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Transformers: When finders become fixers

Way back when (and it was way longer ago than I might have thought—time flies when you’re having fun), we first discussed the idea of finders and fixers in the healthcare world (go here for a refresh on that conversation). Since then, I have proselytized that fairly simple concept in a majority of my consulting work, but I recently had kind of a breakthrough that I wanted to throw out there for your consideration.

One of my personal primary directives when I am consulting is that if I find something that I can resolve on my own, I feel it is my obligation to fix it. So you may see me doing something as simple as picking up trash as I walk along (even outside) or wiping up a spill in a refrigerator—basically conditions that one could consider “quick” fixes. I started thinking about how we could kind of take things to the “next” level in the evolution of the finder and fixer equation. And I came up with a hybrid creation of finder/fixers; wouldn’t that be a pretty nifty way of managing minor conditions and deficiencies in the environment? Folks at the point of care/point of service that are so empowered that they, as a matter of course, would just resolve the issue on their own. I think that would be pretty cool.

Part of me thinks that the finder/fixer thing might be a little bit of a bridge too far, but maybe just imagining such a world might make it a little more possible. So: do you have any finder/fixers in your organization? And if you do, did you “grow” them or did they emerge fully-formed? I’m really trying to spread this accountability for managing the environment as far as I can and any data/information can only help.

Finders and fixers: Can we get them to say something if they see something?

One of things that continuously comes up on my pondering list is how to enlist the eyes, ears, noses, and fingers of frontline staff in the pursuit of the early identification of risks in the physical environment. Unless one of the facilities maintenance folks happens to be in the right place at the right time, in all likelihood, an aberrant condition is going to manifest itself to somebody working out at the point of care/point of service. And my firm belief is that the organizations that manage environmental risks most effectively (including the “risks” associated with unannounced regulatory survey visits) are the organizations that have most effectively harnessed these hundreds, if not thousands, of agents in the field 24/7.

So, my latest take on this is that we can subdivide the totality of every (and, really, any) organization into two main constituencies—finders and fixers. The key is to get the finders mobilized, so the fixers (who, truth be told, in most organizers are currently finder-fixers) can focus on actually repairing/replacing stuff. I’m at a loss to explain why this can be such a difficult undertaking, so I’ll ask you, dear reader: What do you think? Or if you’ve found a way to really mobilize the “finders” in your organization, how did you make it happen? Did you have to guilt them into it, did you establish a “bounty” system for reporting conditions, etc.? I am firmly convinced that if we can enlist these folks in the identification of hazards, we can really move towards a process for ensuring constant readiness.