your dime-droppers, then that means that your permit process is not working very effectively!

When you find someone working above the ceiling without a permit, throw the bum out! Nothing draws attention to a process like a good swift kick in the pocketbook. If someone does not want to work by our rules, then they can work elsewhere, pure and simple. Then they can explain to their boss why they couldn’t finish a job, as opposed to you having to explain to your boss why you’re getting an RFI for rated barrier penetrations. I know which scenario I’d prefer…

One last thought: As for “existing” penetrations, Mr. Mills clearly indicated the expectation that facilities will undertake an above-the-ceiling inspection at least once per year to catch any deficiencies that were not captured by the normal process. Then you either fix them properly or manage them as a PFI (with applicable ILSM assessment—please don’t forget that piece of the puzzle). It’s really just that simple.

Suites for the sweet

Continuing our coverage of George Mills’ address to the ASHE folks last fall, we turn to what was described as an area with a “lot of problems”:  The management of suites.

So, before we get started on this one, I’d like you to make a mental list of all the areas in your organization that have been designated as suites (if you’re not sure what a “suite” is, please e-mail me on the side at the address listed below and I will try to help you to get acquainted with this most useful of life safety concepts). Now that you have that mental list appropriately populated, take out your life safety drawings and check to see how many of those suites are specifically identified (this means the perimeter boundaries of the suite, as well as the square footage of the suite). If you have suites that you have mentally designated, but haven’t gone through the process of having them identified on your life safety drawings, in all likelihood you are looking at RFIs for anything from corridor storage to non-latching corridor doors (suites can have stuff and patient rooms doors that don’t latch – benefit!).

In some ways, this very much comes under the category of things that you have to “know”; it is not nearly enough to “think” that something is compliant. If you expect to successfully navigate the survey process, you have to translate the “think” to the “know.” As a facilities management professional, it is incumbent upon you to have absolute knowledge of where your facility “lies” on the compliance chart. By all means, use your vendors and service folks to gain that knowledge, but be assured of one thing: They won’t be the ones in the “hot seat” come survey time—and you’d better know how to cool off that seat.

It’s up to you to heed the call out

If you’re reading this, then in all likelihood you’re a regular subscriber to this august publication (august in February—what kind of crazy talk is that, but I digress). In which case, I’m sure you read with some interest the article a couple of weeks ago in which one Mr. George Mills (of the Joint Commission Mills) called out facilities professionals for something akin to dereliction of duty (okay, that might be a wee bit hyperbolic, but this topic, and Mr. Mills stance on said topic, are as serious as all get out), based on the continued frequency of findings in the EC/LS part of the survey process.

At any rate, back in October 2012, Mr. Mills addressed a group of facility managers during a webinar sponsored by ASHE. During the webinar, there was much discussion of the persistence of  EC/LS findings during surveys, including attribution of many of those findings to what was characterized as a “lack of management.”  I think we can agree that, as characterizations go, that is a very strongly worded characterization indeed.  So what types of things are resulting in this level of unhappiness in Chicago? Stay tuned and we’ll find out (by the way, be prepared not to be surprised about much, or even any, of the sticking points during surveys. If you’ve been following this space for any period of time, you are already intimately familiar with the foibles and follies of the modern-day survey process.