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Don’t Call It A Comeback: The Statement of Conditions breathes again!

Not a whole lot going on in the July 2019 issue of Perspectives, but it appears that a little more consideration will need to be paid to the Statement of Conditions (SOC) and Basic Building Information (BBI) sections of The Joint Commission’s web portal for hospitals and other healthcare organizations. The article in Perspectives indicates that we can expect some changes to the questions asked in the BBI section, though the only specific indication thus far is that the questions relating to square footage of your buildings will be aimed at obtaining greater specificity of information, ostensibly to aid in the planning of survey visits. The impression I always had when it came to the square footage ranges was that they tended to “look” at the upper end of the range information, sometimes “encouraging” additional survey days when they might not necessarily have been warranted. My consultative recommendation to folks was to use the comment section to indicate the precise (or would “exact” be the more appropriate descriptor?) square footage so there would be minimal potential for extra survey days. Should be interesting to see how this all shakes out over the next few months as more “reveals” make themselves known.

In other news, the next edition (2022—can you imagine!?!) of the FGI Guidelines for the Design of Healthcare Facilities is in the development pipeline and the good folks at FGI are looking for comments/suggestions to aid in that development, but the window for doing so is quickly closing. You can check out the skinny here, but please know that the comment, etc., period ends on June 30. So if you have some burning thoughts/suggestions for how we will be managing our future facilities (including renovation activities), now is the time for all good safety professionals to come to the aid of their craft (or something like that…).

To close out this week’s chatter, I would encourage you to (yet again!) check out Tim Richards’ blog regarding medical gas certifications and qualifications. As you’ve no doubt noticed, the ongoing codification of everything has really “leaned” into staff competencies and qualifications, sometimes to the point of really muddying the waters as to what really is required. When it comes to medical gas stuff, I don’t know that you’ll be surprised, but it might be useful information to share with your boss (or your boss’s boss). Check it out here.

Wishing each of you a most festive and safe Independence Day!

Coastal curiosities (Part deux)

At The Joint Commission’s Executive Briefings conference in September, another question that I found of some interest/horror (and please remember—that’s horror with a small “h”) continued the charge into the realms of environmental compliance.

Q: What areas need to be monitored for humidity and temperature? Does this include ICU patient rooms?

A: There are multiple areas in a hospital that require humidity and temperatures be monitored. Recovery rooms, Critical Intensive Care, and procedure rooms all require 30% to 60 % humidity and temperatures ranging from 70-75 degrees Fahrenheit. Other areas can have the same humidity levels but varied temps like the newborn nursery suite, which should have temperatures from 72-78 degrees Fahrenheit and Endoscopy would have temperatures from 68-73 degrees Fahrenheit. A very good reference is the AIA Guidelines for Design and Construction of Hospitals and Healthcare Facilities.

So I’ll ask you: How many folks out there are monitoring your Intensive Care Unit rooms for temperature and humidity? By the way, apparently the “faculty” in this instance were not quite familiar with the categorical waiver relating to humidity levels down to 20%. Actually, I suppose invocation of the American Institute of Architects Guidelines might be an indication that they were using an older edition of the Guidelines, since we all know that they’re the Facilities Guidelines Institute (FGI) Guidelines now.

I think minimally we can take this as further indication of an expansion of survey scrutiny into other areas of the hospital when it comes to the management of environmental conditions. I still think the best thing you can do is to get a copy of the 2010 FGI Guidelines, turn to the section at the end of this mighty tome that deals with the ventilation standards, start making a list, and check it twice.

We’ll cover the remaining questions and answers over the next little while; nothing quite as raucous as these first two, but nonetheless instructive.